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View Full Version : Nepai and Ershibada, A real connection?



Paihequan
13th November 2002, 22:54
How many of you out there know of or practice the form Nepai???

Have any of you seen the Chinese version of this form (Ershibada) which differs greatly from the Okinawan Nepai?

Anyone care to discuss this form in its various forms?

15th November 2002, 11:52
I think you will find many, if not all, the Okinawan "versions" of kata differ from the Chinese versions.

Paihequan
15th November 2002, 23:49
Thanks Robert,

Yes I agree although some of the Okinawan versions are far closer to the original Chinese than say the Japanese variants like Nipaipo for example.

I guess it all really comes down to a matter of personal preference but I rather like the flow of the Chinese

16th November 2002, 03:45
Originally posted by Paihequan


I guess it all really comes down to a matter of personal preference but I rather like the flow of the Chinese


Why don't you just adjust the flow of the Okinawan "version" to make it flow like the Chinese version.

kusanku
16th November 2002, 13:30
Doing Kata with an advanced timing, indeed in any way other than that taught basic students, is apparently not a well-known concept these days.:D

Though it is in Chinese arts such as Taijiquan.

Paihequan
19th November 2002, 01:15
Robert: nice to be talking in a civil manner. I guess I could adjust the flow of the Okinawan version but it is missing what I could best describe as several "connecting" Techniques. In all seriousness I feel personally that the Chinese Ershibada is a more practical form embodying the essence of Crane-Fist and the balance of Yin & Yang.

The Chinese Paihequan I've been lucky to have been exposed to is very similar in concept to Taiji.

19th November 2002, 02:51
Originally posted by Paihequan
Robert: nice to be talking in a civil manner.

:rolleyes: If you don't talk sxxxt I won't give you any.



Originally posted by Paihequan
I guess I could adjust the flow of the Okinawan version but it is missing what I could best describe as several "connecting" Techniques.

What do you mean by "connecting techniques"?


Originally posted by Paihequan
In all seriousness I feel personally that the Chinese Ershibada is a more practical form embodying the essence of Crane-Fist and the balance of Yin & Yang.

Really? How so?

Paihequan
19th November 2002, 23:44
By "connecting techniques" I mean those who allow the flow of the form to take place. To me, at least, the Chinese Ershibada has more connective techniques which seem to make more sense than that of the Okinawan counterpart that I have been exposed to. To be honest the Okinawan Nepai has a very strong "karate" feel to it.

Why do I like the Chinese Ershibada? Hard to answer. Probably more a matter of personal taste than anything else. Less rigidity in its structure, more balance of yin and yang. It simply seems to fit me better

19th November 2002, 23:59
Originally posted by Paihequan
By "connecting techniques" I mean those who allow the flow of the form to take place.

That was pretty obvious from the start......my question was looking for a more specific answer.



Originally posted by Paihequan
To me, at least, the Chinese Ershibada has more connective techniques which seem to make more sense than that of the Okinawan counterpart that I have been exposed to. To be honest the Okinawan Nepai has a very strong "karate" feel to it.

Make more sense in what way?




Originally posted by Paihequan
.........Less rigidity in its structure, more balance of yin and yang. It simply seems to fit me better

You can chose to do any form with or with out rigidity.

Paihequan
20th November 2002, 00:09
Robert,

I'll try to answer as best I can. Connecting techniques: For example the Chinese Ershibada has the addition of the Elbow Smash, Flag & Drum Fist to a "Double Sun-Fist Punches" and then Bend the Bow , Back-Fist combination where the Okinawan Nepai that I know (which may differ from what you know) has the Elbow Smash, Flag & Drum Fist, no Double Punches, Bend the Bow and Back-Fist combination ... as a basic example of just one area of the form.

The form simply feels right for my physicality and the essence of the art as I practice it. There exists more of a natural progression from the previous forms we use: Pah Puh Lien, Ba Bu Lien Er Lu, Ba Bu Lien Sam Lu .......all being from the same lineage/art

Paihequan
20th November 2002, 23:37
I thought I'd expand just a little more on my views regarding Ershibada and the Okinawan Nepai:

One of the reasons I prefer Ershibada over Nepai is because of its flow and use of the yin and yang principle in a more connective way than that seen in the obviously karate-influenced Nepai.

Ershibada contains a number of additional connecting techniques in its sequential actions than that of Nepai. These techniques hold the essebnce of tension and non-tension, twisting and untwisting, opening and closing, raising and lowering all in accordance to the yin and yang principle.

Ershibada combines somewhat more intensive upper body and lower body movemnts with light but rooted stepping to empoer energy deeper into the techniques.

The rhythm, speed and coordination of the form (Taolu) is structured in accordance with the principle of continuous change.

I feel that the body's balance and coordination is trained and brought forward in a more significant way. The summation of natural body motion seems to me at least to be more natural and flowing.