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sepai 85
20th May 2003, 01:47
How do you guys as teachers deal with students with add/adhd ?

sammycerv
20th May 2003, 06:28
Try this link. Past thread. (http://www.e-budo.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?threadid=288)

sepai 85
20th May 2003, 12:54
Thanks a lot sam great thread very helpfull !

wendy ongaro
22nd May 2003, 14:03
that is an excellent thread. one of my girlfriends has her Phd in clinical psychology, and her dissertation looked at brainwaves in children with ADHD. What she found was that stimulants cause kid's brains to have the same wavelengths as meditation practice, and that many children's symptoms often improve after being taught meditation. Being that martial arts teach focus and often incorporate meditative excercises into their classes, it doesn't surprise me how much kids improve once they start practicing.

also, our educational systems are cutting back drastically on physical education, recess, and after school sports. different people learn in different ways, and i often think that many children who are labelled ADHD process information better through their bodies. when they do not have the time or encouragement to "run wild", they don't learn how to process or deal with the information coming through their bodies, and they are expected to sit still and pay attention longer than they are just developmentally able.

I am now a health care worker in adult psychiatry, and a signficant number of my patients are 20 year olds who are meth users who got hooked initially on dextroamphetamine and ritalin for their ADHD. this is a trend that scares the crap out of me, and I hope it is an aberration, and not the norm of folks who grow out of their ADHD meds.

bgb
22nd May 2003, 15:35
Ms. Ongaro,

You might frind this study by the National Institute of Drub Abuse reassuring. According to people who have read it (and I admit I have not) it suggests treated ADHD children are LESS likely to develop substance use problems than those not treated. Access the March 2003 issue from the achive section ofthis site (http://www.helpforadd.com/archives.htm) to read the study.

I haven't read the study and don't know anything about the NIDA as ADHD just isn't my fight but I hope this helps.

Barb Bloom

Prince Loeffler
24th May 2003, 19:13
Here's a link on the same subject matter:

http://hometown.aol.com/bmavin/stein.htm

Bushi Jon
5th June 2003, 19:10
As a father of a child with adhd(hyper boy)I have had to try various methods when controling his path diet ,and my last resort drugs.But what has been my expierence in teaching kata to kids just like my son is they excell with physical activity and rapidly changing task. I found out when we go into the yard to practice kata together after about the second repition I need to change to another move active movement then I need to repeat and praise what he/she is doing during which I have to remind always what the correct behevior is. Remember it is a sickness both mental and physical that can be corrected with love and correction

Prince Loeffler
8th June 2003, 17:37
Originally posted by BUSHI JON
it is a sickness both mental and physical that can be corrected with love and correction


This is so true. We have several of these kids in our class. One of them took his yellow belt test. I have never been so proud. As I was sitting next to my Sensei during the examination. Considering for the last 6 months, he has not been able to pay attention in class for more than 2 minutes.

Yesterday's test really proved my belief that patience and understanding can go a long way. He was almost like the rest of the kids testing and no one would suspect he has ADD. His eyes wandered off a bit, then he starts playing with his belt..but Sensei saw the effort he made during the exam and gave him above average grade.

MarieB
21st June 2003, 06:15
there are no conclusive studies on a proper diet that helps to control add/adhd.

love and gentle correction do work. positive reinforcement is a very good method for improving the focus of ADD kids, as stress that may result from excessive discipline may actually exascerbate the symptoms.

activities that apparently have a long term effect of controlling ADD and calming the mind are yoga, arts, crafts, music (esp classical) and sports. medication also works, though it's expensive. i have read that supplements work in a similar way as medicine does.

some ADD kids are very visual. if this is the case (trouble with following instructions is a hint that auditory processes are not as well developed), then it may help to show to the child pictures of the movements/ techniques. i have also read that asking the child to repeat back any instructions helps to retain them in the child's memory.

the ADD child may need to practice at MA more than the other children, but eventually he/she will get it.

hope this helps...good luck :smilejapa

MarkF
21st June 2003, 10:22
there are no conclusive studies on a proper diet that helps to control add/adhd.


There are no conclusive studies which prove anything other than medication "works." That doesn't mean a change in diet won't help. It is the same with any anecdotal evidence, it is a personal thing. What does help, and what doesn't can be a lifetime search. There are drugs which help a lot including amphetamines and sister drugs such as methylphenidate (Ritalin).

That doesn't mean it is the end of the road or that the trend toward use of meth or becoming a "tweaker" is the norm, it isn't. More likely, a parent will dip into the child's meds to get high. An end to drug therapy needs to be planned well in advance, and if withdrawn at the correct rate, this may not become a problem at all. Many continue to use well into their twenties (prescription drugs) which is an addiction in itself. Parents and doctors must be aware of this, and if good education and counseling from a good clinical pharmacist (as s/he is generally the gateway treatment professional) and other professionals is there and up to date, this can be a problem managed.

Children do not experience the same addictive yearnings after long-term use as adults so withdrawal on schedule with the patient's age taken into account, these drugs can be withdrawn without (major) problems. It doesn't mean there won't be any, it just has to be faced head on.


Mark