PDA

View Full Version : What i came to this topic for...



stevemcgee99
12th December 2002, 04:50
How does one appoach their sensei with requests to alter the class, or to focus on things that aren't a regular priority? Does one?

Also, how does one approach a potential sensei (who might not actually be teaching anyone) to teach them their art?

And, what is a good way to withdraw, or prractice less-frequently from a class in order to pursue another?

It seems like any of this would be taboo, or taken as rude.

Oni
12th December 2002, 05:07
I would say personally in both cases clear and open communication. After or before a class (or if you teacher will make special appointments) bring up either/or subject. For the first perhaps just express an interest in a particular subject and ask if it might ever be covered. Perhaps it will be...just later in your training or in the structure of the group. There may be a specific reason the instructor does NOT want to go there yet...either way it will be good for you to know. Of course some martial arts are a little more formal or strict. I personally always want my students to ask questions when things come up. I may not always give them the answer they are looking for...or even really 'answer' 100%...but I will never be offended or bothered.

As to the second...again...this is not the 'old days'. You want to train somewhere less to try something else out..it is YOUR decision. If the teacher has a problem with it, perhaps that group isn't the best for you anyway. At least by open communication if the instructor DOES have a problem...you will know, as well as perhaps learning why he/she may have the problem. Perhaps they feel the specific type of 'other' training you want to do will hinder what you are doing in their group.

Personally I feel instructors that would be offended by these sorts of questions are suffering from a bit of ego..but just my opinion and way of doing things ;)

Rogier
12th December 2002, 06:25
it's the same as asking a question to a girl.... nothing will happen if you don't ask anyway the worst thing your teacher can say is NO


Personally I feel instructors that would be offended by these sorts of questions are suffering from a bit of ego..but just my opinion and way of doing things

I totally agree with Oni on that one...

Amir
12th December 2002, 15:13
Depends on your relationship with the Sensei I would think

As a veteran trainee, my sensei often asks me what would I like us to do in training :o
After all, he is human too, and would like to consult with the students. Any student approaching him with such subjects would be welcome.


As for reducing attendance due to other M.A. studies, this is a sensitive issue since it indicates you have less trust in your teacher then he would like. And consider other teachers as better then him. Both concepts would heart any relationship, if you can make it clear this is not the subject, I doubt he would mind (We had students reduce attendance frequency to go and study other M.A. for a period of times - years in fact, with no apparent problem with the teacher).

Amir

Menace
13th December 2002, 14:37
How does one appoach their sensei with requests to alter the class, or to focus on things that aren't a regular priority? Does one?

By all means, yes. Always question the leader. If you don't he'll assume. Then that makes an Ass of U and Me. If your not sure which direction your sensei is taking you ask, ask , ask. If he thinks it's non of your business then what kind of concern does he/she have for your well being and success? I get asked all the time, I have a very open relationship with my students. That's the only way to build true trust and loyalty. Approach him respectively of course, and in private. Just in case he/she blows a gasket.

Also, how does one approach a potential sensei (who might not actually be teaching anyone) to teach them their art?
Ask.

And, what is a good way to withdraw, or prractice less-frequently from a class in order to pursue another?

Always talk to your current sensei and let them know what's going on, I've had students do that to me and some have told me upfront others have not. I always respect the ones who are honest more, I know that it took a lot of courage to tell me.

It seems like any of this would be taboo, or taken as rude.

We're not in Japan! Your not going to offend or make anyone lose face...do what you feel is right for you.

Robert Cheshire
16th December 2002, 05:41
As others have mentioned - ASK!

Generally speaking when our students ask to work on techniques it's something they feel they need work on or going to test on sometime in the future. I would start there. Choose something that you need work on. Don't pick something just because it is cool looking or more fun than what you have been working on.

After you gain rapport with your instructor you can ask a little more. I'd use an approach simillar to "I really enjoyed when we did... Can we do that again sometime soon..."

As mentioned in other replies, we are not in Japan and you did not pledge your life to your school/sensei. If there is something else you want to do - do it. I would suggest you have a good/solid base in your current art before venturing out into other areas. You will find that other styles will make you a well rounded martial artist. In Yoseikan, Minoru Mochizuki always encouraged new black belts to go out and get a black belt in judo or karate, etc. afterwards.

stevemcgee99
16th December 2002, 06:48
It's not that I want to practice another art, but I want to study with a more reputable, "licensed" teacher. And a complete ryu. But still iaido.

Also, I only want to cover less material in class, not learn more exciting stuff. I seems like that is what we've been doing. It's been over a year and we've only practiced the first kata less than 10 times. I'd like to know if my grip is improved, or what I need to change in my draw, whether or not my chiburi is correct. We just haven't been covering that at all.
But...sensei said that he wanted us "all to learn the 10 kata". He sounded frustrated, I know he's disappointed in the attendence and commitment of some students. It seems that things have gotten unorganized since sempai moved away. We'll see what happens.
And, class is only on thursdays now, so I'll check out some more stuff. Thanks for the responses.

Phil Farmer
16th December 2002, 21:30
I would reiterate what others have said about asking except when I read your last post it seems you have a different problem. I don't usually have my students ask what you are asking, please teach me more basics. It sounds like you want to work on your foundational skills and, if I read correctly you are learning iaido, that is the heart and soul of the sword arts. You should be spending hours and hours on holding the katana, chiburi, proper posture and the "nitpicky" sorts of things that make iaido what it is. If I were learning only iaido I would expect to spend the first year on, maybe two or three basic kata, but I would expect my feel for the sword to have become highly developed and my basic ability to draw the sword from a variety of directions to be sound. You may be able to go to the Sensei and ask him for help with the basics but you might be better off looking for a new Sensei. You might try the Bugei.com website, they have some excellent contacts in the sword arts in California.

Phil Farmer