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Joseph Svinth
28th August 2000, 22:08
I have recently been told that the style of jujutsu in which W.E. Fairbairn trained was Shinnoshindo-ryu. The only information about this style I found on Google was on a German website ( http://www.djjb.de/html/body_geschichte.html )in which it was said:

"Yamanmoto [sic] Tabizyemon war der Gründer der Shinnoshindo-Ryu. In dieser Schule wurde wie in der Yoshin-Ryu das Jiu Jitsu gepflegt. Die verschiedenen Griffe in diesen zwei Schulen wurden in drei Gruppen klassifiziert:

in Shodan - (Einführungsrang)
in Chudan - (mittlerer Rang)
in Jodan - (oberer Rang)"

Anybody know anything more about the Shinnoshindo-ryu?

Robert Reinberger
28th August 2000, 22:21
Hello,

try

http://www.judo1.net/ju01002.htm

Shinnoshindo Ryu is also mentioned there.

Regards,
Robert

Joseph Svinth
28th August 2000, 23:13
Some additional Fairbairn trivia:

http://merrimack.nara.gov/guide/rg263.html#263.2.3

263.2.3 Records of the Shanghai Municipal Police
Textual Records: Investigation files, 1894-1947 (50 ft. and 67 rolls of microfilm). Records relating to espionage activities in Shanghai, 1926-48. Microfilm copy of Russian emigrant registration cards and certificates, 1940-52 (16 rolls). Microfilm copy of Tsingtao registration forms, 1946-49 (4 rolls). [Note: The latter include dossiers on Sun Yat-sen and Ho Chi Minh. For a description, see http://www.terrorism.net/Pubs/csi/ald.html]

***

http://www.bates.edu/acad/depts/history/390l.html

Shanghai, 1927-1937
History 390l
Dennis Grafflin

Our approach to the Shanghai Municipal Police archives on microfilm is by way of a set of readings that move from a general overview to a specific study:
Wei, Betty Peh-T'i. Shanghai: Crucible of Modern China (Hong Kong: Oxford University Press, 1987).
Eastman, Lloyd, et al. The Nationalist Era in China, 1927-1949 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991).
Henriot, Christian. Shanghai, 1927-1937: Municipal Power, Locality and Modernization (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993). Translation of Shanghai 1927-1937: Elite locales et modernisation dans la Chine nationaliste (Paris: Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, 1991).
Wakeman, Frederic, Jr. Policing Shanghai 1927-1937 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995).
Fournier, Mark. "Defending Imperialist Privilege: The Shanghai Municipal Police and its Special Branch: Political Enforcement During the Nanking Decade." Senior thesis in History, 1996, at Bates College.
Major research resources:
Guide to the Scholarly Resources Microfilm Edition of the Shanghai Municipal Police Files, 1894-1949, with an introduction by Marcia R. Ristaino. (Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources Inc., 1984?).
Reference HV7870.S5 S5 Guide
Shanghai Municipal Police File. (Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources Inc., 1984). 67 reels of positive 35mm microfilm.
Microfilm HV7870.S5 S5 Reel 1 up to Reel 67
[in Level A cabinet]

***

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/ealac/gradconf/abstracts96/24perversion.html

Andrew Field
Columbia University
Regulating Indecency: the Moral Role of the Shanghai Municipal Police, 1920-1940"

During its tenure as the ruling political body of the International Settlement of Shanghai, the Shanghai Municipal Council, whose members tended to be British, kept order mainly through the British-run agency of the Municipal Police. One of the functions of the Shanghai Municipal Police (SMP) was to maintain a moral order in the Settlement. In order to do so, the SMP kept a vigilant eye on public spaces such as hotels, bookstores, theaters and cabarets, and exercised the duty to censor or proscribe any activity, performance, or text that its agents deemed indecent. Ironically, through the very process of censorship the SMP has left the contemporary historian with a record of "obscene" works and deeds that might otherwise have slipped into oblivion. A survey of SMP files suggests that indecency in the Settlement can be separated into four basic categories: 1) texts, 2) photographs and films, 3) performances, and 4) deeds. Through a survey of these files and their contents, this paper will attempt to answer the following questions: What constituted indecency, and where were its boundaries drawn? Were there any significant changes in the definition of indecency during the twenty-year period for which these records exist? Were there any specific patterns to the kinds of materials or performances that the SMP tried to censor? How successful was the SMP in its job as keeper of the moral order?

In answering these questions, I will try to show that one of the rationales behind the act of "regulating indecency" was the maintenance of the image of the British, Americans and other colonial powers as morally superior to the Chinese, and thus better fit to rule. The maintenance of this image was a key factor in the smooth running of colonial government, yet it was constantly being challenged by the seedy realities of the colonial experience. One way for Chinese nationalists to sabotage the colonial project was to create an alternate image of Europeans and Americans as a depraved people, unfit to rule because of their obscene nature. Thus the SMP took particular pains to proscribe materials and activities that promoted the idea--exaggerated perhaps but certainly based on real experience-that Europeans and Americans were sexually promiscuous, particularly in the colonial context.

***

http://mail.bris.ac.uk/~hirab/smp2.html (Robert Bickers, Dept. of Historical Studies, University of Bristol, Bristol, U.K.)
(http://mail.bris.ac.uk/~hirab/smp2.html).
Language: English.
Description: Supplied note: "I have placed online a directory of British (Irish, Welsh, White Russian, some Chinese, some Japanese etc) members of the Shanghai Municipal Police (1900-45). There are about 1700 names and personal details. The site is hardly ambitious, but the information is useful, for those seeking information about minor figures in twentieth century Shanghai history, and also ancestors who were in the force." Only a portion of the information Dr. Bickers has on these men is put on-line. The full records include citations, promotions, sometimes the branch of the force. For any further information about individuals please contact him at http://mail.bris.ac.uk/~hirab/bickers.html.
Information supplied by Robert Bickers, Dept. of Historical Studies, University of Bristol, Bristol, U.K.
Added/revised on 16.01.1999

His book costs $75 --

New Frontier:
Imperialism's New Communities in East Asia, 1842-1953
by Robert Bickers
Manchester University Press, cloth
Due/Published: March 2000
300 pages.

***
http://www.lincs.police.uk/history/history.shtml

From a list of 194 applicants, Colonel Gordon Herbert Ramsey Halland, C.I.E., O.B.E., was selected as Chief Constable of Lincolnshire with effect from the 12th October 1931. He was born in 1888, the son of the Rector of Blyborough, Lincs. and he entered the Indian Police in 1908. He was Principal of the Punjab Police Training School and Officer in Charge of the Fingerprint Bureau of the Punjab from 1921 to 1926. From 1927 to 1930 he assisted in the reorganisation of the Shanghai Municipal Police, and from 1930 to 1931 he was Senior Superintendent of Police at Delhi, as well as being A.D.C. to the Viceroy.

Colonel Halland took office at a difficult period, when economy was essential.

***

http://www.mcauley.acu.edu.au/csaa/Confabs99.htm

Murdoch University, Western Australia

Martin Andrew
The Influence of Pre-War China on Western Military Thought and Training.

When the Chinese Communist Forces were decimated around the Chosin Reservoir in the Korean War they were on the receiving end of tactics first practiced by the Chinese Communists themselves. This occurred because the basic infantry structure of the US Marine Corps owes its origins to Chinese Communist guerrillas operating in Yan’an Province during 1937 and 1938. When modern special forces practice their close quarter battle skills with pistols, knives and martial arts they are practising the skills nurtured in the International Settlement of Shanghai during the 1920s and 30s. This working paper will look at conclusions reached during the presenter’s research into the Shanghai Municipal Police.

Andrew also writes on sex and drugs in Singapore.

***

Personally I think Fairbairn had a point, wanting to move the boys up to .45s from .380s, but it appears he was outvoted by the powers that be, probably because .380s are lots better as pocket pistols.

http://oldguns.net/q&a11_96.htm

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt 1903 ? .380 (hammerless) 6" ? blue 88XXX

The gun has three matching numbers on it, 640. Written on the gun is "Colt's PT.F. Hartford. CT.USA Patented April 20, 1897, Dec 22, 1903". Also written on the gun is "Shanghai Municipal Police". The gun is in very good condition. It has plastic, checked grips.

I am wondering if you know any background on this gun. Such as when was it in use with the Shanghai Police force. I am also wondering if the gun has any value to collectors. I purchased it about five years ago for $125(Can).

Answer:

Mike- Sorry, we cannot match your description to anything specific. My guess is that it is the Model 1908 "Pocket" model, but the barrel length was only 3.75 inches. They were made from 1908 until about 1940. Many of these were purchased for issue to US military officers. I vaguely recall seeing some serial number research relating to arms used by some Chinese quasi-military forces in the early WW2 period, but don't remember where. I suspect a fanatical Colt collector can tell you more… John Spangler

http://www.coltautos.com/cagotm0499.htm

Model M .380 with rare Factory Lanyard Loop. Most of the .380s encountered with factory lanyard loops were produced for the Shanghai Municipal Police contracts of the 1930s. Due to the extremely humid climate, most of these guns are in poor condition with severe pitting and have been refinished at least one time. 94016 is a standard commercial variation, retaining 98% original condition and is complete with the original box numbered to gun, instruction sheet, proper ammunition pamphlet, shooting suggestions, hang tag and two extra two-tone magazines. The serial number is in the range of the SMP contract guns. Aside from the lanyard loop, it has none of the other features associated with the SMP guns (i.e. slide spring, safety screw, magazine with primer viewing holes.)

This gun was purchased in Shanghai, China in the early 1930's by Archie Cecil Barnes, the overseas representative for Tidewater Oil Company (now Arco), whose territory included all of the Middle East.

Neil Hawkins
29th August 2000, 10:26
Not much to add to what's on the link Robert provided, but here's what Ratti and Westbrook have to say (all other references I've found seem to come from them originally):

The Tenjin-Shinyo school of Jujutsu is generally considered to have been the result of a fusion of two ancient schools, the Yoshin Ryu and the Shin-no-Shindo Ryu.

The founder of the Shin-no-Shindo Ryu is said to have been Yamamoto Tamizaemon, of the Osaka Police, who added other techniques to the already impressive repertoire of the Yoshin Ryu. Both schools were finally unified, becoming a systematic whole with a single name in the late seventeenth century, through the efforts of Yanagi Sekizai Minamoto Masatari (also known in his later life as Iso Mataemon), who's astonishing feats of prowess in the art of unarmed combat (particularily in the field of using percussion, atemi-waza) fill many vivid pages in the literature of the martial arts. He is said to have been a remarkable jujutsu instructor, thoroughly versed in the practice and theory of unarmed combat. After studying the techniques of the Yoshin and Shin-no-Shindo Ryu's under Masters Hitotsuyanagi and Homma, respectively, he travelled from scholl to school, challenging local champions. In the course of this pilgrimage (after he opend a school in Edo, where his technique was taught to retainers of the Tokugawa Clan), he is said to have confronted a group of hired mercenaries who had come to extort an exorbitant sum of money from peasants who were sheltering Mataemon (or perhaps had hired him). The records available describe the encounter as a "savage battle" in which the Master and one of his best pupils demonstrated the devastating effects of well-applied atemi-waza, even when employed against professional, armed attackers who, upon this occasion, collected no booty but many bruises - much to the satisfaction of their intended victims. Mataemon was also a consientious theorist who apparently leaned toward an ascetic view of the martial arts.

Surprisingly he placed a strong emphasis on suppleness, he advised his students to apply techniques quickly, but without undue tension, and only when the opponent himself, by attacking, had weakened his own line of defense and provided the major part of that force necessary to subdue him.


I thought it had pretty much died out by Meiji, but may have still been taught in the Osaka Police.

Neil

[Edited by Neil Hawkins on 08-29-2000 at 04:29 AM]

Michael Becker
6th September 2000, 23:02
According to James Shortt* two instructors of this ryu were brought to England in 1937 by W.E. Fairbairn. The instructors names were Yanagi Tani and Pao Hanu ( a Korean ).
They graded a Mr Les Martin Jodan in 1939. I do not know if he is still instructing but a student of his, Peter Robins, is.
In 1990 Mr Martin privately published a book for the law enforcement community which showed modern applications of Shinno Shindo ryu.

*Beginning Jiu Jitsu: Ryoi Shinto Style by James Shortt and Katsuhara Hashimoto

Stephenjudoka
22nd October 2003, 20:28
Has anyone got any information on the Shinnoshindo Ryu School of Ju Jitsu.
I have found a book written by L. Martin "Ease of Restraint" An aid to Law Enforcement Officers.
It mentions The Martin - Fairbairn School of Ju Jitsu founded in 1949.
I am interested in the history of restraint and more information on this school would help paint a picture of the history of this book.

Thanking you in advance.

Stephen Sweetlove

elder999
23rd October 2003, 16:19
I’ve heard it said that the color grading system came from Shinnoshindo-ryu-I don't know how true that is.
Where and with whom Fairbairn studied Shinnoshindo-ryu, or in fact did as he claimed, is one of the mysteries of CQB, and actually something that’s argued about quite a bit in WWII combatives circles.

47th ronin
23rd October 2003, 22:50
Shinshindo-ryu is one of the parent arts of Tenshin-ryu. i have had trouble finding out anything about it since I got the same book. The debate in WWII combatives circle is whether Fairbairn studied Shinshindo-ryu or Tenshin ryu before studying Judo.

Aaron, I am assuming you are referring to the original belt(white, brown and black)? I understodd the coloured belt system as we know it know came from Kawaishi.

Phil Matthews
24th October 2003, 16:47
Hi Stephen,

Could you send me an e-mail mate i've some interesting things i'd like to discuss with you.

regards

phil

thebristolbloke AT yahoo.com (replace the "AT" with an "@" symbol)

Bruce Mitchell
27th October 2003, 21:24
I've done some light research on this and have not been able to find anything that shows that Shinnoshinden ryu survived past the creation of Tenjin Shinyo ryu. I have heard claims that it was kept alive as a secret school only taught to the imperial family, but have yet to see anything to sustantiate this.

My understanding is that Mr. Martin was a really decent fellow and I would love to be able to find out more about his teachers and where they came from (i.e. what part of Japan) and who their teachers were. That info would probably clear a lot of things up.

Is anyone aware of any teachers in Japan teaching this art in the last 150 years?

Joseph Svinth
28th October 2003, 04:32
Use "search" on your control panel, using "shinnoshindo" as your keyword, and you'll find assorted names, to include Mr. Martin.

The most recent mention I've seen was a mention in "Japan Times"; the occasion was the visit of some Hitler Youth to Tokyo, and the event was the exhibition of assorted "old-style" martial arts.

elder999
28th October 2003, 14:57
Originally posted by 47th ronin
Shinshindo-ryu is one of the parent arts of Tenshin-ryu. i have had trouble finding out anything about it since I got the same book. The debate in WWII combatives circle is whether Fairbairn studied Shinshindo-ryu or Tenshin ryu before studying Judo.

Aaron, I am assuming you are referring to the original belt(white, brown and black)? I understodd the coloured belt system as we know it know came from Kawaishi.

Actually, the debate is whether or not he studied anything but "kano jujutsu"- that's what his certificate was in, at any rate, not "judo," though there was little difference at the time.


As for the colored ranking system, I don't know what that meant-it's something several people said to me in passing a long time ago.

Neil Hawkins
29th October 2003, 01:04
Ok, I'll have to go back to my books for the details, but here is the legend, which may or may not be fact.

Shin-no-shindo Ryu was supposedly created in the mid 1500's by Yamamoto Tabizayemon, a master of the Yoshin style of Jujutsu. He lived in Osaka and held a senior position in what was essentially the city police.

He developed the style because many of his men were tasked with restraining Samurai of higher rank than themselves and because of the restrictions of the society could not harm them. The style includes a number of restraining techniques, including strangles and chokes, but virtually no atemi or 'big' throws/takedowns.

It is believed that William Fairbairn studied the style in Shanghai where it was taught by a Japanese who's name eludes me, I am not sure if it was ever mentioned, but I'll look it up. Fairbairn allegedly was so impressed with it that he used parts of it, firstly in his own Shanghai Police training, but then in his WWII combatives.

I cannot comment on Mr L. Martins background, but I am told that he learnt the art during the War and then adapted it into his own style of combatives. I don't believe that the actual Shin-no-Shindo Ryu still existed, during WWII, and that whatever was taught probably included elements from many other styles but there are or have been other instructors in the UK who claim to have links to it.

If memory serves, James Shortt claimed to be from this school as well and wrote some history on it in his "Beginning Jiu Jitsu". Shortt was also from a strong military combatives background and may have learnt from the same instructional lineage, I don't remember. But there should be people still around in the UK who can clarify matters.

I wrote a review of "Ease of Restraint" some years ago but don't remember if it ever got published anywhere, I probably still have a copy if anyone is interested.

Regards

Neil

Stephenjudoka
29th October 2003, 09:27
Neil,

Thank you for your reply. It does co-oberate what I had already found out.

I would be very interested in your review on 'the ease of restraint'.

I have my own feelings about the content of the book and would like to know others thoughts.

Stephen Sweetlove

Phil Matthews
29th October 2003, 11:02
Hi All,



It is believed that William Fairbairn studied the style in Shanghai where it was taught by a Japanese who's name eludes me,

The guy you are thinking about is Professor Okada, all i've been able to find out is that he was definately graded in Kodokan Judo.

I'm more interested in the stuff Fairbairn didn't throw out for WW2 Combatives Instruction so this isn't my field/interest at all really.

I do know that "Ease of Restraint" didn't go down too well with some Police Forces over here, notice i didn't say all just some.



I wrote a review of "Ease of Restraint" some years ago but don't remember if it ever got published anywhere, I probably still have a copy if anyone is interested.

Neil's review of Ease Of Restraint is available on EJMAS here! (http://www.ejmas.com/ejmasreviews.htm#Ease of restraint). It's a very good review of the book itself, good work Neil mate!

As an aside I do know that Dorothea Fairbairn admitted she knew nothing about Okada at all. Jim Shortt's expertise is questionable in a lot of circles, if anyone's does sort this out i'd like to know but as I said this isn't my "thing".


take care all

Neil Hawkins
30th October 2003, 00:59
Thanks Phil,

I am interested in your comments about Shortt, I was researching info on him and some others a few years ago when I was looking into a group called the International Military Combat Advisors Group (ICMAG) it was a European collective of martial artists, combatives instructors and para-medics who were trying to codify various training regimens as well as sell their skills.

I did recieve mixed reports on some of the members, but was told that much of it was 'professional jealousy' and 'inter-corps rivalry'.

If anyone has any info on ICMAG or any of its members, I am still interested.

Regards

Neil

Daniel Lee
30th October 2003, 02:20
Hi Neil,

I think Jim Shortt claimed instruction in Ryoi Shinto-ryu. Their website is http://www.ryoishintoryu.org/.

Simon Lee
17th April 2008, 10:49
My name is Simon Lee
recently changed my surname from Simon Lolley

I was taught Shino-Shindo by the late, great, Les Martin from 1986 onwards.

(I'm the skinny youngster, in need of a good hair cut, in his book)
[wish I was still that age]

I have only just accidently stumbled upon this web site and Thread.

If I can still help with any ones questions I'd be glad to.

Simon

Lance Gatling
17th April 2008, 11:28
........If I can still help with any ones questions I'd be glad to.

Simon

Welcome aboard!

How about a recap of what you've been told of the history? This thread's been dormant for 5 years but might as well start someplace!

Regards,

Bruce Mitchell
17th April 2008, 17:28
...If I can still help with any ones questions I'd be glad to.

Simon

Thank you very much for your offer of assistance. I am also interested in hearing any information that you can provide about the history of the art, particularly the last hundred years or so.

Can you provide any information about any existing links to teachers/schools in Japan?

Can you tell us anything about the current syllabus of the system of of the ranking structure used?
Any information would be appreciated.

Winged_Nemesis
5th January 2009, 21:11
If memory serves, James Shortt claimed to be from this school as well and wrote some history on it in his "Beginning Jiu Jitsu". Shortt was also from a strong military combatives background and may have learnt from the same instructional lineage, I don't remember. But there should be people still around in the UK who can clarify matters.

I wrote a review of "Ease of Restraint" some years ago but don't remember if it ever got published anywhere, I probably still have a copy if anyone is interested.

Regards

Neil

Sad to say, Shortt has no legitimate connections with the UK Military except for a short spell (3 months) with the Territorial Army, after which he was discharged as "Services no longer required". he has NEVER served in the SAS or any other regiment or for that matter "Officially" trained any of HM Forces, to access more detail about his "Pedigree" I suggest you visit:

http://www.arrse.co.uk/cpgn2/Forums/viewtopic/t=109934.html

And

http://www.arrse.co.uk/wiki/James_Shortt

In the cause of truth and openness I will admit I am a member on the aforementioned site and this is just one way of letting people know what you may find yourself involved in when coming into contact with Mr.Shortt.

If any instance of "Dubious" claims in the world of Martial Arts comes to light please let me know by PM I would be most appreciative.

mixedmartialart
29th January 2009, 20:26
Also take a look at a sun article (Not a great newspaper but all the same)

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/campaigns/our_boys/article2183915.ece

Steve Delaney
30th January 2009, 02:34
Also take a look at a sun article (Not a great newspaper but all the same)

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/campaigns/our_boys/article2183915.ece

I laughed my behind off reading that.

George Kohler
30th January 2009, 13:53
I was told by some military friends of mine that he was a "Walter Mitty." I'm not sure what the name actually meant, but right after the name was mentioned they didn't say very good things about him.

Bruce Mitchell
30th January 2009, 18:33
I was told by some military friends of mine that he was a "Walter Mitty." I'm not sure what the name actually meant, but right after the name was mentioned they didn't say very good things about him.
The 'pedia of all things wiki has this to say about Walter Mitty:

Walter Mitty is a fictional character in James Thurber's short story "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty", first published in The New Yorker on March 18, 1939, and in book form in My World— and Welcome to It in 1942. It was made into a film in 1947.

Mitty is a meek, mild man with a vivid fantasy life: in a few dozen paragraphs he imagines himself a wartime pilot, an emergency-room surgeon, and a devil-may-care killer. The character's name has come into more general use to refer to an ineffectual dreamer, appearing in several dictionaries.[1] The American Heritage Dictionary defines a Walter Mitty as "an ordinary, often ineffectual person who indulges in fantastic daydreams of personal triumphs." [2] The most famous of Thurber's inept male protagonists, the character is considered "the archetype for dreamy, hapless, Thurber Man".[3]

Seems to fit Mr. Shortt pretty well.
If any instance of "Dubious" claims in the world of Martial Arts comes to light please let me know by PM I would be most appreciative.
There is a lengthy thread on Ryoi Shinto Ryu with lot's of commentary on Shortt's claims reagrding budo here:http://www.e-budo.com/forum/showthread.php?t=29158&highlight=ryoi

Steve Delaney
3rd February 2009, 16:44
George & Bruce,

Here you go.

CTT Training with J.Shortt at RM Deal (http://www.byronik.com/cqb.html)

Hissho
4th February 2009, 05:14
One can only hope that the real warriors cycling back from the GWOT will cause the posers and Walter Mitty's on both the military and LE fronts to fade into the woodwork.

Chuck.Gordon
4th February 2009, 16:39
Slightly OT, but I gotta say: Arrsepedia rocks.

Steve Delaney
5th February 2009, 00:02
Arrse may be slightly OT, but look at how outrageously OT the claims by Shortt have been.