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edg176
18th February 2003, 23:02
I saw this the other day at the store:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/4770027591/qid=1045612769/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_1/002-2053905-6635267?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

The Secrets of Okinawan Karate: Essence and Techniques.

I was wondering about his explanation of the shotokan punch vs his penetrating punch. He talks a little bit about the one-inch punch etc.

Anyone seen this gentleman or his students in actions?
It sure looks different than the karate that I've seen (Shotokan and Wado-ryu).

Comments?
Tim Fong

Machimura
19th February 2003, 07:06
His reasoning for throwing a whipping punch vs. a "muscle power only" punch is sound. Most good Shorin schools teach punching with the same rationale. It says in his bio that he also trained and fought Muay Thai in Thailand. Not bad. Doesn't Shotokan (being of ShuriTe derivation) teach one how to punch like this? If not then that may be the Naha Te influence- force vs. speed (which seem to be inclusive). Physics supports Sensei Arakaki's assertions.

Bryan Cyr

Bustillo, A.
19th February 2003, 09:36
K. Arakaki's brand of karate, 'Muso kai'.

Muso kai combines shorin ryu with kyokushin and he enters his fighters in full-contact KK type events.

Machimura
19th February 2003, 23:31
Thanks Sensei Bustillo. Those are 2 very good styles to combine. His students are probably bad-arse!!!

Pavel Dolgachov
6th March 2003, 15:32
I saw an translated article (reference to article) about tsuki practise in Shorin-ryu and some exercoises. As it was written, he is 8 dan of Matsubayashi-ryu karatedo.

hmjoe
11th March 2003, 00:00
Hello All,

In his book, he makes several interesting observations on directing a person center of gravity to the outside of the body to harness the power of the gravity into a tecnique.

I tried this in some kata, and of course, it feels awkward for me (since this is new to me) and kind of feels like you are falling into a tecnique. Again, since you are falling, you have that power added to your tecnique, but, I just feel really off balance.

I may be interpreting it all wrong, I thought the book was a little hard to follow, so I will read it again and analize it some more.

He does talk about learning to float, and that Naihanchi is kind of using the tecnique when you lift the leg ( so you are on one leg )

Like a chair missing 2 legs.... Interesting....

I guess I need to work it quite a bit more, but I think he has something.


:D

Ginko
11th March 2003, 12:49
Joe,

Arakai is 100% correct. Read this article by Toshihiro Oshiro
and you will see that they are in complete agreement:

http://www.oshirodojo.com/karate.html

hmjoe
12th March 2003, 02:37
Thanks Ginko, Sir,

I have three of Toshihiro Oshiro's videos, and they are quite treasured in my collection.

I happened to have Jury Duty Today, and was able to read about 100 pages of his book again.

Some of the things seem to contradict what my Sensei says, So, I will probably lend the book to my sensei and see what he thinks. The ICG stuff is facinating.


-Joe

kusanku
17th March 2003, 01:37
Oh-Oh.

Sounds like Real Secrets of Okinawan Karate and Real Things you learn from Kata are getting out.

Is what it sounds like.

hmjoe
17th March 2003, 14:19
kusanku,

Tell us, what is your opinion? I have read your posts before and highly respect your opinion.

My main issue is the feeling off ballance stuff. Looking at the book, it does make logical sense to project your ICG to a place outside of your body...

But, It also seems like if you are leaning foward, for example, doesn't it put you at a disadvantge to be commiting to a specific direction and loss of ballance?

He says that you find ballance when you contact your opponent... But, what if you miss.... Does that mean that you are now falling.... Don't akido people use this to their advantage, too? Take advangage of someone's foward attack energy?

Perhaps I am moving too foward when doing these techniques.... Perhaps it is a more suttle thing.

Please share your insites....

Machimura
18th March 2003, 00:28
Balance is the key. My sensei always says, "first off steal their balance", this is why stances that are to long and deep can't distribute force as well as natural ones. Additionally, movement is hampered. In the same breath, proper power transfer is facilitated by correct structural ki. This means that your tanden or dantien should always be where it's suppose to be. Just below your navel. If your center of gravity is above or below that then your alignment is not good. Correct movement and transfer of momentum will be effected. Positioning and quickness rely on balance. Notice I said "quickness", not "speed". Oh yeah, relaxation when it counts is also crucial.

It's not about leaning forward or backward. It's about sinking and rising power, depending on the elevation of ones strike and ma-ai. Bend your knees! These are the SECRETS that have been "misplaced" with karates "budofication". The truth is, what very, very few people still understand about toudi may hurt you, hahaha! That other junk will anger a real fighter, ruin YOUR balance and make things rough (for you) in a real fight. Of course none of us know what a real fight is. The only reality is UFC, Pride and Full Contact karate.

Your turn John....

Bryan Cyr, Nidan, Kokusai ShuriTe Karate/Kobujutsu Rengo Kai

Machimura
18th March 2003, 00:47
Originally posted by Ginko
Joe,

Arakai is 100% correct. Read this article by Toshihiro Oshiro
and you will see that they are in complete agreement:

http://www.oshirodojo.com/karate.html

To say that he is 100% correct would be a false statement. Most of his points are right on, but some fall short. For example, Shuri Te was influenced by the Satsuma Family style, Jigen Ryu, but much of its influence is from Shaolin where Sokon Matsumura trained, and the native fighting traditions of Okinawa. Many of the linear aspects of Shorin do come from kenjutsu type ideals, but Shorin is both linear and circular. At least Orthodox Shuri Te.

All-in-all an outstanding article and I agree with about 98% of what he said. The leaning forward, or projecting one's momentum forward is kinda' questionable, as you can do this without "leaning" or "falling" forward. Old technique may appear to lean, but it is more gravity utilization than anything. Balance is still 50/50 at the terminus. Don't give the opponent any momentum he could use to his favor.

Bryan Cyr

hmjoe
22nd March 2003, 00:04
Hello Guys,

Well, I showed the book to my Sensei... He disagrees with much of what is in the book. Expecially much of the foward posture that the book depicts.

He infact told me that I should do less Karate-Read and more Karate-Do....

My Sensei is highly respected, and has never steered me wrong. So, I guess that the book does not apply to my style of karate, which is probably why I am having such a hard time with the material.

Thanks, anyway for your input....


Sincerely,

Joe DiBella

Nyuck3X
22nd March 2003, 01:07
Bryan,
I'll try to explain this as best as I can without insulting
Oshiro Sensei because I have yet to be able to do this on a
regular basis.

The way he explained the "falling" to me was, if you look at an
Olympic runner, his feet don't propel him as much as they try to
keep up with his head. In other words you are slightly out of
balance and you kind of fall into your position. Since Okinawan
stances are much narrower than Japanese, your commitment to
direction isn't as severe. Also, when you commit to a direction,
you commit. So in moving forward, you are using sinking power.
I think...:rolleyes:

I hope I didn't butcher the explanation. Like I said, I haven't
mastered this yet, and I haven't seen Oshiro Sensei in 2 years,
but there is a difference. He also told me that this was one of
the diffences between sport and (for lack of a better word) jutsu.

Peace

Machimura
22nd March 2003, 08:54
Originally posted by Nyuck3X
Bryan,
I'll try to explain this as best as I can without insulting
Oshiro Sensei because I have yet to be able to do this on a
regular basis.

The way he explained the "falling" to me was, if you look at an
Olympic runner, his feet don't propel him as much as they try to
keep up with his head. In other words you are slightly out of
balance and you kind of fall into your position. Since Okinawan
stances are much narrower than Japanese, your commitment to
direction isn't as severe. Also, when you commit to a direction,
you commit. So in moving forward, you are using sinking power.
I think...:rolleyes:

I hope I didn't butcher the explanation. Like I said, I haven't
mastered this yet, and I haven't seen Oshiro Sensei in 2 years,
but there is a difference. He also told me that this was one of
the diffences between sport and (for lack of a better word) jutsu.

Peace

Thanks for the explanation. He is right then, sorry!
Bryan Cyr

Gene Williams
22nd March 2003, 10:42
I agree with Joe's Sensei, too much talk and not enough do. I went to Arakaki's website and was really not that impressed with the pictures or the information. The concept of "falling" into a technique and the "whippin punch" are concepts that are found in many Okinawan ryu. If you do the kata long enough and properly, they just happen. I personally think Mr. Arakaki is a nice guy but a lightweight.;) Gene

kusanku
24th March 2003, 03:43
Hi Joe, Bryan, Guys-

Pretty much what's been said.That is, Oshiro Sensei is right, I read his articles and it squares with how I was taught that style.

When you step and move, you do it as a unit, and you hit just as you land.Or maybe, just a tad before you land, but you aren't really of-balance.

Naihanchi Shodan Kata is key to understanding this concept, the nami gaeshi or wave returns leg technique shows how to control a fall without falling.

People often teach, first step, then punch.Okay for kids I guess,but that ain't karate jutsu.In karate jutsu, its more like, first punch then start the step.Body comes in behind the arm or leg and there's a wave of shocking power.Plus it really messes up the opponent's defense and timing.

But really, its hard to describe.Lot of practice of the basic stepping patterns, kata, kumites and punches and kicks, strikes and blocks, are required, then mastering the kata necessary to learn these skills.Some get it better and faster than others.It seems like you are disregarding laws of physics but in fact, you are merely correctly applying them.

Can you fall down if you miss or otherwise messs up? You betcha!:DThat's why Naihanchi and other kata need to be done several times daily for several years, to hardwire the safety reflexes that you won't otherwise have.Learning to come down out of that nami gaeshi softly as well as swiftly every time, is key to retaining your balance in this kind of natural movement in self defense.

That's really about what there is to say about this, the rest is practice, like Joe's Sensei said.But sometimes reading can help, too.One idea internalized is wotrth a thousand hours incomplete practice, but when once the idea is there the practice, is needed to make it real.

Take Care,

Rich
7th April 2003, 16:30
Hi all

What I find amazing, and commonsensical at the same time, is that we now start to see more overlap in the arts. This method of power generation is the same as is used in Ninpo taijutsu. My opinion is that all arts are fundamentally the same in priciple and here is an example of how that resurfaces today.

The 'falling' into a technique can get very subtle as both Karate and Taijutsu Shihan will show but it can be good to exagerate in the early stages to get the gist.

Regards

Rich

Rich
7th April 2003, 16:33
BTW whats Arakaki's website called, please?

Rich

Ginko
12th April 2003, 18:49
You can find the website here:

http://www.geocities.com/musokai/welcome.html

15th April 2003, 18:03
Hello all,

Both Oshiro and Arakaki are attempting to explain some advanced principles that are not easy to grasp from reading a book. This using of gravity to propel and add momentum in the body is not an easy thing to do. It requires one to be very very relaxed and know and understand where one's point of gravity is at, at all times. Another component of this techinque is the "principle" of being "off balance" during your movement. In sport karate you step and lock and pose in a stance and adjust your stances so they are picture perfect so that judges can see them.

Oshiro's sensei teaches that one should not be in "balance"- before, during, and after, therefore implying that one is in constant movement. Which is how it is in real life, one is not stuck in any given position for any amount of time. Oshiro sensei states that if you do kata this way in a tournament (using tehse combat principles) you would loose and be critisized that your kata is wobbly, that you do not have proper balance, and you look like someone that has little control. So we are talking about apples and oranges.

Oshiro sensei's Yamanni-ryu performance is a perfect example if anyone is priviledged to see him and/or train with him. In Yamanni-ryu you cannot be in a frozen state, nor use muscle to wield the bo.
Coming from another Kobudo style I had to completely throw away everything I was doing and relearn the Bo, Sai and Tunfa. It is like night and day, in a different galaxy. I would recommend to anyone to attend one of his seminars and check it out.

Oshiro Sensei is an expert at punching from 0 (zero) distance, 1", 2" etc... this is also what Arakaki is stating in his book, it is using maximum output with very little external windup, using your internals, along with natures gravity. It is allowing techniques to happen as opposed to forcing them to happen.

My 2 cents worth.
Peace.

Nyuck3X
15th April 2003, 21:31
Hi Angel,


Oshiro sensei states that if you do kata this way in a tournament (using these combat principles) you would loose and be critisized that your kata is wobbly, that you do not have proper balance, and you look like someone that has little control.

I remember him telling me this too but forgot over the ravishes
of time. Thanks for the clarification. My Kobayashi teacher
is a pilot and explained it to me like this. Flying is all about
compensation. The air lifts and drops you at it's demand. You have to
constantly correct. If you stop, you drop.

Thanks again.
Peace

16th April 2003, 07:25
Ray said:
-----------
The air lifts and drops you at it's demand. You have to constantly correct. If you stop, you drop.
-----------
That is a good one Ray! Your Sensei is a wise man for sure.

Bustillo, A.
16th April 2003, 17:30
Angel Lemus, hello.

I think I remeber you. You were one of the founding fathers of a Perer Urban off-shoot goju style; Sansei goju.

Back to the thread.
You lost me when you mention the off-balancing; only because I witnessed a tape of your fourth dan test and the off-balancing and falling proved ineffective.

17th April 2003, 06:53
Bustillo A. said (about me):
-------------------------------
You lost me when you mention the off-balancing; only because I witnessed a tape of your fourth dan test and the off-balancing and falling proved ineffective.,
--------------------------------

Where you ever in the Sansei group? What style are you doing now? And what taping of my 4th Dan are you talking about? Which style do you mean? If you are talking about my 4th dan under Sansei Goju under manny Saavedra then you must be cofusing me with someone else cause I never tested for it. For that matter I have never been taped for 4rth dan in any style? Manny Saavedra awarded it to me without a test. Maybe it was another event? Hm?

And if you are implying that I must been an ineffectively over-ranked off-balanced 25 year old wearing a Renshi belt you are probably right in your observation at that time because I was young stupid, full of snot, and no where near any level of real undersdtanding of bujutsu (it did not exists in those days).

Today I am 42 years old and I am not the person and martial artists I was then. I look at that young man you are reffering to, and I say to myself who was that idiot? I think I have a better handle on things today.

In those days there was much good intentions but much ignorance about martial arts, and karate in general. Much of my generation in Miami had no clue of what martial arts was really about.

The off balancing I am talking about here is a deliberate tehcnique, and a very advnaced Koryu bujutsu principle, the off balancing you describe in the tape you saw is probably because .... that person was was off-balance.

I did not have this knowledge posted in this thread then, nor did any teachers I was involved with in that group. They were just as young and misguided, as I was equally being misguided. So I ask you not judge my attempts to impart my experiences in this forum here by what you may have seen 18 years ago of an amateur (me).

It's all good, and I must say that in my first 15 years of martial arts training it was not under very good guidance (except for the Judo I was doing that was real, you cannot fake Judo) but I was young, determined, and that is why I went elsewhere looking for something more traditional that had more depth and substance. This idealism has always guided me to keep looking and looking, and I have gone past teacher after teacher when I realize they cannot teach me any more.

This is the way it has to be, otherwise you become a clone of mediocrity. Any martial artist has to admit his weaknesses, downfalls, errors to himself first, then you learn and you grow and you become better. It is the way of nature and budo. I am a traditionalist, but I am not blinded nor glued by styles (even my own) I am guilty of cross-training but it is a strength, but I have the ability to get all this knowledge and pump it back to a traditional style and use that to fill the gaps inherent in the generational lapses of knowledge we all suffer from today.

That being said, all that stuff I said about Oshiro sensie's theories on off balancing are still the gospel as far as I am concerned and I stand behind my statements ( even though I was off balance 18 years ago, in more than one way). At least I knew Judo and if I fell I incorporated into the form by doing a rollout and pretended I meant to do it all along! Hey that is how we made katas up- adlib, the secret is out!

PS- if you really think it is me in that tape I would love to get a copy of it so I can laught, do you have a copy? I 'll even pay you for it seriously.

Bustillo, A.
17th April 2003, 11:32
Originally posted by nincho
Bustillo A. said (about me):

Where you ever in the Sansei group? And what taping of my 4th Dan are you talking about? ...
And if you are implying that I must been an ineffectively over-ranked off-balanced 25 year old wearing a Renshi belt you are probably right ..In those days there was much good intentions but much ignorance about martial arts, and karate in general. Much of my generation in Miami had no clue of what martial arts was really about. ..
... ... I went elsewhere looking for something more traditional that had more depth and substance.
It is the way of nature and budo.
PS- if you really think it is me in that tape I would love to get a copy of it so I can laught, do you have a copy? I 'll even pay you for it seriously.


Mr. Lemus,

No, I was never in Sansei goju, why would I want to belong to ...that? I was not implying anything about you nor anything about over-rank. I know you are serious about karate. Most of the folks on this forum already know that certain organization are notorious for issuing elevated ranks, fancy titles and pretty belts to young gullible members stupid enough to think they merit such nonsense.

And please don't group all us South Florida folks into your assumption when you comment about 'the ignorance of your generation in Miami.' There were plenty of legit qualified instructors during that era. My instructors were top-notch and they did know their martial arts.

You ask if I'm certain if it was you on the tape. I'm almost sure I have the right person because I remember you in the tournament circuit. Kata, never fighting, correct?
However, I didn't mean to dwell on that. It was just that when I read your comments about off-balancing, I remebered the test I watched on tape, Seibukan in Colorado 1994 perhaps, and though it had not worked in your favor.


BTW. The magazine you worked on did have some good articles.

Ginko
17th April 2003, 13:15
Antonio,

I was there I believe it was his Sandan test. I can't recall if it was '92 or '94. For what it's worth, it was also prior to his involvement with Oshiro & the movement principles.
I may also be on that tape, as I tested for my Shodan that day. Unlike Angel though, I'd just as soon forget it. A lot of water has passed under the bridge since then!

Also, I agree that Bugeisha was excellent. Btw, are you planning on writing another book? I really enjoyed Steady Training.

17th April 2003, 15:06
Antonio,

I did not mean to lump everyone else into the "ignorant" group, I was reffering to the group I was with. And now that you clarify which tape you saw, Yes that was me, and I did suck big time that day, which is one reason I did not pass. Ginko (Jay) did much better than me that day.

That seems like an eternity and theprinciples of Seibukan of that era were not very sophisticated (under he leadership of that time) that is one reason that whole organization broke apart, some went under Sensei Dan Smith (ISKA), others started the Zentokukai.

I looked at your website, your stuff looks very good, and your training looks to be very solid. Are you teaching nowadays?

Goju Man
18th April 2003, 01:41
I did not mean to lump everyone else into the "ignorant" group, I was reffering to the group I was with.
Uh Oh, I happen to have been part of sansei goju. Allthough I can say that I wasn't one of those guys who got "handed" anything. Many have walked away from that organization with plenty of rank. I've always been interested in the rank of performance, not necessarily whats around your waist. That is the thing I love about bjj and mma, the instructors do get it on and have to put it on the mat everyday. In karate, many rank miesters just stand around and bark out "ich, ni, san" and don't ever have to do anything else. Besides, I seem to recall sansei goju had some pretty good fighters in it.

18th April 2003, 01:54
I agree with you 100%, BJJ and similar styles are no BS, yo do not see beerbellies on these guys and rank matters little.

Sansei Goju had some good fighters, and there was a lot of good that they did. But when you get down to it, it was entry level karate knowledge. I have fond memories of those days and had a lot of fun. But in the end I switched due the inherent problems and weaknesess the style had.

Goju Man
19th April 2003, 03:03
You should always search for the truth.;)

Gene Williams
19th April 2003, 11:19
I heard a student say once that he wouldn't feel like he was any good until he got his black belt (he was very good, by the way). Another, even more junior student responded, "Hey, it ain't the belt that knocks the guy down." Very true. Gene

Machimura
20th April 2003, 08:58
I skimmed over Kyoshi Arakaki's book at "Border's". It was a refreshing karate book to say the least. I agreed with a lot of what he said. I just might buy it! Oh yeah-- SHURI-TE RULES!!! Hahahahahaha!!!:D

B.Cyr

Goju Man
23rd April 2003, 01:29
I heard a student say once that he wouldn't feel like he was any good until he got his black belt (he was very good, by the way). Another, even more junior student responded, "Hey, it ain't the belt that knocks the guy down." Very true. Gene

Gene, the belt system has become a staus symbol in the martial arts, but mostly karate. Most guys don't have to put up, so they walk around with that multi colored belt or dan stripes to his ankles having everyone around him going osu, osu. The real legit guys don't put that much stock in rank. I don't have a problem with wearing a white belt or whatever, my obi is on the floor or the mat. "Damn, pretty damn good white belt".:D

hmjoe
23rd April 2003, 02:50
Originally posted by Goju Man


Gene, the belt system has become a staus symbol in the martial arts, but mostly karate. Most guys don't have to put up, so they walk around with that multi colored belt or dan stripes to his ankles having everyone around him going osu, osu. The real legit guys don't put that much stock in rank. I don't have a problem with wearing a white belt or whatever, my obi is on the floor or the mat. "Damn, pretty damn good white belt".:D

Hi Goju Man -

I have an interesting story for you.

I am one of Sensei Higa's students on Okinawa Kenpo Style. I started with him about a year ago. I am one of his white belts. He starts everyone as a white belt. Even though I have been training on and off for 15 years and have brown belts in various TKD styles, I am more proud of my white belt with him (and I have learned more as one of his white belts than all else combined!)

Anyway, I am riding the train home from NYC last week and two guys are sitting in the seat in front of me. One guy says, "Hey Sensei, you worked us hard tonight". So, being the friendly New Yorker I am and noticing that they are from out of town, I say, "Hey you guys are into martial arts... Do you want to borrow my martial arts magazine for the trip." And, I introduce myself.

I get to talking to these nice people and one guy asks me "So how long are you training" , I say on and off for 15 years... He says, "So you must be well up into the dan ranks..." I said, No.... I am a white belt... And they looked amazed.... Never before have I been so proud of saying that.... I also added later that I am a brown belt in TKD.

My opinion. My rank means nothing. Just think how other school's students who spar with me feel when a white belt beats them!

Sensei Sokon only had White Belts and Black Belts, so someone may have been a white belt for years under him.

Turns out that one of the guys was Sensei Nagamine. Son of Sensei Shoshin Nagamine. Amazing who you can run into on the LIRR.

I got Sensei Nagamine's phone number. I have to contact him about fixing his computer. I just might ask him about the book, just to get his opinion on the topic of ICG and project it outward. Will keep you all informed about what he tells me.

humility
3rd January 2007, 19:46
K. Arakaki's brand of karate, 'Muso kai'.

Muso kai combines shorin ryu with kyokushin and he enters his fighters in full-contact KK type events.


You all know a bit....about the teachings of my Shihan you know nothing....but you have interest to understand a little about the way.

You need not agree with what you understand....but what you don't understand you mustnít disagree with. This would prove to be juvenile in your personal judgment.

These are proven tactics by a mighty practitioner of the old way combined with a modern realization.

Please enjoy reading the essence of the bodies inner mechanics.....whip versus two by four.......interesting......and correct, correct, correct....Muso kai Karate Do.

humility
3rd January 2007, 19:49
Gene, the belt system has become a staus symbol in the martial arts, but mostly karate. Most guys don't have to put up, so they walk around with that multi colored belt or dan stripes to his ankles having everyone around him going osu, osu. The real legit guys don't put that much stock in rank. I don't have a problem with wearing a white belt or whatever, my obi is on the floor or the mat. "Damn, pretty damn good white belt".:D

Interesting.....i agree that the color of your belt doesn't matter...if your master is only interested in giving them away.

Think of belts as degrees of knowledge....and the bars as depth with in the degrees.

TheBadger
10th January 2007, 19:37
Bryan,

The way he explained the "falling" to me was, if you look at an
Olympic runner, his feet don't propel him as much as they try to
keep up with his head. In other words you are slightly out of
balance and you kind of fall into your position. Since Okinawan
stances are much narrower than Japanese, your commitment to
direction isn't as severe. Also, when you commit to a direction,
you commit. So in moving forward, you are using sinking power.
I think...:rolleyes:



My problem with this anaolgy is a runner does not have someone trying to punch him in the face when he leans forward. I for one do not like the idea of leading with my head and shoulders.

That being said, I just bought the book (great deal on a used copy on Amazon) and have started reading it. I can always empty my tea cup a bit to learn something new.

Nyuck3X
10th January 2007, 21:09
In application, you would move your koshi not your head! :p

Mizu_no_kokoro
7th February 2007, 08:02
Was this tread initially on "power generation" (phajing) in karate or I totally missed the point ?!?

Mashu
6th March 2014, 01:03
I agree with Joe's Sensei, too much talk and not enough do. I went to Arakaki's website and was really not that impressed with the pictures or the information. The concept of "falling" into a technique and the "whippin punch" are concepts that are found in many Okinawan ryu. If you do the kata long enough and properly, they just happen. I personally think Mr. Arakaki is a nice guy but a lightweight.;) GeneThis is an old thread, but this needs to be addressed. Shihan Arakaki does not need me to defend him on some internet forum, but the sheer ignorance of calling him a lightweight is painful to read. I have trained in many martial arts, and Shihan Arakaki is the finest martial artist I have ever met, in fact after meeting him I can't say that I've ever met another true martial artist besides him. If you consider the sport based arts of Judo and Gracie Jiu Jitsu then I have, but in the striking arts no one even comes close. The only thing that I believe surpasses his skill is his teaching, and every single student who attended his school and had experience in other arts said the same thing. Best school they had ever seen, even in Japan (A lot of exchange students from Japan trained at his school while I was there).So I am sorry you are so quick to judge a man you have never met, nor trained under Mr. Williams. You have done yourself a tremendous disservice in doing so.

Mashu
6th March 2014, 01:08
Was this tread initially on "power generation" (phajing) in karate or I totally missed the point ?!?

No matter how accomplished and skilled the author of a book is, you will never learn power generation from reading something. For anyone who reads this thread, if Karate-Ka power punches are what you seek, go to Salt Lake and train with Shihan Arakaki-there is no one better skill wise and no one better at transmitting that skill to a student.