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EMitton
11th November 2002, 07:45
I recently rigged up a makiwara (not a real one; more like pads taped to the cinderblock wall of my dormitory room) and so far, I think it's great. It has really helped my form improve. However, I've heard rumors that makiwaras can lead to arthritis as you age. Is this true? Is there a way to avoid the joint problems? The simple fact is, the ability to type will probably be more important to me making a living than the ability to fight.

Any insight into this would be greatly appreciated. It seems like a great training aid, but I don't want to do something I'm going to really regret a few decades down the line.

Thanks,
Eric Mitton

Rogier
11th November 2002, 09:03
do a search of the forum with the word makiwara.. you'll find that it has been discussed before...

Ginko
11th November 2002, 16:07
The keys to makiwara trainig are: the proper amount of "give" to the makiwara & the proper training methods. Make sure that the makiwara is not overly stiff. The best instructional on how to use a makiwara can be found at:

http://www.dragon-tsunami.org/Tsunami/Pages/uchi2rev.htm

Bruce Mitchell
11th November 2002, 16:34
I would posit that a makiwara attached to a wall does not have the correct "give" and will damage your hands. My understanding from reading, and very limited use of a makiwara is that they are intended to develope coordinated movement of the body, and power, BUT not to "condition" your hands (although some conditioning does take place it is secondary to the goals of makiwara training).

You might want to suppliment your makiwara training with dexterity exercises for your hands (I've seen a book once this once, sorry, but I forget the title). Good luck with your training.

EMitton
11th November 2002, 17:01
Bruce: Thanks, that helps. I'll see if I can figure out how to make it give more. Unfortunately it will probably be quite a few years before I'm living in a house with a yard where I can build a proper, buried one. I definately am not using it to condition my hands, but instead to try to improve hip rotation and form.


Originally posted by Rogier
do a search of the forum with the word makiwara.. you'll find that it has been discussed before...

Rogier,

Both the thread "Is the makiwara still valid" and "Kotekitae and body hardening" were very interesting reads, but they touched on the possible health problems associated with makiwaras only glancingly. In the former, I was able to discern that jow may help harden bones, and vinegar is dangerous. But I couldn't find any info on proper makiwara construction or technique to avoid long-term problems (especially people's first-hand experiences with the health effects of long-term makiwara training).

Thanks,
Eric Mitton

Ginko
11th November 2002, 18:09
In the interenst of equal time, here is an anti-makiwara article:

http://www.24fightingchickens.com/shotokan/101/28_makiwara.html

Steven Malanosk
12th November 2002, 02:42
The makiwara, in name and design, is indigenous to Okinawa.

Yes, if there is no give, or too much give, it can cause problems.

Try the Chinese striking bag, that filled with sand, rice, beans, etc., mounted on the wall, collapses on impact, so as to absorb the strike, rather than inanimately resisting, thus sending a shock through your skeletal structure.

If you are not familiar with it, see some of the old pictures of Bruce Lee training at home.

Another idea, is if you are living in a decently built structure, nail a 2 by 6 across your window frame, and put the maki on the center. Never hit it with the window closed though.:eek:

As far as arthritis: Use the makiwara, as prescribed by a qualified know it all. Misuse it, and there is no warranty.

If your skeletal structure is not aligned, your askin for trouble.

Rogier
12th November 2002, 07:30
The makiwara, in name and design, is indigenous to Okinawa.

yes but many people tend to forget that these people also worked with their hands all day and they did so from a very young age. So their hands were already accustomed to some abuse..

The biggest abuse most people give their hands nowadays is typing the keyboard to hard or washing them to many times...