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sinsis
30th July 2000, 19:38
Dear Budoists,

For a while now I search for information about Hojutsu. The gentile art of rope tying. On the internet there is not much, except some bondage photo's. Who knows if there are any (online) publications about the technical aspects of Hojutsu.

Thanks and greetings,

Sinsis. :look:

sinsis
30th July 2000, 19:47
Please do not react on this NEW thread since there are already a view threads with the same subject. That I did not see :o

sinsis
1st August 2000, 13:42
sorry

Paul Steadman
19th October 2000, 08:41
Hi From Australia,

Does anyone out there know where one might obtain a working original (or replica) Hinawa-ju/Tanegashima; Japanese matchlock-muzzleloading firearm in Australia (or internationally) for Ho-jutsu use (art of the matchlock gun)???

The gun must be capable of actual loading and firing of live ammunition.

Any information at all would be greatly appreciated!

There is a chance that a Ho-jutsu Ryu will might be operating in Australia in the future, under the auspices of an authentic Ryu in Japan as directed by the current head-master!

Regards,

Paul Steadman

ghp
19th October 2000, 17:08
Paul, would the headmaster be Shimazu Kenji, 18th Shihan of Yagyu Shingan Ryu Jujutsu?

http://www.trifox.com/aux/kenshinkan/photos/shimazukenji.jpg
Shimazu sensei on the left (as if you couldn't tell). Meiji Shrine Hono Enbu, Nippon Kobudo Shinkokai, 1993.

I just recognized him from all his appearances in Koryu Bujutsu magazine -- where he often is pictured in full yoroi firing a matchlock. I've never studied under him -- just a photo-op.

Regards,
Guy

Daniel Lee
20th October 2000, 03:54
post deleted at request

[Edited by Daniel Lee on 10-20-2000 at 10:31 PM]

Paul Steadman
20th October 2000, 11:04
Gentlemen,

I am not at liberty to disclose any details of the ryu or sensei that may/may-not be starting up Ho-jutsu in Australia. I am only ascertaining the availability of said weapons on behalf of a friend of mine.

I was not aware that Shimazu Kenji-Sensei was a master of Ho-jutsu (although it does not surprise me). I have no details of his Ho-jutsu ryu (but I am interested and curious, as always). I know his Jujutsu is very effective though (from first-hand experience...ouch!).

I have approachd Hinshelwood-Sensei in the past re: studying under him in koryu bujutsu, but my request was declined due to him not taking apllications for deshi at the moment.

I'm still looking for any info on Hinawa-ju availablity in Australia or internationally. All the best.

Regards,

Paul Steadman

ghp
20th October 2000, 16:12
Daniel,


Shimazu-S is A master of, not THE master of Morishige Ryu, FWIW.

Hmmmmm... could be. I've "read" a few of his artilces in Hiden and he's definitely said there are 3 different traditions of Yagyu Shingan Ryu jujutsu, and each have their own shihan. He happens to be one of the three. I don't know Morishige ryu --- what sort of ryuha is it? He might be skilled in that art also.

Paul,

I don't know if the hojutsu that Shimazu sensei practices is part of Yagyu Shingan Ryu, or if it is independent. But the photos of his group kitted out in oyoroi is remarkable. I also remember seeing a photo of one within the group firing a veritible "hand cannone" -- It looked like a 60mm mortar.

Do you have the color photos? If not, let me know and I'll dig them out someday; though, I really *hate* rifling through all those issues since I haven't catalogued the contents.

Regards,
Guy

George Kohler
20th October 2000, 17:57
Originally posted by ghp
Hmmmmm... could be. I've "read" a few of his artilces in Hiden and he's definitely said there are 3 different traditions of Yagyu Shingan Ryu jujutsu, and each have their own shihan. He happens to be one of the three. I don't know Morishige ryu --- what sort of ryuha is it? He might be skilled in that art also.


Hi Guy,

I think there are more than three different branches of Yagyu Shingan Ryu.

Morishige Ryu is a Hojutsu school

Yes, he is a shihan for both ryuha (Actually, I thought Shimazu Sensei was the soke of Morishige Ryu. At least it said it in Diane Skoss' book, I think).

kabutoki
19th September 2003, 07:41
Musket firings to fete Tokugawa

A group of 200 people dressed as samurai warriors and riflemen will go on parade and shoot muskets at eight places around JR Okubo and Shin Okubo stations in Tokyo Sept. 28 to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the establishment of the Tokugawa Shogunate.
The first firing of the real matchlock muskets, which will be conducted by 35 of the marching samurai, will take place at 9:45 a.m. at Kaichu Inari Shrine, a one-minute walk from Shin Okubo Station toward Okubo Station.

The other firings will take place at: 10:10 a.m. at Hotel Kaiyo (2-27-2 Hyakunin-cho), 10:35 a.m. at NTT Shinjuku Bldg. (1-5-1 Kita Shinjuku), 11 a.m. at Kimura-ya Bldg. (7-5-14 Nishi Shinjuku), 11:25 a.m. at Choko-ji Temple (1-5-2 Hyakunin-cho), 11:45 a.m. at Seibu Railway Transformer Station (east side of Shin-Okubo station), noon at Toyama Elementary School (2-1-38 Hyakunin-cho), 1:30 p.m. at Nishi Toyama Baseball Field (4-1-1 Hyakunin-cho), and 2:30 p.m. at Kaichu Inari Shrine.

The Japan Times: Sept. 19, 2003
(C) All rights reserved

Guy Buyens
24th October 2009, 16:08
Those who participated in or witnessed a demonstration of the Nihon Kobudo Kyokai will surely remember the final school of the day. The impressive sound made by one of the hojutsu schools is not something to easily forget.

Although hojutsu is koryu, I havenít seen much on this topic yet. May-be we could share some of our knowledge and document traditional hojutsu somewhat better?

I know that firearms were introduced in Japan in 1543 by the Portuguese traders on Tanegashima Island. The bushi class were really confronted with the superiority of firearms in the battle of Nagashino in 1575, where Oda Nobunaga introduced large scale use of firearms in the battlefield.

Firearm were operated by common (non samurai) soldiers but the strategy, and the use of the weapons were codified in Hojutsu schools like Morishige-ryu and Seki-ryu.

Initially, small arms (called Teppo) were in use, but starting around 1570, there was already the emergence of large-scale guns with cannons and hand cannons coming into use in the Genki (1570-1573) and Tensho (1573-1592) Eras.

I also know that Japanese matchlock are still often called Tanegashima.

Recently I saw a demonstration of Seki-ryu, which is characterized by the use of a mortar with a pistol grip (no shoulder stock). I know less about Morishige-ryu and Yo-ryu, the 2 other schools that are member of the Nihon Kobudo Kyokai.

Has any-one an idea on how tradition is passed on within these schools?

DDATFUS
25th October 2009, 00:44
I've actually heard my instructor talk about that a bit, but I can't remember enough of what he said off the top of my head. I'll try to see what he recalls the next time I get a chance.

sobujutsu
25th October 2009, 08:07
Here are links to youtube:

Yo ryu Hojutsu:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITOqpQWGNBw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMwCD8VOxVI


Morishige ryu Hojutsu:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpiAKkjplU8&feature=player_embedded

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQU17CkmAQg&feature=player_embedded

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7Uy07q5ifw&feature=player_embedded#

Akisuki Hayashi ryu Hojutsu:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEwUhyiDAkg&feature=player_embedded

Here are links to Japanese stites for Hayashi ryu Hojutsu:
http://www.geocities.jp/joysunny/hukuoka/hukuoka25.htm
http://www.geocities.jp/joysunny/hukuoka/hukuoka71.htm
http://www.geocities.jp/joysunny/hukuoka/hukuoka72.htm
http://www.geocities.jp/joysunny/hukuoka/hukuoka73.htm
http://www.geocities.jp/joysunny/hukuoka/hukuoka74.htm

These sites are consisting mostly of pictures.
That's the only thing I can give you.

hope that helps

Martin Lasser

Shingan
25th October 2009, 08:21
Recently I saw a demonstration of Seki-ryu, which is characterized by the use of a mortar with a pistol grip (no shoulder stock). I know less about Morishige-ryu and Yo-ryu, the 2 other schools that are member of the Nihon Kobudo Kyokai.

Has any-one an idea on how tradition is passed on within these schools?

Hello Guy,

The Morishige ryu has been passed on in the same manner as other koryu traditions. As a student of Shimazu Kenji a Shihan of the Morishige ryu and Yagyu Shingan Ryu Heihojutsu I can say I have thoroughly enjoyed my training in the Morishige ryu.

Morishige ryu was founded by Morishige Yukie Subeyoshi of Yamaguchi prefecture, who was an expert in Naval and Military strategy.

The first kata taught to the disciple is Ihanashi no kata. This is a kata of etiquette performed in front of distinguished guests.

The licence's bestowed are Shoden, Kirigami, Mokuroku and Kaiden.

Regards
Philip

Guy Buyens
25th October 2009, 09:36
Morishige ryu was founded by Morishige Yukie Subeyoshi of Yamaguchi prefecture, who was an expert in Naval and Military strategy.


Thank you Philip.

We now learned from you that Morishige ryu was founded (do you know when?) by Morishige Yukie Subeyoshi (I have heard also pronounce his name Morishige Yukie Tsuyoshi) and we received some information on transmission. I also know that the school is currently located in Oowadashinden, Yachiyo-shi, (Chiba-ken). Any idea who is soke (and which generation)? I probably can find it in some publications of the Nihon Kobudo Kyokai but I didn't had the time yet.

When and how where other schools founded and how is the art transmitted?
I do know that the current 11th generation headmaster of Seki-ryu is Seki Masanobu and the school is lokated in Nishimanabe-machi, Tsuchiura-shi (Ibaraki-ken).
From Yo-ryu I only know that they are located in Chiyo, Hakata-ku, Fukuoka-shi, (Fukuoka-ken).

Shingan
25th October 2009, 10:05
Your welcome Guy. I'll send you a private email.
Regards,

Philip

ZealUK
25th October 2009, 10:39
There are a few documents about various Hojutsu ryuha on this (http://www.wul.waseda.ac.jp/kotenseki/search.php) website.

Search for 砲術 and 19 documents come up.

This guy's blog (http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/aitinokaze/MYBLOG/yblog.html?m=lc&p=1) also has a few interesting bits a few pages in.

Guy Buyens
25th October 2009, 15:35
Morishige ryu was founded by Morishige Yukie Subeyoshi of Yamaguchi prefecture, who was an expert in Naval and Military strategy.
The first kata taught to the disciple is Ihanashi no kata. This is a kata of etiquette performed in front of distinguished guests.
The licence's bestowed are Shoden, Kirigami, Mokuroku and Kaiden.


My question on transmission was purely out of curiosity. Are there kata (I now understand tere are)? Are there regular training sessions? Do we have to imagine a similar approach than in archery schools?

I was first intrigued by these questions when reading on the losses made in a single battle in 1575 where samurai archers were taken down by Nobunaga's army consisting mainly of farmers armed with arquebuses. Would these men be considered member of a hojutsu school or would it only be the instructors (who had to transmit strategy and techniques) that where member of the school. Of course the example is maybe not well chosen, since most hojutsu schools were formalised much later in history.

Fred27
17th December 2009, 23:12
Japanese TV-special: Hojutsu.

Found a clip featuring some sort of Japanese tv-special showing and demonstrating the Japanese arquebus. It also shows a demonstrator shooting with live bullets.
I'm fairly sure the narrator mentions Seki ryu hojutsu somewhere too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kq9jkQK0awU&feature=related

Hissho
18th December 2009, 03:33
That is too cool.

Eric Spinelli
18th December 2009, 10:19
I'm fairly sure the narrator mentions Seki ryu hojutsu somewhere too.
Yes, the gentleman in white from 1:03 is from 関流; it's both mentioned by the narrator and written on his lapel.

Thanks for the link.