PDA

View Full Version : "Senso ryu" Aikijutsu/ Theodore Hanulak



Devon Smith
31st March 2001, 04:55
Hi folks,

I've been asked about an Aikijutsu/Zen school in Indianapolis, Indiana USA, and in trying to look into the details, I've run into a roadblock.

Does anyone recognize the name "Enio Sotou Roshi" in regards to MA or Zen? The words soto and roshi make sense to me regarding Zen, but I don't understand the use of the terms in a name. Web search has yielded nothing other than what's posted on the school's page. (http://www.aiki-jutsu.com/) This is a person who passed away in the '90's who taught Aikijutsu & Zen in the USA.


I checked for previous threads and found this, (http://204.95.207.136/vbulletin/showthread.php?s=&postid=31008#post31008) but I haven't any more recent info.

Thanks in advance!

Walter Kopitov
2nd April 2001, 12:50
I have been trying to get more information about this school also. It seems that his main teacher was Behran, and then Hanaluk trained with "Enio Sotou Roshi" for a short time I'm guessing under 3 years. Hanaluk had a club for his school on Yahoo and when I had asked for more information I was told to see him at his dojo and he would answer me. Since then he closed that club and the other he had on zen. In my opinion he has been exposed to Aikijujutsu but doesn't have legitimate instruction in the art. It would be nice if he responds with some evidence, I know I would if some one was asking about my background.


Walt

Nathan Scott
2nd April 2001, 22:15
Fair enough. I'll invite him over to discuss his (and his instructors) credentials, etc.

Regards,

Nathan Scott
2nd April 2001, 22:25
I just got off the phone with Mr. Hanulak, and he stated that he has no interest in discussing anything on any of the internet discussion boards. He apparently has found them all to be rude, and invited us to speak freely about him as we like.

He also invited those interested in finding out information about him to call him or email him directly. I couldn't find his email address, but his phone number is: 317-789-0179

Mr. Hanulak was a bit defensive when I asked for him, so you may want to skip any niceties and state your purpose up front. It sounds like he receives these kinds of calls pretty often.

Oh well, where were we?

Walter Kopitov
2nd April 2001, 22:50
Mr. Scott since you have spoken with him, did he give you any information at all? Do you think he will give any info if I call?

Walt

Nathan Scott
2nd April 2001, 22:58
Yes, he said he'd answer any questions I had, but that he wasn't interested in going online. HE had mentioned the Budokai board, so if that was one place he had gone, I can only imagine the reception he must have gotten.

I didn't ask him any questions because I am not personally all that curious about him, especially on my dime. I gave him a polite invitation to come participate, and he declined. If he is not willing to publicly discuss his art and crendentials some place, then a private discussion of the same would be useless, since it would not be documented.

Feel free to contact him, and if you discover anything of interest that he does not mind being posted publicly, write it up in this thread.

:)

Nathan Scott
11th April 2001, 22:54
Hello,

I forgot to update this thread. Mr. Hanulak called me back the day after I called him to apologize for being abrupt with me. He mentioned that nobody had called him yet to discuss his art or credentials, so there must not be a sincere interest in finding out.

We talked for a bit, but there is nothing really worth mentioning here.

Just thought I'd let you all know,

Chuck.Gordon
26th March 2002, 16:16
Anybody know anything about Senso Ryu Aikijutsu, ?

http://www.aiki-jutsu.com/

Just curious ...

Chuck

[THREADS MERGED. NS]

Arman
26th March 2002, 17:31
I don't have any personal knowledge regarding this style or its practitioners. Their history, however, as described on their web site, sounds somewhat dubious. They claim some tangential relationship to Daito-ryu, but they do not specify when, where or for how long.

I have no idea if their founders name is listed on any of Takeda S.'s ledgers, or if he is listed on any of Takeda S.'s students lists.

There apparently doesn't seem to be any substantial information on their web site regarding the lineage of the school.

I don't want to dimiss something without more information, but I have to say that their own web page doesn't provide enough information for a serious practitioner to determine the reliability of their claims.

I would be quite suspicious.

Sincerely,
Arman Partamian
Daito-ryu Study Group
Maryland

Walt. V Kopitov
26th March 2002, 17:32
There had been a couple of threads discussing him. If you do a search you should find out more. What I remember is that he was invited to discuss his art here but he turned it down.
I don't think he can connect his art to Daito-Ryu, his main instructor had been a Mr. Behran (sp?). That's all I remember.

Walt

Brently Keen
28th March 2002, 21:34
As far as I have been able to determine there is absolutely no connection at all between Daito-ryu and the so-called "aikijutsu" arts of Mr Behrens or Mr Hanaluk.

Mr Behrens used to frequently appear in Korean TKD magazines. While I've never met him, from his magazine articles and books he reminded me of a cross between Frank Dux and Fredrick Lovret for some reason. F.O.S. if you get my drift.

Brently Keen

MarkF
29th March 2002, 09:38
I think I get your drift, Brently, and would have to agree (FOS). Seems there is a little karate and/or KK, some judo "Using your opponents strength against him" as the latter is a quote from the site, and an "Everything is Zen" attitude.

Not only couldn't he connect it to DR, I doubt he can connect it very well with aikido or anything aiki, even with the two pics of "kotegaeshi" type locks/throws.

It does seem to be, in the beginning, some striking techniques, some judo/aikido throws, and lots of breathing and meditating (takes up lots of class time, if you get my drift).


Mark ;)

Dan Harden
29th March 2002, 12:55
Senso Ryu Aiki-jutsu? As in The "War" school of the art of Aiki?
It answers its own question.


I love the new international forums. Sooner or later everyone learns to read and comprehend. It makes the oxymoron art names and crazy lineages self-evident. Even the most die-hard loyal student eventually has their eyes opened.

"War" Aiki-jutsu
"Combat" Judo
Ya gotta love it
It's like all the idiots who try to validate their efforts by claiming some training time with SF. Anyone who has spent time with SF will tell you their hand to hand is no better or worse than any other similar cross section of the populace. It's all about hardware and mindset.

The "War" school of the art of Aiki? eeh gads! How men love to dream.

Dan

Chuck.Gordon
29th March 2002, 15:07
Hmm. Interesting comments. I don't personally know Hanulak (despite us both being in Indy and me having invited him to seminars at my place) and have never taken time to watch his classes, but a couple of my students have. When I first heard about him, I was thrilled that some traditional budo was coming to Indy, and we did, in fact, exchange notes a few times, but never got together.

Then I found his website. I remember having been contacted by Behrens some years ago, exchanged a few notes with him, too. He seemed like a nice guy, very sincere. Not, however, my cup of tea at all, at all ...

The thing that piqued my interest in Hanulak is that he fist offered to sub-let space in his dojo for my club. A kind offer, but one I declined due more to locale than anything else. He seemed okay, friendly and sincere. So, I included him in a local budo mailing list I use to keep folks informed about seminars, clinics and visitors to my place. After a few such notices, he asked (not impolitely, but not particularly friendly either) that he be removed and that I not bother him again. No problem. I complied and haven't communicated with him since then.

About that time, I picked up a new student who had visited Hanulak's dojo but had decided to come train with me instead.

Seeking some answers to his questions, I peeked back in on the www.aiki-jutsu.com website and was interested to see the changes that had occured.

I was curious about one particular background (on the dojo location and [hoto menu pages, it's still there as of today, BTW) and asked a Japanese-speaking friend to take a look. He said it appears to be a copy of a Daito Ryu menkyo.

More recently, my wife, a certified massage therapist with a growing practice here, was contacted by one of Hanulak's students because she said on her website (www.katsujin.com) that she worked on martial artists quite a bit. He extended a tentative offer to bring her in to their dojo and have her give a few clinics on budo-specific massage techniques. We both thought that was a grand idea, but (possibly after he found out she belonged to my dojo) he stopped contacting her.

Hopefully, that was a case of loss of interest or of finding some other avenue, rather than because she's part of my group.

Back to Hanulak. I've done some research, largely because some folks in the area have asked me about him. I can't find anything anywhere about the Enio Soto Roshi he refers to, except for a few hits on a few Hispanic individuals named Enio Soto (one was an insurance salesman, nice guy, but no martial arts experience a'tall).

Behrens, aside from his books, some of which are, um, quite odd, seems to have sort of disappeared as well. He used to have a fairly extensive website but I can't find anything about him except for the books these days.

I also couldn't find anything about any Senso Ryu existing pre-Hanulak or maybe Beherns, aside from the word 'senso' meaning battle. One reference I did see was the word 'senso' used to describe the daily grind of commuting in Tokyo.

It's also been my experience that aiki systems, especially the really traditional jujutsu stuff, has far less to do with Zen than Shinto or esoteric Buddhism. But thats a minor point, really. Not sure, but isn't there some governing body that oversees and deals with Zen practice? Or can anyone just set up a zendo and start teaching?

Very curious. Again, thanks for the comments!

Chuck

Greg Jennings
29th March 2002, 16:03
Originally posted by MarkF
Not only couldn't he connect it to DR, I doubt he can connect it very well with aikido or anything aiki, even with the two pics of "kotegaeshi" type locks/throws.

It does seem to be, in the beginning, some striking techniques, some judo/aikido throws, and lots of breathing and meditating (takes up lots of class time, if you get my drift).


From the glossary and the MPEGs, I'd say that someone, somehow or the other, borrowed a good deal of the school's nagewaza from mainline Aikikai aikido. There are even some obvious similarities of terminology and execution to my own branch. I'm not saying it got there through a student/teacher relationship, mind you. It could have come from a book, seminar or whatever.

If you're interested in details, feel free to e-mail me.

Best,

Nathan Scott
29th March 2002, 20:42
The background image that Mr. Gordon refered to on aiki-jutsu.com can be found here:

http://www.aiki-jutsu.com/kanjifade.jpg

It took me a few minutes to figure out if this menjo was correct or not - it does claim to be issued from the "Daito ryu Aikibudo SoHonbu", and is signed and stamped by "Soke Takeda Tokimune". However, as I suspected, this is simply a faded image of the Soke Dairi certificate issued to Kondo Katsuyuki s. by Tokimune s. - most likely lifted from his web page! This image can also be found (and confirmed) on page 171 of CWDRM.

Nice.

They don't seem to mention Daito ryu on their site, aside from a brief definition.

Anyway, this topic has been discussed at length in the following threads (that's why my opening message suggests doing a search first!):

"Senso ryu" aikijutsu/ Hanulak (http://204.95.207.136/vbulletin/showthread.php?s=&threadid=5351)

Torishimaru aikijutsu/ Richard Behrens (http://204.95.207.136/vbulletin/showthread.php?s=&threadid=3725)

I didn't bother to watch the MPEG's.

Regards,

MarkF
30th March 2002, 08:01
I didn't take the time to download and watch the MPEGs either. What is there in pictures does seem to be aikido-type nage-waza, mostly, but the phrase "Using your opponents strength against him" is very common to judo, but obviously can be used in most budo.

It was simply 2+2+2=6 very quickly.

While it may be a FOS web site and MA, it isn't the worst of them, by a longshot.

Mark

Chuck.Gordon
30th March 2002, 10:43
Originally posted by Nathan Scott
Anyway, this topic has been discussed at length in the following threads (that's why my opening message suggests doing a search first!):

Hi Nathan,

I did try the search for several terms, the ryu names, the people's names, etc, and the return was nil. That's why I asked.

I guess my next stop is to call and arrange a visit to Ted's place. I've had folks asking about the system and the dojo and want to be able to make an honest reccomendattion or not ...

Thanks for all the input!

Chuck

Nathan Scott
31st March 2002, 20:22
Funny enough Mr. Gordon, I also tried a search before posting my last message trying to save some time. The search only came up with this current thread.

I knew there was previous discussion, so went through the pages by hand looking at the titles.

The search used to work well, but maybe something is F'd up... I mean, malfunctioning.

I'll ask John - thanks for mentioning it.

Regards,

someguy
21st February 2004, 06:11
I know my former Sensei Ted Hanulak has been talk about in this group before an his first teaher Richard behrens has as well. Ted's second teacher has not really been talked about much becuase little if anything is known outside of Ted, but now on the website he has a picture of a japanese man in robes and the man is very young but could you nathan take a look and see if you can tell if he stole it from some where or is it a real picture of Enio Sotou Roshi.


James Fitzgerald

someguy
21st February 2004, 16:37
Sorry the website is www.Aiki-jutsu.com

thanks

james fitzgerald

someguy
22nd February 2004, 12:07
I guess no one knows or maybe no cares to help me becuase my post has been viewed over a hunderd times and no replies but mine so please just Delete this post and thank you all for nothing.


James Fitzgerald


Ps if you wanted me to post the picture here I can't i'm on a webtv unit.

Mark Jakabcsin
22nd February 2004, 12:43
James,
Simply put you are a Cyberjackass. You write asking for help, wait LESS then 24 hours and then cry like a 6 year old girl that no one helped responded. This 'Please delete my post since no one cares, ' crap is very childish.

Here's a clue for you, we don't all sit by the computer waiting hour after hour hoping that YOU will post so we can immediately post back. Nor is anyone obligated to post back simply because YOU posted. Grow up.

mark

someguy
22nd February 2004, 16:28
All I did was ask for help and I get your post mark well thank you if I had stuck this in the Bad budo or baffling budo I would have a least ten replies by now I put it here becuase I did value the opinoins in here more and the time difference between where I live and the bb time is about 8 hours jackoff.

Now the reason I posted here was becuase I needed help and if anyone every asked me how to check out any kind of Instructor or shihan or soke whatever, I send them here, I was just looking to get help from people who seem to bein the know on everything related to the Japanese martial arts

I spent five and a half years under Ted i was the highest ranking student in the state before I left, I need to know if He is a fake, the before mentioned decussions on this BB are what got me to think and start to question him and lead to my choice to leave. Sorry if your life is so full you can look at what i posted but not even try to help me.

James Fitzgerald

Mark Jakabcsin
22nd February 2004, 22:39
Originally posted by someguy
..... the time difference between where I live and the bb time is about 8 hours jackoff.

I stand corrected it was more than 24 hours, it was 29 hours 56 minutes between posts. Big deal. If it was 2 days, 2 weeks or 2 years between posts it still doesn't account for the child like crying you displayed. Cyberwhining is most annoying.


Originally posted by someguy
All I did was ask for help and I get your post mark well thank you if I had stuck this in the Bad budo or baffling budo I would have a least ten replies by now I put it here becuase I did value the opinoins in here more...

Ahhh, if all you wanted was replys and you know you can get 10 replys in other sections of the forum then you should post there. Comparing this section of E-budo to another is just down right dumb. Each sub forum has it's own feel and it's own members. Secondly, if you truly value the opinions of those that post here then you should have the patience and curtsy to wait for a reply instead of whining like a little.......(fill in the blank).



Originally posted by someguy
I spent five and a half years under Ted i was the highest ranking student in the state before I left, I need to know if He is a fake, the before mentioned decussions on this BB are what got me to think and start to question him and lead to my choice to leave.

Let me get this right, you spend 5+ years training with this guy and NOW you decide to see if he is for real? You wait 5+ years to check this guy out and now you can't wait more than 29 hours and 56 minutes for a reply? What the hell is the sudden rush?

Furthermore, you expecting others to do your research for you and expecting them to do it in less than 29 hours 56 minutes on a weekend. While you obviously don't have brains you got balls.


Originally posted by someguy
Sorry if your life is so full you can look at what i posted but not even try to help me.

My life is very full and very pleasant, thank you. What you fail to understand is no one on this forum or anywhere on the Internet is OBLIGATED to respond to you. Just because you have a question or a problem doesn't mean you can simply post it and expect others are required to help and respond, let alone in the time frame you establish. Once again I request you to grow up. Contrary to what your momma told you it ain't all about you.

mark

ps. If you are looking for dirt on a individual you really should post in the bad or baffling budo sections of this forum. That is why those forums exist.

John Lindsey
22nd February 2004, 22:48
Both you boys need to stop it right now or you will be gone. Do not call any member a jackass or jackoff or jack anything.

As for senso ryu, it appears from its website that it is neo-budo. Too much zen for me too. What exactly is his claims in regards to lineage?

John Lindsey
22nd February 2004, 22:51
Senso-ryu Aikijujutsu is a gendai form of jujutsu with "aiki" principles.

Ok, this quote is from his website. So, he did some jujutsu in the past and added aiki and some zen. So, it is just neo-budo and not to be confused with traditional Japanese martial arts.

I saw the picture of the Japanese fellow you mentioned, and I think it is a deceased Soke from Hakko-ryu maybe....

Nathan Scott
23rd February 2004, 04:49
Mr. Fitzgerald,

What an interesting thread you've brought to us here. I would also very much appreciate a better attitude if you continue to post. I would normally say something stronger, but John has already done so, and I'd like to give you the benefit of the doubt. I will nuke any other rude or antagonistic posts though, and if necessary, request administrative action from John.

For the record, I for one train a lot. Saturdays I typically train all day, and Sunday I give to my wife so I can get away with training the rest of the week. So I rarely check the forums or my email on the weekend, which is why I didn't reply yet or even know about your thread. As Mark said, you'll get a lot more help using courtesy than through posting demands.

As far as your question goes, I believe this is the image you are asking about:

<img src="http://www.aiki-jutsu.com/juidsl.jpg" border=0 height=155 width=120>

The image is titled "juidsl", which doesn't ring any bells with me. He does look familiar though, but I can't place who it might be. Perhaps someone else knows. Personally I like the photo of the white belts hanging up in the dojo with blood smeared all over them. Never thought of that. Mr. Fitzgerald, your name is on one of them - is this a "right of passage" for the newer students?:

http://www.aiki-jutsu.com/bloodybelts.JPG

As far as whether your training in "Senso ryu" was legitimate or not, that depends on what you think it is. If you think it is a classical Japanese art, then yes - something is funny. But he seems to be clear about what he is teaching and who is instructors are. "Aikijutsu/Aikijujutsu" has become a bit of a catch-all art name (in some usages at least). One could argue that anything that isn't Daito-ryu or at least derived/appear/feel like (same principles, waza, etc.) Daito-ryu is not "Aikijujutsu", but the fact is, people can define the name of their art however they like - whether we like it or not. I could teach my own art based on Judo techniques and call it Karate, and though it might be confusing to those who know what Karate is, there is nothing stopping me from call the art what I want (unless it is legally protected). I mean, what is "Taebo"?!?

What Mr. Hanulak, Behrens, and Roshi have to contend with is how they are perceived and accepted by their peers. I think the thread you refered to here on e-budo can give you a good idea what that might be.

But based on what I see on their webpage, I do not see anything legally or ethically wrong with what they are teaching. They do seem to teach pretty much everything (including tameshigiri - man, everyone is cutting these days!), but none of us can say how "effective" of authentic the techniques are over the net.

I'd say that if you benefited from the training, then perhaps just consider yourself fortunate and move on to something else? Further experience would be the best way to understand/evaluate what you were learning previously.

Regards,

Chris Li
23rd February 2004, 16:59
Originally posted by Nathan Scott

As far as your question goes, I believe this is the image you are asking about:

<img src="http://www.aiki-jutsu.com/juidsl.jpg" border=0 height=155 width=120>

The image is titled "juidsl", which doesn't ring any bells with me. He does look familiar though, but I can't place who it might be. Perhaps someone else knows.

Ryuho Okuyama (http://www.aikidojournal.com/new/article.asp?ArticleID=81).


Best,

Chris

Cady Goldfield
23rd February 2004, 17:40
Originally posted by Mark Jakabcsin
You write asking for help, wait LESS then 24 hours and then cry like a 6 year old girl that no one helped responded.


Hey, I resent that! I didn't cry that easily as a 6-year-old! :p

What is with the blood on those belts?? I've never seen that before at a dojo or anywhere. I'm curious about this school.

Mark Jakabcsin
23rd February 2004, 18:17
Originally posted by Cady Goldfield
Hey, I resent that! I didn't cry that easily as a 6-year-old! :p



Sorry Cady, no offense intended. :D I guess I need to work on being more PC. It ain't going to be easy. :(

Take care,
mark j.

someguy
23rd February 2004, 18:34
When i first started at the Aikijutsu Academy it had a ranking system like this


novice: a white gi with a white belt

intermediate: a black gi with the same white belt

porbaionary black belt : black gi and a black belt

Shodan: black gi black belt under Hakkama
and then first dan to tenth dan
now he has given up the Dan ranking for a Menkyo system.

Menkyo Shodan: begining transmission of the higher princples or medaphisical parts of the arts like controls, pulsing etc.

Menkyo Okudan: Has mastered the higher parts of the art and can demonstrait them in a multiple attack and so has mastered multipule attack.

menkyo Chudan: Has demonstraited the ability and wish to teach the art.

and Menkyo Kaiden: head of the system. to be given out after his death or retirement.

So the white belt you have you carry til your a black belt or about three years in that three years you take a lot of beatings in a mutliple attacker set up which is what the system is based on. They go full contact no pads for the black belt classes. I believe the sytem is very effective that is not what I'm questioning what i'm question is the Zen part of the art. Enio Sotou Roshi(roshi means Zen master} who also taught at first Ted said Aikijutsu but just called it AIkijutsu then he said he taught a rough form of ju jutsu and now he just taught Zen.This is where my questions come from the changing of the stories about Sotou Roshi. If it is a picture fo Sotou Roshi then great when I teach, if also choose to teach Senso Ryu, then i can do so and if i wish to return to study more i can with piece of mind.

James Fitzgerald

ps when a student hit you and made you bleed you put your blood on his belt but do to concerts about aids,now you put your blood on your belt. Ted told me i could teach i had the ability but he would never formally give me permission to do so, unless i returned and spent another five years with him. but that is beside the point. Ted always said Senso Ryu was more of what he learned from behrens who started teaching Senso Aikijutsu in 1964 before it was a buzz word even Aikido was not very common.

chrismoses
23rd February 2004, 19:01
"ps when a student hit you and made you bleed you put your blood on his belt but do to concerts about aids,now you put your blood on your belt. Ted told me i could teach i had the ability but he would never formally give me permission to do so, unless i returned and spent another five years with him. but that is beside the point."

Gee that sounds healthy. That's got to be one of the grossest practices ever. Maybe you should find a school that isn't abusive before you catch some blood-borne pathogen. I vote for a move to Baffling Budo on this one. "Danger Will Robinson, Danger!"

Nathan Scott
23rd February 2004, 20:19
Mr. Fitzgerald,

I appreciate your reply, and your more tempered tone.

Thanks for the insight on the ranking structure, "bloody belts" tradition, and effectiveness of the school. First hand experience is helpful to hear.

I've never been able to find a picture of this "Roshi", or much information on him, so I understand your hesitation. However, the question would be better directed to Mr. Behrens, since this is who Mr. Hanulak claims to have been trained under. I've never been able to find anything concrete out about "Roshi" (which sounds like it may be a Zen name, not a given name), or what qualifications he has/had to teach "Aikijutsu".

It seems to me that students of Mr. Hanulak and Mr. Behrens are well within their rights to ask them about their teachers, and request to see letters/photos/menjo, etc. On the other hand, if these instructors are not willing to produce such things to the satisfaction of students, they are welcome to train elsewhere under instructors who are more forthcoming about their background.

Senso-ryu advertised as an art that is modern, and headed up by Mr. Hanulak here in the US. You say that it is effective, and it sounds as though you value the training. So if I understand you, your only reservation is about your teacher's teacher, and perhaps where the methods are derived from. If you are thinking of pursuing the art further, then I understand why you would be wishing to find out more about this. But otherwise, I don't see anything clearly "wrong".

Unless they are clearly making false claims, I for one would not be interested in spending my own time finding out more about this subject, as I have no vested interest in the art or the history.

On the other hand, if you find out anything that you think would be useful for prospective students of either of these instructors/arts to know, please feel free to post it here.

Good luck,

kokumo
23rd February 2004, 21:35
Nathan --

Though I suspect you know as much, it should be noted that "Roshi" is common title given to senior zen monks that is no more a clue to the individual's identity than "Shihan" would be to that of a particular martial arts instructor.

Best,

Fred Little

A.J. Bryant
23rd February 2004, 22:11
So, is Mr. Hanulak claiming this is a picture of his former teacher (Soto), since it's hanging beside Mr. Behrens in one picture of the kamiza? Or, does he claim a connection to Hakko-ryu in some way? Just curious.

When I first came upon Mr. Hanulak's website in the early 90's, there was a clear connection made to Daito-ryu aikijujutsu and Sokaku Takeda (Soto was said to have been a student--or his father was). Then, the history became that this Soto passed the "Senso-ryu" to Hanulak. Recently, it has slowly shifted to be the sole creation of Mr. Hanulak, based upon his studies with Mr. Behrens...

To all this I say fine, just be honest about what it is you do--not only to yourself, but to your students at the very least.

Chuck.Gordon
25th February 2004, 09:28
Heya James, Andy ...

James, we corresponded a bit some time ago, if you remember. I expressed some concern about Ted's teachings and presentation at that time because I was leaving the Indy area and wanted to make recommendations for my students to find good teachers should they choose to train under another system.

I found Hanulak's history less than digestible and noted that he'd actually changed the tale more than once. I have no idea what his actual physical curriculum is like, in terms of effectiveness or anything else, but have spoken with people who have observed classes and who were former students and none told me anything that made me feel comfortable sending my students anywhere near him.

I searched long and hard to try to find any veracity in the alleged history of Senso Ryu and came up pretty much barren, except for his connection with Behrens.

The ONLY references I could come up with for Enio Soto (Roshi or not) pointed to a gentleman who was Puerto Rican and who sold insurance for a living. In Florida, oddly enough.

I also contacted a couple of American and international Zen organizations who disavowed any knowedge of Enio Soto Roshi (one such org was aggrieved that anyone called themselves Roshi without proper connections) or Ted Hanulak.

If the man has something to teach, I say teach it and let it stand or fall on its own merits.

Creating histories to make it sexier or more mysterious is specious and unethical, at best, and criminal, at worst. If I create a false company, and then sell services from that company, money is exchanged, etc ... is that not fraud?

Yet, in the budo community, we all too often sit back and let that very thing occur, time and time again.

Personally, I find the bloody belt thing a bit morbid and unsettling. Hard training is one thing, what apears to be blatant disregard for health, welfare and safety is another entirely.

That just reinforces my discomfort with Hanulak's organization, his background and character. He may well be an amazing fighter, but the framework he's created in which to teach what he knows is off-putting and makes it hard to take anything he would have to say seriously.

Take care, do your research, move on and get yourself into a good dojo.

Speaking of which ...

Andy,

Hope all's well with you and yours, hated missing you when we were in Indy in November. Next time, we'll swing sticks together, hopefully!

Chuck

(edited for spelling -- haven't had nearly enough coffee in cold Bavaria this morning)

T. Hanulak
29th February 2004, 18:03
I've decided that this one time I'm going to respond to this thread. I haven't in the past because it's silly to defend myself against people that judge me solely off of a website. This time is the final exception. The situation with my ex-student has been taken care of. I've personally corresponded with Nathan Scott, which I have also done in the past, and he and I have an understanding about the nature of "ex-students" and what they are capable of.

What I take offense to even more than an ex-student's sour grape ramblings is from this Chuck Gordon person who apparently fashions himself the "Official researcher for all that is Zen" You have the nerve to question my "Character"? Who do you think you are? I have been in Indianapolis for over 5 years, where you have lived that whole time up until you move to Germany or where ever you are. I teach 7 days a week, 2 hour classes and I have never met you. Perhaps you have sent "spies" to our dojo but we only look at them as "potential students". I have sent you e-mails that you NEVER respond to. But then you have the audacity to post public posts about my dojo and my character. You have spoken to ex-students of mine? Big deal. I have spoken to ex-students of yours and I couldn't of cared less.(trust me, their comments didn't flatter your so-called "club") You warn them to stay away from me? What are you nuts? this borders on slander. As far as Enio Sotou goes, he was just a man teaching Zen out of his home. Why isn't he listed in whatever YOU "checked out", I don't know and I don't care.

I studied Senso-Ryu Aikijutsu from a man named Richard Behrens. I am now teaching what I learned. It is a very effective martial art of self defense. It is a modern form, not a koryu system. Is it different than other forms?, of course. Behrens was calling it Aikijutsu 20 years ago and beyond. We did not jump on the "Aikijutsu" band wagon that happened with the advent of the internet. Is what I teach true "Aikijutsu", well I'm not sure what that is but if Daito-Ryu is the only example, then I guess we are not, thatís why I describe it as Jujutsu with aiki principles.

If anyone would like to ask us a question or make statement, please feel free to e-mail us at aikijutsu@comcast.net. If you only do it on this public board, you don't really want to know anything about us, you just want to gossip. I will not respond to any more posts. I wish you all luck in your perspective martial arts. If any of you find yourself in Indianapolis, please stop by our dojo. We are not exactly hiding.

Nathan Scott is the only person who had the common decency to call me once. That I respect.

Ted Hanulak
Senso-Ryu Aikijutsu

A.J. Bryant
1st March 2004, 13:58
Just to clarify,

Chuck can speak for himself but I will say that he's been teaching in Indianapolis (Ft. Harrison) for a long time.

Besides being a fine person, He's an excellent budoka who's orchestrated many seminars here in the city, ranging from top ranked koryu instructors to national Aikido seminars. He's also not afraid to travel the globe to train with the very best (Meik & Diane Skoss, Karl Friday, etc.).

Regards,

Chuck.Gordon
1st March 2004, 15:31
First, thanks for the kind words Andy.

As for me, I taught in Indy from 1988 through 2002, always running a small operation, not much in the public eye. My students and former students, however, are all as near to family as they can be.

I trained with, and welcomed onto my mat, anyone who was friendly and respectful and interested in an honest interaction and good budo training. To my good fortune, that list of folks includes many of the Indianapolis budo community, and more from the Midwest, ultimately it also includes folks from all over North America and Europe.

Second, let me welcome Ted to the boards. You and Senso Ryu have been the topic of conversation here from time to time and I think it takes a lot of guts for you to stand up here and deal with the comments.

That said, I find your tone in this note very different from the personal note you sent me (which I answered this morning, by the way, apologies for not getting it answered sooner, but I am recovering from a minor surgical procedure and hadn't spent much time online the past several days).

As for you having sent me notes in the past, I answered anything you sent me. Check your records or check with the students who were managing your e-mail and site.

I'm sure there may be some of my former students who didn't like what we were doing, but I suspect they're few and far between. If I ran into folks with whom there was no 'sympatico' or for whom I felt my system had little to offer, I readily referred them elsewhere. No one trained in my dojo who didn't want to. I also kept pretty good records of who I taught over the years. If you'd like, send me the names of folks you talked to and I can verify whether they actually were my students at any time.

I never taught very many folks, for one, and for another, as I said, my dojo has always been an extended family and there are very few people who have trained with me who didn't stay the course, barring job changes, school or moves. I keep in touch with many of those folks today, and in fact, have a whole slew of 'dojo grandkids' ...

And no, I'm no official researcher for all that is Zen, and I don't actually care much for, much less practice Zen myself. However, Zen (as opposed to zen, a more generic term) is a specific religious practice that is overseen by a specific hairarchy of lay and ordained ministry and authority. If someone claims to be teaching Zen, there ought to be a connection to and paper trail for their authority to do so.

The Japanese are really, really big on documentation and keep records fanatically ...

As I said before, what you're teaching (combatives and meditation) might be great, I don't know and I have been very specific that I cannot comment on that, not having seen you personally. And quite frankly, I don't care. If you're happy with it and your students are gaining something positive from it, then that's a Good Thing.

However, it's the format in which your system has been presented (on the web and in personal interaction with folks I've spoken with) that makes folks who have done their research and know something about the Japanese martial arts (and Zen) raise an eyebrow.

I stand by my comment: Teach what you teach and let it stand on its own merits. If it's good, and your students are the better for the learning, then it will stand on its own. It's not necessary to foster a false or even a questionable mythology to glamorize or justify it.

And, in fact, I did try to call your number a few times while I was still in Indy and doing research for my students as I was preparing to leave. Never got through to you, unfortunately. Now, I shan't call you due to the cost of international phone time ...

Take good care.

Chuck

daesim
30th November 2005, 15:55
I was reading through a few martial arts forums the other day just for the heck of it, and I had decided to google my old instructor Ted Hanulak who teaches Senso Ryu Aiki-jutsu. It popped up these forums and as I read through them, I was really surprised by the hostility that was apparent in the postings directed against Mr. Hanulak and his school. I had no idea that aiki oriented arts could be so competitive and conflicting. What exactly has he done to engender such anger? He posts very little on sites such as these, and tends to make constructive comments. He's a private, personal man, and because he simply doesn't make a habit of sharing every aspect of his art with the public, does that somehow make him a fraud? His training is very traditional, and he only shares history of his ryu with people who have trained seriously for a number of years. You take a look at his website and accuse him of posturing, but all I see is a website. It's not an advertisement, it's simple information for people who want to learn a little something about his art. It's cake, it's general, it's no different from a simple phone listing that lets people know "yes there is an aiki-jutsu dojo in Indianapolis, here's where it is, here's what I teach." If you want serious information about his style, go ask him in person. Is the man supposed to drop everything he's doing at the last minute and go have a serious debate on the internet? Yeah I suppose being a south Florida policeman was nothing compared to having to handle a REAL threat from those dojo-busting internet Renmei! I trained at Mr. Hanulak's ( I call him "Mr. Hanulak" because it's easier to type then "Hanulak-Sensei") School for a year, and I have very real, very intense memories of it. It was very serious, very hardcore, but he'd always take the time to sit with us when we were done, joke around with us after training. He doesn't do this for money, his family does very well for itself. He does this because he wants to do it, to share something that forged him into a better person, and to give other people the opportunity to do the same for themselves. But at the same time, it's not like he's doing "Teddy Hanulaks Aiki-jutsu USA!" What is with people in this country? If someone goes around screaming for attention with a twelve foot long 7 inch wide black belt around his waist, we pay attention, but when someone quietly offers competent instruction with little publicity or advertising, we can't wait to debunk him and put him in his place. Judge the man by the way he lives his life (if you feel you have the right to judge him at all.) He has a fine family, a dedicated cadre of students who included during my time of training a State highway trooper, a bartender, and an active service Marine who later transfered to Afganistan. These are pretty tough fellows who know crap when they see it. They all trained respectfully under Mr. Hanulak, because they knew they were learning something worthwhile. So I ask, is it really nessasary to try to tear someone down who does good to his community? Why not level any angry criticisms at the real frauds who put their students life in danger with faulty profit driven teachings that help no one except themselves? The next time you see someone advertising "AKI-JITSU" ask yourself if you feel justified comparing a guy like that to Mr. Hanulak.

cxt
30th November 2005, 16:36
Unless I err, which is always possible--even probable at times.

The thread you refer to started in 2001--did not get much response till 2002--then died until 2004 when it got some posts--and has had no activity at all since March 2004.

But I just took a quick look--could have missed something.

Your teacher Mr. Hanulak also posted his views and opinions on the thread as well.

So its seems to me you logged on to re-open a topic loooonnnnggg since over and one that had the direct input and particiaption of Mr. Hanulak himself.

Seems kinda odd to me.

Always speaks well of a person willing to step up and defend his teacher--but as a suggestion you might try a bit more relaxed tone with the folks here.

After all Hanulak himself, personally, already took part in the discussion in question


Chris Thomas

daesim
30th November 2005, 17:00
[Part 2 ] In January of this year, a month after I began part-time employment at a place called "new Flix video" a sleazy little place on Laffeyette road in Indy I was robbed at gun point. The person doing this was a small nervous looking person, quite clearly out of his mind on something. I have some experience with people who were addicted to crystal meth and this guy fit the bill. Dirty clothing, wide red eyes, quick slurred speaking, very excited, very nervous. I was only working at this degrading little video store to make some quick money to cover my previous holiday spending, and along comes this meth freak with a huge gun to threaten my life over fifty dollars in the register. Happy new Year!

I stayed calm. One thing that Hanulak-Sensei has stressed over and over again is to stay in the moment, center yourself with deep breathing. He has said that fight or flight syndrome will affect everyone in a life-threatening situation, and what's important is that you don't let your urge to panic ( What he refers to as a monkey mind) take over. I stayed in the moment, I stayed calm. Unfortunately the robber didn't. I had already opened the register, I was standing back from him with my hands up, I wanted him to take the money and leave. Unfortunately for me, we weren't both on the same planet here. He was extremely paranoid, very quick to anger, and he would NOT leave. It became very obvious that this person was going to shoot me, and was working his way up to it, and that I was probably going to die if I didn't act. So I did. I cut directly to his left, and slammed my left shoulder as hard as I could into his center. I'm of considerable weight, so fair to say I sent him flying. As he fell back however, his gun went off and I was shot in my upper right thigh. I went crashing to the floor, expecting that to be it, but I was glad I put up a fight and grateful for my zen training. I wasn't afraid and I was glad. Lucky for me, the robber had had enough and took off screaming like a banshee. Pure luck and nothing else, because if he had stayed calm and centered, he could have finished me off quite easily, gotten the money, and gotten away. Anyway, I dragged myself over to the cordless phone called 911, and then used my belt as a tournequet for my right leg. I stayed calm, and I didn't think about what I was doing I just did it. I also called my store manager John Tommasi, and let him know that I had been shot and wounded and that I was going to the hospital. John in turn, thought I was playing a stupid prank until an officer arrived to inform him of what was happening. I was taken from the store directly to Wishard hospital where I recieved treatment. My name is Darrell Simmonds, and this is a matter of public record with the Indianapolis police department.

I have not trained at the Senso-ryu in four years, and I likewise have had no contact with Mr. Hanulak, but I have no reason to lie about my experience either. I credit Ted Hanulak fully with providing me with the training that saved my life. To me his Ryu and his Zen are as authentic as it will ever get. They passed a trial of fire so to speak. I now know that thanks to this man and his art, when the chips are down I can be relied upon to act, in defense of myself, or in defense of others and with that comes a feeling of appreciation and gratitude that I cannot express in words. Mr Hanulak has helped me to know myself, and what better honour can a Teacher ever give to a student?

Thank you for reading this. If I sounded disrespectful at all during my previous posting, please believe that it was not with the intent to antagonize or mock. Have a good day.

Darrell Simmonds.

Nathan Scott
1st December 2005, 03:59
I've merged the last three posts with an existing thread on the subject to facilitate future searches.

As far as surviving an attack, teachers are always happy to learn that their instruction and time has proved useful. I'd also say that there are many skilled and good teachers out there teaching a wide variety of arts, from classical arts to modern hybrid arts, to arts with questionable claims. The teacher's ability is not what the subject of this thread or discussion is about, FWIW.

Speaking in general about a pet peeve (of mine at least), people in general always seem to bring up the fact at some point that a given teacher has taught special forces, CIA, police, etc. I've got to tell you, from my experience, this doesn't mean squat. Many times that just means someone joined the dojo or took a seminar, and other times it's just BS to sound more impressive. But even when it is true, goverment agencies are not known for carefully selecting the most practical and well thought out arts or teachers to teach them. If you are good at selling yourself, and have a connection, you can teach government agencies. Or, just say you did.

My experience has also been that professionals (LEO, Military, etc.) tend to not to train much and don't usually make the most serious students. In the dojo, they tend to be aggressive at "dishing it out", but are not nearly as enthusiastic to "recieve". They also expect to get discounts, special treatment, and are absent from training often. Yeah, I realize that this broad generalization does not include ALL those LEO/Military budo-ka out there, and I've also encountered many who were serious students and good technicians. But in general, the above has been my observation. In other words, new students to martial arts might believe that anyone who has or is teaching LEO/military has got it all going on, but I suspect that most who have been involved for a while find such information, as they say, "mildly interesting". No disrespect intended towards anyone, just felt like it was time to call this subject for what it is!

Before anyone gets upset, don't get me wrong. I have the utmost respect for LEO and military, etc. Yes, I've taught them too, and continue to do so (quiet guys...), so don't misunderstand the above to mean that I'm against them or against teaching them. Hell, if anyone really needs the training, or has a "right" to the training, it's them. I'm just pointing out that, IMHO, including this point in your resume like it is a credential or trophy is a bit pointless to those in the peer group.

Anyway, with regards to this thread Mr. Simmonds, I appreciate your posts and your passion to defend your ex-instructor. All opinions are welcome here. I'm sorry you don't understand why such discussions take place on forums such as these, but the reasons have already been stated previously so there is no use in bringing it up again.

Regards,

daesim
2nd December 2005, 16:54
Mr. Scott, I understand why the previous postings took place, I was simply annoyed to discover that the general postings were almost overwhelmingly negative in regards to Mr. Hanulaks school. If I were a newcomer to martial arts training and decided to google Mr. Hanulaks name before I called to set up an appointment, I'd most likely come to this forum, and in reading the opinions of this forum I'd likely believe that Mr. Hanulak was some hack Steven Seagle/wannabe teaching a junk art. It seemed fair to me to write something positive about the man because what he taught me really helped me out, and I have a few good memories about my training at his dojo. It's not so much that I'm impassioned about defending the man, as that I'm interested in telling people the simple truth. His zen training works. His martial arts training works. If I know for a fact that something works, I tell people about it. He's the real deal sir. If you observe him, you'll see for yourselves. I know I'm not going to get the last word in on this though, but I thought I'd try :).

Have a good day.

someguy
5th August 2008, 02:16
I have thought about this for some time did a lot of Zazen and feel that to close this chapter I have to do this. If I post this the thread is up again and thus the debate comes back into the light if I don't....then I'm not doing what I feel compelled too. I'm not apologizing for how I felt, or what I did, I think any student should be able to question anything about his teacher, or their history. I'm apologizing for how I did it, I wish to express my deep regret at how I openly and Publicly called my former teacher a fake. :nw:


Hanulak Sensei did teach me a lot and I'm great full for that, he is a good guy
and what he teaches is good stuff I believe. I haven't been back to the Hombu in five years, Until this past Friday I apologized to Hanulak Sensei in person and now this is the last thing I need to do.


1. I apologize to His Family, very deeply, He didn't deserve what I did.

2. To My training Partners I'm sorry for not standing with you when I should have.

3. To the present students for calling there teacher a fake.

4. lastly to Hanulak Sensei I'm sorry for breaking the first rule of friendship not believing you, and believing my teacher.


You all might think I'm stupid and crazy and foolish, and what ever else but
I think I can now be done with this stuff, I have given up the research it doesn't matter to me anymore.:wave:

Later:beer: cheers
James Fitzgerald

someguy
21st August 2008, 20:25
I have thought about this for some time did a lot of Zazen and feel that to close this chapter I have to do this. If I post this the thread is up again and thus the debate comes back into the light if I don't....then I'm not doing what I feel compelled too. I'm not apologizing for how I felt, or what I did, I think any student should be able to question anything about his teacher, or their history. I'm apologizing for how I did it, I wish to express my deep regret at how I openly and Publicly called my former teacher a fake. :nw:


Hanulak Sensei did teach me a lot and I'm great full for that, he is a good guy
and what he teaches is good stuff I believe. I haven't been back to the Hombu in five years, Until this past Friday I apologized to Hanulak Sensei in person and now this is the last thing I need to do.


1. I apologize to His Family, very deeply, He didn't deserve what I did.

2. To My training Partners I'm sorry for not standing with you when I should have.

3. To the present students for calling there teacher a fake.

4. lastly to Hanulak Sensei I'm sorry for breaking the first rule of friendship not believing you, and believing my teacher.


You all might think I'm stupid and crazy and foolish, and what ever else but
I think I can now be done with this stuff, I have given up the research it doesn't matter to me anymore.:wave:

Later:beer: cheers
James Fitzgerald
I just want to clearify I did my last post to say I forgive him and I just want to put this behind me. It was brought to my attention that I wasn't very clear, so to clearify again

I not sorry for questioning him or the history of the art or his histroy, I'm not asking to return or returning to his Dojo, and I'm only sorry for not questioning him in person instead of over the internet.