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O'Neill
14th January 2003, 19:10
I was wondering if fumio nawa sensei is in good health? Does he teach jujutsu in additional to masaki ryu?

Don Cunningham
14th January 2003, 19:19
I think you mean Yumio Nawa sensei. He was in good health when I met with him this past March to discuss my research in jutte and Edo period arresting arts. He was quite active for someone in their 90s. I observed and participated briefly in one of his Masaki Ryu classes on jutte and manriki kusari. Although Nawa sensei wore a keikogi, he sat on the sidelines and mostly just commented on the practice session. He was not actually doing any instruction.

Outside his residence, I noticed he walks with the aid of a cane. In fact, he presented me with a new cane just like his, sort of a lacquered bamboo weave over an oak core, suggesting it would be useful in case I needed to block a katana strike. He also predicted that I would probably need one in about 15 years or so. (I am nearly 50 years old.) Apparently the cane was made by one a Japanese craftsman and one of his peers. We also discussed how sad it is to see such traditional arts fading out as the last practitioners get too old.

He has also responded to several letters with out mentioning any special problems or recent illnesses. Therefore, I would assume that he is still in pretty good health.

O'Neill
14th January 2003, 21:25
Yes, that is who I meant. I had just read a piece by Fumio Demura and mixed up the names. Does Yumio Nawa practice Jujutsu as well, I would think so.

Don Cunningham
15th January 2003, 13:29
Nawa sensei didn't mention any other classes or styles other than his Masaki ryu. They specialize in manriki-kusari and jutte (combined with hana-neji, tessen, etc.). I don't think he practices or teaches any other form of jujutsu. He describes himself as the "the last soke of Masaki Ryu manrikigusarijutsu and Edo machikata juttejutsu" ("founder or creator of Masaki ryu 10,000 power chain art and Edo city style jutte art") in his book, Jutte Torinawa Jiten.

The really cool thing is that Nawa sensei doesn't make any false claims about inheriting any koryu martial art style. He is very upfront about how he created Masaki ryu from his own investigation and study of history and by recreating many of the techniques from researching old documents. He has become quite a celebrity for his technical advice in many jidai geki movies and television series. Many of our Western self-proclaimed "soke" could learn a lot from his example.

Hissho
16th January 2003, 17:13
Originally posted by Don Cunningham
The really cool thing is that Nawa sensei doesn't make any false claims about inheriting any koryu martial art style. He is very upfront about how he created Masaki ryu from his own investigation and study of history and by recreating many of the techniques from researching old documents. He has become quite a celebrity for his technical advice in many jidai geki movies and television series. Many of our Western self-proclaimed "soke" could learn a lot from his example.

Don -

Do you mean that he created the style based on older Masaki-ryu densho or that he created a new Masaki-ryu based on study of the densho of other older ryu?

Dan, any thoughts?

Kit LeBlanc

Don Cunningham
17th January 2003, 16:11
Obviously, it is always possible that I have misinterpreted some of the things told to me by Nawa sensei and his senior students. In our personal conversations, he told me specifically that much of his knowledge about jutte came from researching old documents, etc. I wasn't too concerned about the manriki-kusari, so I may have easily have misinterpreted his background in that.

Nawa sensei and I did have some very specific conversations about jutte and their use during the Edo period. He admitted that some of his interpretations are based on educated speculation and personal observation. Certainly nothing wrong with that. It is what historians do all the time. It just confirmed what I had learned elsewhere, i.e., there is not a lot of specific information documented about jutte and jutte-jutsu. And yes, Nawa sensei seems to have quite an affinity for very obscure kanji characters, making it extremely difficult for an amateur like me.

I also have a letter in which Nawa sensei discussed his early training with his grandfather, but I was unaware that this was specifically Masaki ryu. Frankly, I was not that interested in manriki-kusari, so we didn't discuss this too much.

And yes, I am still trying to learn the chain return on my own. It is very, very difficult. If I didn't get it right every now and then, though, I would have given up. There must be some secret, but I just haven't found it yet. It reminds me of trying to get my first note out of the shakuhachi. Now I don't even think about it, but it nearly drove me crazy when I first tried to play.

David A. Hall
18th January 2003, 21:47
Originally posted by Don Cunningham
I think you mean Yumio Nawa sensei. He was in good health when I met with him this past March to discuss my research in jutte and Edo period arresting arts. He was quite active for someone in their 90s. I observed and participated briefly in one of his Masaki Ryu classes on jutte and manriki kusari. Although Nawa sensei wore a keikogi, he sat on the sidelines and mostly just commented on the practice session. He was not actually doing any instruction.

Outside his residence, I noticed he walks with the aid of a cane. In fact, he presented me with a new cane just like his, sort of a lacquered bamboo weave over an oak core, suggesting it would be useful in case I needed to block a katana strike. He also predicted that I would probably need one in about 15 years or so. (I am nearly 50 years old.) Apparently the cane was made by one a Japanese craftsman and one of his peers. We also discussed how sad it is to see such traditional arts fading out as the last practitioners get too old.

He has also responded to several letters with out mentioning any special problems or recent illnesses. Therefore, I would assume that he is still in pretty good health.

David A. Hall
18th January 2003, 21:49
Don,

If you are interested in Massaki Ryu, two of Nawa's top deshi are here in the U.S.: John Quinn and Bruce Brown. Both trained for many years with Nawa in Japan. John is still in close touch with Nawa Sensei.

Dave Hall


Originally posted by Don Cunningham
I think you mean Yumio Nawa sensei. He was in good health when I met with him this past March to discuss my research in jutte and Edo period arresting arts. He was quite active for someone in their 90s. I observed and participated briefly in one of his Masaki Ryu classes on jutte and manriki kusari. Although Nawa sensei wore a keikogi, he sat on the sidelines and mostly just commented on the practice session. He was not actually doing any instruction.

Outside his residence, I noticed he walks with the aid of a cane. In fact, he presented me with a new cane just like his, sort of a lacquered bamboo weave over an oak core, suggesting it would be useful in case I needed to block a katana strike. He also predicted that I would probably need one in about 15 years or so. (I am nearly 50 years old.) Apparently the cane was made by one a Japanese craftsman and one of his peers. We also discussed how sad it is to see such traditional arts fading out as the last practitioners get too old.

He has also responded to several letters with out mentioning any special problems or recent illnesses. Therefore, I would assume that he is still in pretty good health.

kabutoki
23rd January 2003, 08:51
hello,
the book by nawa sensei you all refer to seems to be more than out of print. i wasnīt even able to find it when i was in japan, driving every 2nd hand book dealer crazy...
do you have any idea, where to get a copy of it ? i am thinking of writing my thesis about different weapons from the edo jidai.

thank you very much
karsten

Don Cunningham
23rd January 2003, 13:02
Hi David,

I've talked and corresponded with Mr. Quinn. He is apparently still in touch with Nawa sensei as well. I don't Mr. Brown or how to contact him. He was not mentioned by Nawa sensei or any of his senior students.

Hi Karsten,

You should also keep an eye on eBay. I bought two used copies from their auctions. I also obtained a new copy from Sasuga Books in Cambridge. Last I heard, they can still order some copies from one of their distributors in Japan.

My new copy is now autographed by Nawa sensei. I wouldn't be willing to sell it. I've already sold the other used copies at Japanese swordshows or I would be willing to offer one of them. Good luck in your search.

bakumatsu
5th April 2003, 18:23
Hi;

Can anyone provide some additional insight into the Masakiryu? I have a copy of a Japanese language book written by Nawa sensei who has taught Masakiryu in Tokyo for many years.

I am particularly interested in chain arts such as manriki-kusari and kusarigama. Are any of his students actively teaching Masakiryu or jutte-jutsu in the US?

Please forgive my lack of knowledge about e-budo.com. Iím a new member and would welcome any help.

Ed Harris

Don Cunningham
6th April 2003, 01:06
There one remaining student of Masaki-ryu, John Quinn, teaching in the U.S. Send me an e-mail at don@e-budokai.com, and I will provide his contact information. He's in the Washington, D.C., area.

poryu
3rd February 2009, 06:22
HI

this is a 5 year old thread I found.

I was in Japan last year and visited Masaki Ryu. I trained with Nakajima Sensei in Tokyo. Little guy who was exceptionally friendly and welcoming. One of his students is a friend of mine who took me. Everyone there was very nice.

Only a few people there when I went but had an excellent time.

From what I gather Nawa sensei broke Masaki Ryu into 4 branches. I think the Masaki Ryu Nakajima-ha is the only one currently active as a training dojo., They said something about one other branch meeting occasionally but i may have got that bit wrong.

Very interesting Ryu and was vbery grateful for the chance to train with them

DDATFUS
4th February 2009, 23:21
From what I gather Nawa sensei broke Masaki Ryu into 4 branches. I think the Masaki Ryu Nakajima-ha is the only one currently active as a training dojo., They said something about one other branch meeting occasionally but i may have got that bit wrong.

If I recall correctly, Nawa Sensei set up all of his menkyo kaiden students to run their own independent lines. There is at least one legitimate line active in the US.

Shingan
6th February 2009, 04:33
[QUOTE=bakumatsu;178480]Hi;

Can anyone provide some additional insight into the Masakiryu? I have a copy of a Japanese language book written by Nawa sensei who has taught Masakiryu in Tokyo for many years.

Try and contact Daniel Lee. Daniel is a wealth of knowledge and may be able to assist you.

Regards

Philip Hinshelwood

Ron Beaubien
6th February 2009, 13:53
Can anyone provide some additional insight into the Masakiryu? I have a copy of a Japanese language book written by Nawa sensei who has taught Masakiryu in Tokyo for many years.

I was told by a member of the board of directors of the Nihon Kobudo Shinkokai that although Nawa sensei asked to join their organization but they had to politely turn him away after conducting some research.

Nawa sensei did properly learn from his father, but that there were problems with the lineage. More specifically there was a blank in that line of Masaki-ryu, a period of time between two of the previous headmasters whose lives did not overlap, thus the accurate transmission of the school from one generation to the next was in doubt.

I hope that helps.

Regards,

Ron Beaubien

herb mowery
20th February 2009, 16:48
Hi;

Can anyone provide some additional insight into the Masakiryu? I have a copy of a Japanese language book written by Nawa sensei who has taught Masakiryu in Tokyo for many years.

I am particularly interested in chain arts such as manriki-kusari and kusarigama. Are any of his students actively teaching Masakiryu or jutte-jutsu in the US?

Please forgive my lack of knowledge about e-budo.com. Iím a new member and would welcome any help.

Ed Harris

Hello my name is Herb Mowery i am writing to tell to check out Robert Gruzanski-he posts on here from time to time and is a good friend of mine
his father is one of the few english speaking students of Nawa sensei and his book "The spike and chain "was amazing for it's time you should check with him about chain arts as he has a wealth of knowegde his father passed on to him.
Sincerely;
Herb

Shinobi
26th March 2009, 16:17
I was told by a member of the board of directors of the Nihon Kobudo Shinkokai that although Nawa sensei asked to join their organization but they had to politely turn him away after conducting some research.

Nawa sensei did properly learn from his father, but that there were problems with the lineage. More specifically there was a blank in that line of Masaki-ryu, a period of time between two of the previous headmasters whose lives did not overlap, thus the accurate transmission of the school from one generation to the next was in doubt.


What Ron mentions seems to be what the Bugei Ryuha Daijiten implies on its lineage chart on page 778 for the ryu. There is a dotted line between the 7th head Handa Sakujiro and the 8th head Watanabe Kenji, this dotted line usually equals a gap in time or gap in transmission. So Watanabe might be a chuko-no-so for the ryu.

Thanks Ron for that info!

Shininobi
24th May 2010, 21:05
I just wanted to know if anyone has a lineage for this Ryu. I only have the founder and Nawa sensei. I also understand that Nawa sensei split this ryu into four branches.

I would greatly appreciate any info.

Guy Buyens
25th May 2010, 07:03
Masaki ryu seems to be known as an old art but also as part of multi discipline systems.

Since this is the koryu forum, I think we should discuss here koryu lines and not lines that are incorporated in these multi discipline schools, despite the tendency to present them as koryu lines, which is misleading. With that I donít want to judge any-one or anything but I just think it is different.

On Masaki ryu, I am not an expert and can not comment with any authority but I did come across Masaki Ryu Fukuhara-ha Kusarigamajutsu once. Apparently this is transmitted together with Suio Ryu Iai Kenpo. Whether it is an official line or not, I also canít comment but I enjoyed watching.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxailvILmig

Kusarigama
25th May 2010, 10:15
Masaki ryu seems to be known as an old art but also as part of multi discipline systems.

Since this is the koryu forum, I think we should discuss here koryu lines and not lines that are incorporated in these multi discipline schools, despite the tendency to present them as koryu lines, which is misleading. With that I donít want to judge any-one or anything but I just think it is different.

On Masaki ryu, I am not an expert and can not comment with any authority but I did come across Masaki Ryu Fukuhara-ha Kusarigamajutsu once. Apparently this is transmitted together with Suio Ryu Iai Kenpo. Whether it is an official line or not, I also canít comment but I enjoyed watching.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxailvILmig


"The Masaki Ryu, taught in conjunction with the Suio Ryu

This kusarigama tradition has its roots in the techniques of manrikikusari developed by Masaki Taro Dayu. It was then passed down until the 9th Soke of the Suio Ryu Fukuhara Shinzaemon Kagenori devised arts of kusarigama from the manrikigusari techniques. From this time the Masaki Ryu has been transmitted in conjunction with the Suio Ryu.
The body of the kusarigama is roughly 40cm in length with a chain of approximately 2.5 meters. The blade portion is 15 cm in length and is sharp on its 3 protruding edges.
The tradition contains a total of 16 kata in the Omote and Ura sections all of which are performed in a highly realistic manner. A real kusarigama has a steel weight, which is swing by the chain, however for safetyís sake a less dangerous substitute is used in practice. The techniques include receiving the opponentís blade with the chain portion, wrapping the opponentís body and weapon, receiving the opponentís blade with the body portion and then wrenching it away or stealing it. In particular striking the opponent with the weight portion is deemed the most effective.

Through actually seeing the techniques of the tradition, not just the kusarigama, I think you will be able to understand everything. The simplicity of the techniques that you will see represent the characteristics of the Suio Ryu. This painful simplicity is the essence of the Suio Ryu and the essence of my path."

Bu creates the Man
By Katsuse Yoshimitsu

(Katsuse Yoshimitsu is the 15 Soke of the Suio Ryu Iai Kenpo and 12th Soke of the Masaki Ryu)

For more information on Suio Ryu Iai Kenpo please visit our website:

http://suioryu-usa.org/

Shininobi
25th May 2010, 16:24
Thank you for your information. It is an interesting connection between the Suio Ryu and Masaki Ryu.

Shininobi
1st June 2010, 01:21
I found exactly what I was looking for here

http://www.robertg.com/yumio.htm

Ron Beaubien
1st June 2010, 11:19
I found exactly what I was looking for here

http://www.robertg.com/yumio.htm

You should be aware that there were apparently problems with Nawa Yumio's Masaki-ryu lineage. I do not know the specifics of the situation, but I was told by one of the directors of the Nihon Kobudo Shinkokai that Masaki-ryu under Nawa sensei was denied entry to the organization.

More specifically, I was told that although Nawa sensei did properly learn from his father, further back in the lineage there was a break and so the school under Nawa Sensei was not allowed to join their organization unfortunately.

I hope that helps.

Sincerely,

Ron Beaubien

Shininobi
2nd June 2010, 03:56
Thank you for your information. I will research the matter further.

Hissho
9th June 2010, 18:02
More re: Masaki-ryu. Interesting stuff re: the founder's ki, sumo and other research as well!

http://www.aikidojournal.com/article?articleID=429

Ellis Amdur
10th June 2010, 03:22
Just yesterday, by chance not associated with this thread, I heard sad new, that Laszlo Abel, the person interviewed in the article Chris linked, suddenly died last year. He was about 55 years old. He was driving down a road, felt odd, pulled over and died of a stroke.

Laszlo was a remarkable guy. He trained in Masaki-ryu, Tenjin Shinyo-ryu and some kind of kenjutsu. He was a demon researcher - he could ferret out the most tiny bits of obscure information. For example, he not only found the grave, but also the landlady of Charles Perry, an American who briefly studied Daito-ryu with Takeda Sokaku in appr. 1905.

Laszlo was one of the most pugnacious guys I ever met, particularly when he'd had a few. (he was legend in some bars in Kabukicho, from what I remember). He was also very secretive, almost reclusive, very protective of his sources and his own research. Stanley Pranin, at his widow's request, is going to publish several of his essays (http://www.aikidojournal.com/blog/2010/06/08/thomas-russell-hillier-mcclatchie-1852-Ė-1886-by-laszlo-abel/), one of which has just put up on the Aikido Journal Website

Altogether, a refreshingly unique guy - he had a genius for research like nobody I've ever known - and evenings drinking with him were always an experience. I'm sorry that he's gone.

Ellis Amdur

Hissho
10th June 2010, 03:43
RIP - that's really too bad.

Dean Whittle
10th June 2010, 07:04
Laszlo Abel was the first Australian to study with Hatsumi Masaaki in his Bujinkan system, although, as outlined in that interview, he moved on to study other systems.

I look forward to reading more of his research in time.

May he rest in peace.

With respect

Ron Beaubien
10th June 2010, 13:44
Just yesterday, by chance not associated with this thread, I heard sad new, that Laszlo Abel, the person interviewed in the article Chris linked, suddenly died last year. He was about 55 years old. He was driving down a road, felt odd, pulled over and died of a stroke.

Laszlo was a remarkable guy. He trained in Masaki-ryu, Tenjin Shinyo-ryu and some kind of kenjutsu.

I believe he trained in Shindo Munen-ryu under Ogawa Takeshi sensei. I've seen a picture of them training together before. Perhaps it was even in the print edition of the Aiki News when that interview was originally published.

I am sorry to hear that he is gone. I really enjoyed reading many of the articles he had written.

Regards,

Ron Beaubien

George Kohler
10th June 2010, 15:04
Here is a video of Masaki-ryu with Nawa Yumio in it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CztUm5_ezPY

Cron
10th June 2010, 15:30
Here is a video of Masaki-ryu with Nawa Yumio in it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CztUm5_ezPY

Nice one! Thanks a lot!

Shininobi
12th June 2010, 00:46
Totally sweet!

Kirigakure
18th June 2010, 02:53
Here is a video of Masaki-ryu with Nawa Yumio in it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CztUm5_ezPY

Really nice video! Thank you for sharing.

Cron
18th June 2010, 07:41
Hi,

does somebody have some information about the Nakajima-ha of Masaki ryu?

Best,

poryu
22nd June 2010, 08:38
Hi,

does somebody have some information about the Nakajima-ha of Masaki ryu?

Best,

Hi

Nakajima sensei is just one of 2 current soke of Masaki Ryu that i am aware. He teaches in Tokyo every week, and its where I will be this week and next ;)

the Nakajima-ha will release a website sometime later this year

Shinobi
25th June 2010, 04:18
I found exactly what I was looking for here

http://www.robertg.com/yumio.htm

07. Handa Sakujirō Katsumune

08. Watanabe Kenji Masayuki

Is the "break" (downtime) in the lineage that Ron is talking about, its shown as above in the BRHDJT with a "dashed" line indicating a break or it can also mean that its "questionable" that Watanabe learned it from Handa.