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JudoJack
19th August 2000, 02:15
Greetings All!

I would like to select a miserly 10 books related to judo or budo - "the cream of the crop" - that would be valuable over the long term for an aspiring budoka. From the annotated bibliographies I have encountered, much of the list below looks promising. However, I have only just begun selecting potential titles, so any comments, deletions or substitutions would be appreciated - as would limiting your own list to only ten top picks also.


1. Best Judo


2. Book Of Five Rings (The)
by Miyamoto Musashi, transl. by Nihon Services Corporation

3. Budoshoshinshu: The Warrior's Primer Of Daidoji Yuzan
translated by William Scott Wilson

4. Father Of Judo (The): A Biography Of Jigoro Kano
by Brian N. Watson and Yukimitsu Kano (Not Yet Published)

5. Hagakure: The Book Of The Samurai
by Yamamoto Tsunetomo, translated by William Scott Wilson

6. Kodokan Judo
by Jigoro Kano

7. Musashi
by Eiji Yoshikawa, translated by Charles S. Terry

8. Sword And The Mind (The)
by Yagyu Munenori, translated by Hiroaki Sato

9. Unfettered Mind (The): Writings Of The Zen Master To...
by Takuan Soho, translated by William Scott Wilson

10. Warrior Of Zen: The Diamond-Hard Wisdom Of Suzuki Shosan
edited, translated, and introduced by Arthur Braverman


Thanks for your help!

P.S. Perhaps drawing up a list with fully half the books specifically on Judo and an equal half being more broadly "budo" based would be a better scheme. But feel free to make your list consist of all judo books, if you wish, or include whatever else you see fit, such as, Chuang-Tzu, Confucius, Lao-Tzu, Mencius, etc.

MarkF
19th August 2000, 10:02
Well, as for judo, and there is nothing wrong with adding judo books to a budo collection, but one which you will probably have trouble finding, considering that an orginal just sold at auction for nearly three-hundred dollars, but

Mifune, K. A Cannon of Judo

Also, I would attempt to find an original of Kodokan Judo. Remember that this contains little written by Kano himself, but there are some photos of him doing some advanced waza. This was released by the Kodokan with many contributors, and the newest has even more. This was basically a manual written by members of the Kodokan, and included Kodokan Goshin jutsu, which was certainly not by Kano, but it is a good book for "waza tampering.":)

I had heard Y. Kano was doing a biography so it will be interesting as to how good it really is this far removed from the source. This has never stopped the Kodokan before, however.

And one more you may wish to add is Martial Musings by Robert W. Smith. Actually, this is a great book and fun to read. Good judo stuff, too.

Mark

Joseph Svinth
19th August 2000, 10:16
Any list is subjective, but for dozens of the best reviews of judo books available, try http://www.bstkd.com

Personally I'd get replace one of the books on samurai philosopy with E.J. Harrison, The Fighting Spirit of Japan (Woodstock, NY: Overlook Press, 1982) . After all, Kano's father-in-law was a neo-Confucian scholar rather than a Buddhist, and as a result Zen really didn't much influence on the development of judo.

I also am not sure that the Nihon Services Corporation translation of Musashi is best. The introduction to the Harris translation is flawed, but the translation is okay. See http://www.uoguelph.ca/~iaido/bookreviews.koryuken.htm Note, however, that if you are insistent on ten books that you can combine Musashi and Yagyu by buying the Cleary translation. This presumes you also buy his "Japanese Art of War" and so is problematic. Your alternative is not buyin Musashi at all but instead reading the various online pirate versions.

JudoJack
20th August 2000, 21:06
Greetings MarkF!


Well, as for judo, and there is nothing wrong with adding judo books to a budo collection, but one which you will probably have trouble finding, considering that an orginal just sold at auction for nearly three-hundred dollars, but Mifune, K. A Cannon of Judo

Indeed there is nothing wrong with judo as budo. I am a rather philosophical person, this partly explains why my tentative list contains more books on the philosophical side of things. The "Budo" of martial arts is something that I got a taste of as a young karateka. Having maintained an on again off again interest in martial arts, eastern and western philosophy and religious thought, I find myself turning to budo for ethical direction and judo to satisfy my lifelong interest in self-defence. Having had a brief introduction to judo about 25 years ago and some recent Aikido instruction, I should probably include more judo books in my fanciful "desert island" list of books I would like to study over the long term. Likely one may not go too far wrong with the classics in this area, but I doubt I should be able to acquire K. Mifune's "A Cannon of Judo" in the near future.


Also, I would attempt to find an original of Kodokan Judo. Remember that this contains little written by Kano himself, but there are some photos of him doing some advanced waza. This was released by the Kodokan with many contributors, and the newest has even more. This was basically a manual written by members of the Kodokan, and included Kodokan Goshin jutsu, which was certainly not by Kano, but it is a good book for "waza tampering.":)

Please clarify the above. What is the advantage of the first edition over my 1994 paperback edition. I have some familiarity with the business of first editions and the used book trade, so I recognize such values, but what difference might I benefit from by also consulting the earlier version?


I had heard Y. Kano was doing a biography so it will be interesting as to how good it really is this far removed from the source. This has never stopped the Kodokan before, however.

Yes my tentative inclusion of it in my imaginative list was rather optimistic, but I would like to have a single source on Jigoro Kano from which to draw inspiration. (This is the idea behind including the "fictionalized historical" novel on Musashi, to find inspiration in a story even though it is only loosely based on historical events and characters.) Actually I am not altogether sure what will actually make my list. It is an exercise that is useful for development (I work as a library technician, but also as a bookseller - it is my business to become acquainted with the better books in those subject areas that I have a passion for).


And one more you may wish to add is Martial Musings by Robert W. Smith. Actually, this is a great book and fun to read. Good judo stuff, too.

Thank you, I will consider it. I have seen that book but I have yet to crack it open for a preliminary examination. What of Trevor Leggett's two books, The Spirit Of Budo(?) and The Dragon Mask & Other Stories, would you place much value on these for the kind of limited list I am trying to estabish for myself and from which I will endeavour to seriously study and ruminate on?

By the way, I have been reading archives that include your contributions and I am very grateful for being able to read your informed opinion. Moderate on MarkF!

JudoJack
20th August 2000, 22:45
Greetings Joseph Svinth!


Any list is subjective, but for dozens of the best reviews of judo books available, try http://www.bstkd.com

Yes, that has been one source for my research so far. I posted here to try to elicit some members top ten list (it helps reduce the large selection represented on other sites), but I understand that it can be alot of work and not everybody's cup of tea to sit down and think it through. Thank you for the reference, and for your second internet address, one that I had not already been to.


Personally I'd get replace one of the books on samurai philosopy with E.J. Harrison, The Fighting Spirit of Japan (Woodstock, NY: Overlook Press, 1982) .

I will seek it out to consider it for inclusion. I do think that I read an excerpt from a book by Harrison in the anthology "The Martial Arts Reader".


After all, Kano's father-in-law was a neo-Confucian scholar rather than a Buddhist, and as a result Zen really didn't much influence on the development of judo.

Yes I have considered that, as well as some likely influence from Lao-Tzu. Nevertheless, like the occasional point of debate among karateka stating that modern Okinawan karate developed or gelled in a Confucian milieu rather a Zen Buddhist environment (which some insist was an influence due to the purported Shaolin influence linked in the developmental stages of the art - residual perhaps), I don't trouble myself too much with establishing an accurate rendering since mine is a general interest in budo from the larger Samurai tradition. Mind you I am still contemplating the inclusion of The Analects Of Confucius in my personal cannon, but also the Lao-Tzu. I will leave it to qualified scholars to convince me, or not, of when, where, how, and how much influence a given intellectual current made its mark (during a given period and place) upon a martial art or way of life.


I also am not sure that the Nihon Services Corporation translation of Musashi is best. The introduction to the Harris translation is flawed, but the translation is okay. See http://www.uoguelph.ca/~iaido/bookreviews.koryuken.htm

I will reconsider translation. What I have read of my copy is hard to get used to, using many original language terms rather than translated equivalents, and I expect I should like the Harris version best. I probably read some of Harris' text in a library copy I have access to and which I have consulted (my local library has a couple of editions by different translators). Again, thanks for the informative link!


Note, however, that if you are insistent on ten books that

Okay then I'll up it to twelve! ;)


you can combine Musashi and Yagyu by buying the Cleary translation. This presumes you also buy his "Japanese Art of War" and so is problematic. Your alternative is not buyin Musashi at all but instead reading the various online pirate versions.

Please clarify the above. I have recently read Cleary's "The Japanese Art Of War" which includes commentary on "The Book Of Five Rings" and some discussion of Takuan Soho, Yagyu Munenori, and Suzuki Shoshan (hence my interest in the title: The Warrior Of Zen). I don't recall it as being really a translation Miyamoto Musashi and Yagyu Munenori except for relevant passages under discussion. Did Cleary translate Musashi and Yagyu as a whole. Were you referring to a work or works other than his "The Art Of Japanese War"? By the way I think this Cleary book is an excellent read, in fact it has fired my interest to try to make my own sense of the relative merits of the historical figures he discusses. This is partly why "The Unfettered Mind: Writings Of The Zen Master To The Sword Master", "The Sword & The Mind", and "Warrior Of Zen: The Diamond-Hard Wisdom Mind Of Suzuki Shoshan", along with Musashi's book, have made onto my list. But the alternative to my self-limiting endeavour need not have me resort to online versions, I can simply include them in my collection, but outside of the ten or twelve books I would like to concentrate on and reread every year.

I look forward to your response, and appreciate the part your have taken in discussion. Read you later!

MarkF
21st August 2000, 09:51
Hi Jack,
I'm sorry but I don't remember whether it were you or not, but someone asked about the works of Trevor Leggett? He passed away on August 1,2000, and I would definitely recommend his works, as to his judo, and to Zen (I just don't have time at the moment to go backand search).

I first became interested in his work, not for the judo, but for the philosophy of Zen Buddhism, something I was touching on early in my judo training, so here you have a little of both. Actually a lot of both. He was one of the premiere judo teachers at the Budokwai ( http://www.budokwai.org ) and in later years, through the Kano Society ( http://www.kanosociety.org ). I haven't read nearly all of what he offered, but I can say this is where judo and philsophy meet.

The reason for reading, if you can, the original of Kodokan Judo basically is it is a big step closer to the source, and not as many contributors so you do get more of the "essence" of it, without all the changes, though all are not in the paperback either. It was also the first inclusion of Kodokan Goshin jutsu, estabished as goshin jutsu no kata, and good self-defense to more modern weapons. I have to be very careful with my copy as I left it in storage too long and it is becomeing a bit worn, and pages torn, but, well, call me sentimental. No, there is nothing wrong with the newer edition. I bought it:D

Thanks for your kind words,

Sincerely,
Mark

BTW: The work(s) of Kawaishi are highly recommended, and there is an early biography of J. Kano as well, but where to find them? Search, and when you are done, search some more. This is something which I wish had been hammered in at an earlier age, much earlier age:cry:

Joseph Svinth
22nd August 2000, 10:45
Jack --

For more bibliographic guidance, try this E-budo back link: http://204.95.207.136/vbulletin/showthread.php?threadid=495 The thread is called "Judo's history," and provides you a LONG list of things you can read. (I know, this assumes you have the Queen Mary delivering your box of books to the Desert Island, but hey, before you know the ten best, you gotta read the rest, right?)

Meanwhile, if you like Thomas Cleary (and yes, that was the book I was thinking of), then you should really like J.C. Cleary. Sample titles include:

-----. A Buddha from Korea: The Zen Teachings of T’aego (Boston: Shambhala, 1990)
-----. A Tune Beyond the Clouds: Zen Teachings from Old China (Berkeley, CA: Asian Humanities Press, 1990)
-----. Worldly Wisdom: Confucian Teachings of the Ming Dynasty (Boston: Shambhala, 1991)
-----. Zen Dawn: Early Zen Texts from Tun Huang (Boston: Shambhala, 1986)

There is some Leggett material at the JCbtSports site at http://ejmas.com -- go to "Great Enablers" on the nav bar and you'll see it. Leggett wrote well, and I think you'd like his books.

Also read Sun Tzu. I recommend the Griffith translation, at least to start with.

JudoJack
25th August 2000, 01:09
Hi MarkF,

I appreciate your follow up. Thanks for the additional information. I'll be sure to look all of this up. While I had already read the tributes to Mr. Leggett at the Kano Society website, I will have to visit the Budokwai website later.

Regards,

JudoJack
25th August 2000, 01:28
Originally posted by Joseph Svinth
Jack --

For more bibliographic guidance, try this E-budo back link: http://204.95.207.136/vbulletin/showthread.php?threadid=495 The thread is called "Judo's history," and provides you a LONG list of things you can read. (I know, this assumes you have the Queen Mary delivering your box of books to the Desert Island, but hey, before you know the ten best, you gotta read the rest, right?)

Meanwhile, if you like Thomas Cleary (and yes, that was the book I was thinking of), then you should really like J.C. Cleary. Sample titles include:

-----. A Buddha from Korea: The Zen Teachings of T’aego (Boston: Shambhala, 1990)
-----. A Tune Beyond the Clouds: Zen Teachings from Old China (Berkeley, CA: Asian Humanities Press, 1990)
-----. Worldly Wisdom: Confucian Teachings of the Ming Dynasty (Boston: Shambhala, 1991)
-----. Zen Dawn: Early Zen Texts from Tun Huang (Boston: Shambhala, 1986)

There is some Leggett material at the JCbtSports site at http://ejmas.com -- go to "Great Enablers" on the nav bar and you'll see it. Leggett wrote well, and I think you'd like his books.

Also read Sun Tzu. I recommend the Griffith translation, at least to start with.

Hi Joe!

Thanks for the links. I will pursue these leads at greater length than I have, so far, next week when I hope to have a bit more free time. Over the years I have read both Trevor Leggett and J.C. Cleary, but that does not mean it would not do me some good to read more from these authors. The latter's "Worldly Wisdom" came home with from the library, coincidentally, last week. I just "looked through it" as I have Griffiths translation of "Sun Tzu". I always keep an open eye and set time aside to investigate or reinvestigate books, but really I do have to stick a few choice volumes to try to sound the depths.

Thanks again!

MarkF
25th August 2000, 05:49
I know everyone is just adding to a very long list of what is good, but for some of the best judo books and budo in general, try this page: http://www.bstkd.com/judorev.htm . I just realized that someone else recommended the website I was about to do, so check the above page out and click on the area you want for the books you may take interest.

efb8th
1st September 2000, 22:21
Hi, Everybody,

Great thread!

Gotta haves: Dynamic Judo by K. Kudo (red and green books); G. Koizumi My Study of Judo.

More! More!

Ben_Holmes
14th September 2000, 04:35
I can't imagine that no-one has mentioned 'Judo A-Z' by Syd Hoare... (www.ippon-usa.com is the source) Ever since I picked it up I've been almost constantly referring to it. Since it's in alphabetical order, it's quicker to skim to a particular technique... of course, it's not much on detail... but it's excellent, nonetheless.

And, of course, the Masterclass series of books is outstanding... some better than others, but all of them are uniformly better than almost anything else out there. Similar to 'Vital Judo', but each book dedicated to a particular technique.

Judo Training Methods, reprinted recently... a must have!

Those are the ones you can get right now that are in my top 10...

Iain
14th September 2000, 06:10
Fighting judo by Katsuhiko Kashiwazaki (sp?)!!! best book I have read, get it out at your public library and give it a read yourself!

Iain Richardson

kusanku
14th September 2000, 06:30
Judo Jack-
My best reccomendation for a Judo Book is 'The Secrets Of Judo ' by Jiichi Watanabe and Lindy Avakian.
Tuttle, Paprback, pretty cheap, best book on how to make Judo work, and any martial art for that matter, that I ever read.

As for the secrets they give, they are the body dynamics underlying all effective combative movement, explained with diagrams, drawings, photographs, simple physics equatons, and explanations.

Not to be overlooked or missed.

I sed it as a supplementary text when I began formal Judo training back when, and made good progress, partly due to the book training my mind while the insructors trained the techniques.
It doesn't have the whole art as does Kodokan Judo, it doesn't go into exhaustive detail like Kazuzo Kudo's Dyamic Judo series(best tech works ever), but it does get to the core of Judo and in doing so, of all martial arts.