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Go]{u
6th August 2002, 23:07
I want to know if any of you think you can become a good martial artist at home by reading books etc or do you think that you have to be in some kind of institution

Personally I prefer learning by myself I can learn at my own speed not keeping to just one style of fighting and I have my own thoughts and ideas rather than them being given to me, I have been to a lot of schools and never really got on there
Well thatís my opinion I want to hear what everyone else thinks
Before you answer
I would like you to keep in mind that martial arts was first made by actual people and not learnt in a school
not that im tryign to change your mind or anything ;)

David T Anderson
7th August 2002, 02:19
The martial arts are complex physical skills that have to be practiced and taught. You can't learn to ballroom dance or play golf or play basketball by reading books...

Amir
7th August 2002, 10:57
I donít believe you can get to any serious level at home. Itís true, M.A. were developed once by someone, but so was the wheel. And both have developed significantly since then. Further, the developers of most current M.A. have learnt more then one M.A. themselves and their new art is in fact their contribution and improvement of their studies, sometimes through a more structured way of teaching, some times through the emphasis of some principles, others thorough a more spiritual conception etc.
Learning from books is generally less then recommended. The only exceptions being if you are a well trained M.A.tist in a similar method and check the ideas you got from the book with other similar students.
Some things can not be learned without direct contact, at least not for a non-genius exception (yes there are a few of those too). Even as a student learning under a teacher I would say there is great difference between understanding something with your conscious mind and knowing it with you unconscious body. A teacher can help you in both stages and see your mistakes from the side. No videocassette can do that nor book, and neither is equal to 5 minutes of working hand to hand with your teacher after you have progressed some in the art.
M.A. is less a matter of technique and more a matter of a certain set of principles for confrontation handling that the study of techniques (and other practices) is supposed to assist us in gaining. One must internalize these principles, this can not be achieved unless you practice a lot, and do it in a correct attitude and mind set. The teacher is essential here as well.
All the above assumes you can get a good teacher.

Amir

Go]{u
7th August 2002, 11:04
I will further explain what I meant
When I say train at home I do mean train I donít just mean read books
I am not too bad at golf actually ;) but i have never had a lesson or been to a school

For some people school is not an option like myself I have been to many schools and lessons I have yet to find a good school so do I stop training until I do find one and some people actually live no where near a school I donít think it should mean that they have to give up the art just because of where they live

Another problem I have with schools is when you go to a new one you have to start from white belt all over again and you are treated like one specially when you are learning a new art
Donít get me wrong Iím not all against schools I just think that at least there should be an alternative

Mike Williams
7th August 2002, 11:55
Originally posted by Go]{u
For some people school is not an option like myself I have been to many schools and lessons I have yet to find a good school so do I stop training until I do find one and some people actually live no where near a school I donít think it should mean that they have to give up the art just because of where they live

This is currently being debated in the Baffling Budo forum (in the 'Learn to Beat Any Attacker with, Black Belt Home Study Course' thread)
I will say what others there have said: If you can't find a local school for your style - switch styles until you can!! You will get far more from crosstraining in a different MA than you would from trying to cobble something together yourself.
If you can't find any MA locally at all, you'll just have to be prepared to travel. It's not much of a scrifice to make, surely?


Another problem I have with schools is when you go to a new one you have to start from white belt all over again and you are treated like one specially when you are learning a new art


So what? Why shouldn't you be? Could this attitude have something to do with you not fitting in at the dojos you have attended?

Finally, please could you sign all of your posts with your full, real name. It's the rules.

Cheers,

Mike

TyroneTurner
7th August 2002, 16:49
Good day all. I say both. First of all, you definitely need to attend a school. Use your time and home to practice drills, exercise etc. Also, watch videos.

For instance, as a stand-up Jujutsu guy, I have been drilled in various throws. However, I feel that I didn't "get it" until reviewing Tim Cartmell's EFFORTLESS COMBAT THROWS. I also got a lot of mileage out of Bob Orlando's INDONESIAN FIGHTING FUNDAMENTALS. I really like the blocking and striking drills. The foot techniques are great too.

Sometimes, an explanation from a different personality other than your sensei really helps things to sink in.

Again, one MUST attend a school. How else, can you test your stuff (i.e. sparring, randori, etc.)? You don't want to experiment in the street now do you? ;-)

Wishing you much success,

Tyrone Turner
Queens, NY
http://www.tyroneturner.com

INFINOO
7th August 2002, 18:41
Go}{u: Good question, Do you mind posting your real name on E-Budo?

Regards,

Gregory Rogalsky
Rogalsky Combatives International

HinodeBuddha
8th August 2002, 02:22
"I would like you to keep in mind that martial arts was first made by actual people and not learnt in a school"

Individuals did develop martial arts in the beginning. The school then was the battlefield. If you developed something good you were able to live and if you developed something not so good then hopefully you got lucky and lived so that you could reevaluate your methods.

From the "battlefield school" the arts were also taught to the children of the family.

In the beginning there may not have been the formalized school as we know it today, but those were different times than today. Somethings however do not change. That is the value of a good instructor.

Books and videos make awesome study aids, but without an experienced quality instructor to guide you they will mean nothing. It is true that you can learn from these aids, but you will lack the experience needed when it comes to the aplication of what you learn.

Enough Said[B][I]

red_fists
8th August 2002, 02:36
Originally posted by Go]{u
Another problem I have with schools is when you go to a new one you have to start from white belt all over again and you are treated like one specially when you are learning a new art
Don?t get me wrong I?m not all against schools I just think that at least there should be an alternative

The alternative to schools is a private instructor.

AS for starting of in a new school from scratch, I am about to do that.

I am changing from my current Tai Chi
style to a new Tai Chi style.

Haaah, you say Tai Chi is Tai Chi is Tai Chi.
Not so, my current style uses large frame where as the new one is small frame, Stances, Power Generation, Forms & Hand positions also differ slightly but enough to make a difference.
My current style is all performed at the same speed, the new style mixes fast and slow movements.
Add onto that my current style was supplemented with 2 other styles.

So, yes, I have to learn the basics of the new system as they differ from my current one.
Hopefully knowledge of my current style will help me and thus I might be able to go through the ranks a bit faster than an absolue beginner, or I might have to unlearn habits that inhibit progress in the new style.

Peace.