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Steve Williams
20th August 2007, 23:59
In light of the bad video clips that are out there on the web this thread is for the good or excellent ShorinjiKempo video clips out there......
ONLY good and excellent clips (self defence/embu etc) should be submitted. All "average" clips will not be here for long.
If you see any then post the link on this thread.
If a link is deemed to be unsuitable then the relevent post will be deleted.
Myself and Anders will be the only judges of what constitutes good or excellent in relation to this thread.

Steve Williams
21st August 2007, 00:02
This is the first one to start it off.


From the Rakuto Doin Rakutosai 2007 demonstration. At the butokuden budo centre Kyoto.
The participitants are Kazuhito Morikawa seihanshi 7th dan and Hirohito Morikawa seihanshi 7th dan. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M32dEcTiedY&NR=1)

Steve Williams
21st August 2007, 00:06
Another.


ShorinjiKempo demonstration team from the nippon budokan (including Makino sensei seihanshi 8th dan) at the Japan week in Salamanca. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRc9246qIBg)

Tripitaka of AA
21st August 2007, 21:28
Can we make requests?

I'd like one of Jee Sensei and Graham Nabbs Sensei doing their classic Embu...

But then again, that sort of thing might need the permission on the participants (if YouTube hasn't completely done away with the principals of copyright on clips).

Tripitaka of AA
21st August 2007, 21:30
Has anyone got a good Shakujo/Bo embu?

How about a selection of archive SO Doshin in action?

luar
22nd August 2007, 10:45
FYI it would appear that someone uploaded on YouTube a clip of Aosaka Sensei from ShorinjiKempo It's Technigues and Teachings. This is a WSKO video and could be a copyright violation.

There are some senior Senseis who are oppose to the posting of videos. I believe their concern lies is a lack of control of ourt advance techniques. At the recent Seattle Seminar someone posted a video with highlights of the seminar on YouTube. It was eventually taken down.

ken70
22nd August 2007, 11:54
How about a selection of archive SO Doshin in action?
Yes, that's very interesting : I never seen SO Doshin in action...

Tripitaka of AA
22nd August 2007, 12:11
FYI it would appear that someone uploaded on YouTube a clip of Aosaka Sensei from ShorinjiKempo It's Technigues and Teachings. This is a WSKO video and could be a copyright violation.

.

Would that be the one that titled itself "randori", perhaps?

dirk.bruere
22nd August 2007, 13:10
Yes, that's very interesting : I never seen SO Doshin in action...

I think I saw a movie of him in action once, probably at Honbu when I was there. His techniques look very basic, very hard and far less soft than modern SK.

Dirk

luar
22nd August 2007, 14:11
Would that be the one that titled itself "randori", perhaps?

Yeah and no doubt the training videos will soon follow.

Steve Williams
22nd August 2007, 17:37
As for posting copywrited videos:
If it is already out there and the link is to somewhere like youtube or googlevideo or similar, then I see no problem with linking to it.
If the participtants do not want it in the public domain they should contact the original poster of the video or the sharing site to have it removed.

BUT if it is a good video showing ShorinjiKempo in a good way then I can see no reasonable objection...... if ShorinjiKempo is seen in such a good way then it will increase awareness and membership in nothing but a positive way.

Richard Codling
23rd August 2007, 10:59
Just watched the Rakutosai embu, massively impressive as to be expected from the Morikawas.

I especially like the bit where the baby starts crying halfway through.


Re. Kasio doing techniques, the old hombu promo. video has some footage, which I have an e-copy of as I've mentioned before.

tony leith
23rd August 2007, 16:40
If I remember, the Kaiso footage has him (at a visit to the Shaolin temple in the late 70s) nonchalantly throwing some poor Shaolin monk around as well as a quick burst of him doing very fluid tan en stuff. Tantalising. For my money the best visual record of Kaiso I've seen are the photographs in the old - now sadly out of print - coffee table book, which include some impressive stills of him in action (and like the rest of the photos in the book, calling them 'stills' doesn't really do justice to the impression they convey).

It's difficult to belive there isn't some more footage extant given that technology like hand held cine cameras would presumably have been widely available in Japan by the mid to late 60s. However, I see the problem with just putting it out there - it would be strange if Shorinji Kempo hadn't evolved since his death, and in line with the principles of hokei I would see what his students have done since as adding to his legacy, not detracting from it (after all, if they weren't going to be able to add to the sum total of SK knowledge what would have been the point in Kaiso teaching them).

If film footage of Kaiso were being taken as an absolute referent, then this would I suspect tend to make SK more static as an art, which in the end i suspect would not have conformed to his wishes.

Tony leith

dirk.bruere
23rd August 2007, 16:54
If film footage of Kaiso were being taken as an absolute referent, then this would I suspect tend to make SK more static as an art, which in the end i suspect would not have conformed to his wishes.
Tony leith

Which touches on a wider issue. Namely the requirements of 'art' versus 'combat effectiveness'. For example, there are clearly far more jodan geris in modern SK than old-time SK.

Dirk

Tripitaka of AA
24th August 2007, 07:37
it would be strange if Shorinji Kempo hadn't evolved since his death

It's a shame we didn't have this discussion before the Summer Camp, for that might have been the time and place to ask for Mizuno Sensei's thoughts on that very matter. He is the only one in Britain to have had any sustained teaching directly from Kaiso (Did the elder generation of UK Branchmasters get to train with Kaiso? They would possibly have been to Japan prior to his death in 1980)... I think a lecture on that subject would be fascinating. It has been mentioned before on here that Mizuno Sensei's own Shorinji Kempo has changed over the years and Yamasaki Sensei too.

tony leith
24th August 2007, 09:07
Dirk


Which touches on a wider issue. Namely the requirements of 'art' versus 'combat effectiveness'. For example, there are clearly far more jodan geris in modern SK than old-time SK.

Clearly? On what basis is this assertion being made? A rigourous quantitative analysis of practioners and instructors across the planet over the whole sixty years SK has been in existence? Somehow I doubt it. My own teaching - which reflects what I've been taught, by Mizuno Sensei amongst others - tends to emphasise the jodan geri is useful to improve flexibility, balance, and coordination, but 'practical' kicks are far more likely to be to kinteki or gedan, chudan at a push. I think I'm paraphrashing the late Mori Sensei in saying mei uchi and kinteki geri are pretty much all you actually need for self defence.

In terms of the use of chodan geri for demos and embu, I'm willing to bet that Kaiso's first generation of students were also kicking low flying aircraft for the delectation of the watching public, on the not entirely unreasonable grounds that it's more visually intelligible for the spectators.

Tripitaka

It's a shame we didn't have this discussion before the Summer Camp, for that might have been the time and place to ask for Mizuno Sensei's thoughts on that very matter. He is the only one in Britain to have had any sustained teaching directly from Kaiso

On his most recent visit to Glasgow last November, Sensei was actually talking about how his own practice of SK has evolved over the years, partially to reflect the fact that he's getting older, but also because of his increased technical understanding. He also talked about how his form has gradually changed to resemble an apparently softer approach to goho - or at least one characterised by less reliance on solidity and power, more on commitment of body weight and movement - and how this has increasingly come to resemble Kaiso's mode of executing say, gyaku zuki.

The point I was trying to make is that if historical documents were our models rather than living teachers, then SK would be a static body of knowledge.

Tony leith

sean dixie
24th August 2007, 13:54
Back on track!

Aosaka Sensei doing what he does best.! (http://www.youtube.com/shorinjikempotv)

Some other good stuff there as well.

dirk.bruere
24th August 2007, 15:03
In terms of the use of chodan geri for demos and embu, I'm willing to bet that Kaiso's first generation of students were also kicking low flying aircraft for the delectation of the watching public, on the not entirely unreasonable grounds that it's more visually intelligible for the spectators.
Tony leith

I certainly recall being surprised at the 1985 Taikai in the Budokan when looking at the Japanese embus. Most of them did *not* feature jodan mawashi. Maybe my memory is faulty - anyone else care to comment?

Dirk

sean dixie
24th August 2007, 18:53
According to Mizuno Sensei, the reason for a lack of jodan geri is simply safety - marks wise. It's harder to execute jodan well, so to play safe they didn't do them. Some time ago he told the demonstration team off for lack of jodan geri. (He tells the story in a much more amusing way... :p )

Now post some vids as asked...

dirk.bruere
26th August 2007, 02:07
According to Mizuno Sensei, the reason for a lack of jodan geri is simply safety - marks wise. It's harder to execute jodan well, so to play safe they didn't do them. Some time ago he told the demonstration team off for lack of jodan geri. (He tells the story in a much more amusing way... :p )

Now post some vids as asked...

Your wish is my command...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YA2rOPxKbrI

Dirk

John McCulloch
26th August 2007, 04:42
Thanks Dirk.

For the record keepers out there, the two fellows wearing Hoi who showed embu in the clip were Kosuge-sensei ("What is Shorinji Kempo" book and currently a Branch Master in Kanagawa, Japan) and Sato-sensei (presently Chairman of the Kanagawa Shorinji Kempo Federation).

Sonny Chiba and Sue Shiomi on the other hand never had more than a cursory knowledge of Shorinji Kempo - their main thing was karate-do.

John

dirk.bruere
26th August 2007, 20:04
Sonny Chiba and Sue Shiomi on the other hand never had more than a cursory knowledge of Shorinji Kempo - their main thing was karate-do.

John

I thought Sonny Chiba was ranked Shodan?

Dirk

Tripitaka of AA
27th August 2007, 16:14
In Japan, Shorinji Kempo shodan are ten for a penny! :)

paul browne
27th August 2007, 20:32
In Japan, Shorinji Kempo shodan are ten for a penny! :)

Cheaper if you bid on E-BAY.:)

John McCulloch
29th August 2007, 03:27
I thought Sonny Chiba was ranked Shodan?

Dirk

He was coached by Kaiso for the Shorinji Kempo movie (aka "The Killing Machine") but I think that was the extent of his SK knowledge. His 1st dan status may well have been honorary.

Another reason that I believe he was not a rank-and-file member is that I heard a story from a Japanese Branch Master that Sonny Chiba and some of his movie pals put on a martial arts display in Tokyo in the 70s. As part of it they did SK-style embu. Their performance was pretty good by all accounts and the SK observers were shocked that people with "no experience" could do such a thing. Mind you, the story could be taken the other way.

Mr. Chiba is still kicking (very well for a 68 year old), so maybe we could ask him? :karatekid

John

Ewok
2nd September 2007, 15:50
I heard something interesting today (busen day, *cough*), there apparently is very little footage of Kaiso in action because he was strongly against videoing of techniques. He basically said something along the lines of "if you put it all on video, wheres the point on going to a dojo?".

dirk.bruere
3rd September 2007, 00:22
I heard something interesting today (busen day, *cough*), there apparently is very little footage of Kaiso in action because he was strongly against videoing of techniques. He basically said something along the lines of "if you put it all on video, wheres the point on going to a dojo?".

That sounds like a strong endorsement of the effectiveness of video!
I think he was mistaken though.
There should be a lot more involved in going to a dojo than learning techniques.

Dirk

Ewok
3rd September 2007, 01:22
That sounds like a strong endorsement of the effectiveness of video!
I think he was mistaken though.
There should be a lot more involved in going to a dojo than learning techniques.

Dirk

There is more involved in going to the dojo - thats the point. If people wanted to just learn the techniques, then you can sidestep everything thats involved in Shorinji and just copy some video until you get it half right. But you aren't going to be getting the kumite shutai. You aren't going to learn about the other things either.

While we *do* have DVD's now, and you might be able to do some of the techniques just by watching, you'll only be able to do the basic kihon pattern. You aren't going to have a sensei watching over you going "well if the other guy is taller than you, its better to do this. And if they push instead of pull, then you do this" etc.

Apparently the kyohan is similar - its written so that someone who knows the technique can look it up and go "ahh, thats what it is" and remember it, but someone cannot just read about something they don't know, and be able to do it straight away.

dirk.bruere
3rd September 2007, 03:35
While we *do* have DVD's now, and you might be able to do some of the techniques just by watching, you'll only be able to do the basic kihon pattern. You aren't going to have a sensei watching over you going "well if the other guy is taller than you, its better to do this. And if they push instead of pull, then you do this" etc.


I'm not sure that's true, esp for someone who has a lot of martial arts experience. Any senior kenshi should, in my opinion, be able to watch a technique on a video and execute correctly it with a bit of practice. They should also be able to fill in the gaps. Of course, it does need a training partner.

Dirk

Ewok
3rd September 2007, 04:21
I'm not sure that's true, esp for someone who has a lot of martial arts experience. Any senior kenshi should, in my opinion, be able to watch a technique on a video and execute correctly it with a bit of practice. They should also be able to fill in the gaps. Of course, it does need a training partner.

Dirk

Sure, you could show someone a video of kiri-gote, and they'd be able to do a similar thing. But unless it is mentioned in the video would they also learn about using the idea of seichusen to maximise the effect? What about the different ways of doing kirigote? (Some people open their right hand and "guide" it down the seichusen, some people grasp the attackers wrist with their own right hand).

Watching a technique might give you an idea of how to do it, but its not going to be a substitute for having someone explain it to you in person and give you feedback.

tony leith
4th September 2007, 09:26
I have to say I agree totally. There is no substitute for live interaction with a teacher. I am currently trying to learn the yondan syllabus, with there not being anybody within a couple of hundred miles in a position to actually teach it to me.

Even peer support doesn't do the same job - between us, the sandans resident in Scotland have probably seen the entire syllabus, and can work on developing what we already know. However, when it comes to putting new information in there, you really need at least a yon dan offering guidance.

Now, I don't want to whinge too much, because I have the good fortune to live in the UK with a resident 8th dan chief instructor, and also access to the BSKF Senior Instructors' Group. Also by comparison with Mizuno Sensei's own challenges when he first came to Britain (being on the other side of the planet from his seniors), I have no problems at all.

Dirk

Any senior kenshi should, in my opinion, be able to watch a technique on a video and execute correctly it with a bit of practice. They should also be able to fill in the gaps. Of course, it does need a training partner.

Ahem. This might just about be true of goho waza, but I seriously doubt that most kenshi up to my grade would be able to 'learn' a juho technique from scratch from a video. There are just too many subtleties involved in executing a technique well - crude approximations won't do, and in the end are likely to waste a lot of time and effort.

Tony leith

sean dixie
4th September 2007, 10:23
I am currently trying to learn the yondan syllabus, with there not being anybody within a couple of hundred miles in a position to actually teach it to me. Tony leith

How are those notes Tony? Can't make head nor tail of mine! :p

tony leith
4th September 2007, 10:42
How are those notes Tony? Can't make head nor tail of mine!

I have to say, surprisingly intelligible. For those of you wondering what the hell we're talking about - we were both at summer camp, and both taking notes on our syllabus techniques in the hope that it might help the instruction we were getting to stick.

I have to say i don't usually find my own notes all that helpful - what seemed like a blinding insight at the time might not seem all that helpful six months later when you can't remember exactly what you were being shown. My notes therefore were basically intended to record basic information about the techniques so I can get to the point of name recognition.

This might not seem like much of an ambition, but believe me, with some of them it would constitute progress.

Tony leith

PS where my notes become frankly comical is where I attempt to draw vector diagrams to indicate the forces being applied in juho techniques. Lots of arrows going every which way. Handy.

PPS I wouldn't deny that a video record would be handy once you've actually learned the techniques as a reminder, but it's the feedback from a sensei you need. I didn't understand at all what was supposed to be going on with osae kannuki nage (uchi) until I asked Sensei Peter Moore to apply it to me. You have to actually experienc ethe quality of the pain being inflicted by somebody who knows whatthey're doing before you have a hope of replicating it.

hwijaya
4th September 2007, 19:27
Gassho,

Moscow Branch Shorinji Kempo preparation for 2007 European Taikai: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbTjA79O89U

Kesshu,
Herdi Wijaya
Caltech & South Bay Shorinji Kempo.

CEB
4th September 2007, 20:04
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byAvGP1GqBU

JL.
4th September 2007, 23:36
Gassho!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byAvGP1GqBUThat one is, if I'm not entirely mistaken, from The Way Of The Warrior. There is a longer version in four parts on YouTube!, too.

Kesshu,
______ Jan.

paul browne
21st September 2007, 20:21
Gassho

Hi,
I havn't looked through all this thread so if it's been posted before sorry.
if not it contains excellent technique and embu construction info from ,I think, Sanada Sensei of Tokyo University (If not please put me right:))
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=m3RkNjiWhTg

Regards
Paul
Kesshu

paul browne
29th September 2007, 14:18
Hi,
Someone (a Japanese Kenshi) has been posting some new clips in the last few months.
This is one of them (with a beautiful Machi Geri at 46 seconds:))
Enjoy
Paul

Tripitaka of AA
29th September 2007, 14:55
ahem


cough, cough
A link would be nice!

Ewok
29th September 2007, 15:03
ahem


cough, cough
A link would be nice!

And I thought I was going crazy.. :)

paul browne
29th September 2007, 16:03
Mmmmmmmm, spoon feeding they want!!!
Sending the link telepathically for hours I have been..... less gifted in the force are you, so here it is.
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=dPbQUJZ9vak

Losing mind too am I:)

paulyodapaulyodapaulyoda.

Rob Gassin
16th April 2009, 14:04
An interesting video clip to add to the collection.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTlIW81Wu_8&feature=related

Tripitaka of AA
16th April 2009, 16:52
Nice find Rob. Perhaps Leon can give us the translation of the description. My guess is a Uni or High School Demo.. not particularly orthodox presentation, but a lot of fun and the technical performance should remove any doubts as to the quality of the training available in High School/Uni in Japan. Lots of references to popular culture, re: Manga/Anime and the classic movies like "The Matrix", etc. At 4mins and 32 secs, it is a bit long for a competition Embu, but the choreography was very theatrical and told a story very well... I think. As always, demonstration displays serve a number of functions, and are often geared toward entertaining the non-kenshi... while also giving the participants a valuable insight into how "pressure" can affect their performance of techniques that they might think they know "perfectly".

JL.
16th April 2009, 20:39
Gassho!

Frankly, I thought it was a joke.
I agree on the considerable technical abilities displayed by all parties, but as to the purpose and overall impression I'm rather puzzled. Of course it's hard to tell without context and translation/understanding of what was said. But that's the danger with putting stuff online, after all. Even the description on YouTube is completely in Japanese whereas the (so far few and very positive!) commentaries are all English. This indicates that the video might not have achieved what it was meant to (whatever that might be).
Of course, since nowhere on there does it say "Shorinjikempo" it can hardly leave a bad impression of our art, I suppose. Maybe one should leave it at that

Kesshu,
______ Jan. (aka "he who mostly lurks these days" ^^)

colin linz
16th April 2009, 22:39
Jan, I think it is a joke too; but then again so did the kenshi performing it. Personally I don't have a problem with people having some fun with their training. I really doubt that anyone viewing it would take it too seriously. It is fairly obvious in its humor. It would make a nice change of pace to a demonstration after sitting through a lengthy serious component. This type of embu still shows the technical skill of kenshi, but it also shows the humanity and camaraderie of kenshi as well.

I seem to remember another embu based on popular movie culture. It was performed at Hombu at the closing ceremonies of the 1989 Taikai. From memory it may have been a BSKF team doing a Bruce Lee skit?

Rob Gassin
17th April 2009, 03:05
Humorous demos are not uncommon in SK. At the closing ceremony of the Hombu training camp I attended in 2007, some of the Uni kenshi put on some very funny ones, which at the same time, showcased their skill.

I, for one, am in favour of variety in demonstrations.

In fact, in contrast to Jan, I am disappointed that the fact that it is SK is not advertised. I agree with Colin that it advertises to the world that kenshi do not take themselves too seriously and SK can be fun. It also stands out from the all too common performances of Tenchiken and embu, which after the first 10, all start to look the same, to non-kenshi.

PeterL
17th April 2009, 05:18
1) Of course it's hard to tell without context and translation/understanding of what was said.


2) Of course, since nowhere on there does it say "Shorinjikempo" it can hardly leave a bad impression of our art, I suppose. Maybe one should leave it at that

It is from a Keio University "festival" . The University festivals are "light hearted", fun events and typical include a lot of "clubs" putting on a show of what they do while at the same time incorporating "humor and fun" into the show. Displays by various clubs include MAs, bands, language clubs, magic clubs, etc.

Even the "serious" groups try and have a bit of fun at this time. The emphasis of these tend to be on fun! (here is a link to a "band performing so you can get an idea of the mood http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3qi7twmq5Q )


2) actually in the description it does say Shorinji Kempo.

However, like Rob, I think this is a great video as it shows skils and that Shorinji Kempo people are a lot of fun. I think it would be very hard to misinterpret this as "serious".

BTW, this guys show great skills. If you think of the time and effort and how fun it must have been to put on this "show", I think it is a very good example of how kenshi can develop good relationships, have fun and excel at something.

JL.
17th April 2009, 09:06
2) actually in the description it does say Shorinji Kempo.That's not what I said. ;)

JL

Tripitaka of AA
17th April 2009, 12:36
Good Embu should conform to specific rules and guidelines to allow for accurate judging and fair comparison. Good Demonstrations are a different beast entirely, and creativity and entertainment are paramount. Judging your audience is crucial - and sometimes video clips can be shown without the contextual reference points that made the demonstration relevant for the audience that were present.

Just to add more detail to the drift associated with the recent clip;

I asked Yoriko (Mrs T) to read the few notes shown on the YouTube page for the clip and she gave me "Keio" and "MitaMatsuri" (festival). I think the reference to Pride is just detailing that the music for the demo is taken from the TV presentation of the "Pride" Mixed Martial Art tournament matches which were so popular on Japanese TV a while back.

To further assist us in understanding the context.. see this clip from a very popular TV show in Japan (this one is quite old now), where teams have created their own sketch - with a big emphasis on "creativity". You can go on a YouTube crawl and find loads of these home-made sketches, that were shown in competition against each other on prime-time TV. Some of the ideas are amazing, and the teamwork is extraordinary; Matrix Ping-Pong (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dcmDscwEcI&NR=1)

And for a non-Shorinji demo that combined comedy elements, you won't find much better than "Boot To The Head" (http://www.martialartsvideojukebox.com/catalog/boot-to-the-head.html), which is a re-enactment of an old radio sketch, apparently.

Rob Gassin
30th August 2009, 06:52
A promo clip for a program on Indian TV, featuring SK.

Features Sensei Maxwell Anthony, who has previously contributed to this forum.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCpm0CPHmAs

Jeremy Williams
30th August 2009, 08:38
A promo clip for a program on Indian TV, featuring SK.

Features Sensei Maxwell Anthony, who has previously contributed to this forum.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCpm0CPHmAs

That must be the the rarely seen, legendarily elusive Kongo Zen Shorinji Rugbykenpo judging by the body tackle toward the end.

Rob Gassin
30th August 2009, 11:10
That must be the the rarely seen, legendarily elusive Kongo Zen Shorinji Rugbykenpo judging by the body tackle toward the end.

Interestingly enough, the last time I was at Hombu, a similar technique was demonstrated to my group, as a variation of kusshin zuki.

Max was in Melbourne late last year. He is a very spiritual guy with a deep understanding of and respect for SK philosophy and a very practical approach to teaching SK physical techniques. His techniques are unmistakeably SK, very fluid, very practical and very effective.

paul browne
30th August 2009, 12:30
Gassho,

That must be the the rarely seen, legendarily elusive Kongo Zen Shorinji Rugbykenpo judging by the body tackle toward the end.

I don't know if that technique has a 'Shorinji Kempo' name but it's a fairly common Judo technique (a girl i work with who is ranked 5th in the UK uses it as her specialist competition technique) and I've been dropped with it in randori, so it's worth knowing just to learn how to stop it:).


Paul

kesshu

Jeremy Williams
31st August 2009, 01:10
Gassho,


I don't know if that technique has a 'Shorinji Kempo' name but it's a fairly common Judo technique (a girl i work with who is ranked 5th in the UK uses it as her specialist competition technique) and I've been dropped with it in randori, so it's worth knowing just to learn how to stop it:).


Paul

kesshu

I suspect that, or similar, has been around since the dawn of time. I've seen that applied in school playgrounds and on pitches all my life. Still can't help looking around for the ball...

ken70
31st August 2009, 12:04
A promo clip for a program on Indian TV, featuring SK.

Features Sensei Maxwell Anthony, who has previously contributed to this forum.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCpm0CPHmAs

Very nice video. :)
I like it!

Rob Gassin
16th September 2009, 02:34
The complete program, posted on youtube, in 4 parts

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tApTNUcWgcM part:1


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-6mwDqeLgM part:2


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwIGudTSS_E part:3


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7yyxdWJAqQ part:4

Tripitaka of AA
16th September 2009, 04:22
I've seen a few TV reports about Shorinji Kempo over the years. This was a pretty good example of this type of feature. Very often, the best you can hope for is a 3 or 4 minute slot on a Live magazine program where it becomes a real struggle to fit a lifetime of training into a video nutshell. This filmed report, produced as a program away from a TV studio (thereby allowing the TV company to show it again, whenever they need to fill a slot), made for quite entertaining viewing for non-kenshi. It appears to be part of an ongoing series of programs where the Presenter takes a "Joe Public" and introduces them to some previously unknown past-time. I found the Presenter attractive and she seemed very professional in both the filmed sequences and also the voice-over work. I've seen a lot worse reports and far greater errors given out by sloppy reporting - despite the best efforts of Kenshi, journalists will never get EVERYthing right - this was pretty good. A friend of mine has been working for years on daytime TV doing stuff like this and when you see into their world a little, you begin to realise how difficult it can be to meet all the criteria for honest, entertaining and accurate TV.

Maxwell Sensei came across particularly well, I thought. An articulate man whose explanations seemed to fit very well into TV-soundbite editing style. I still haven't quite grasped why Maxwell Sensei uses the title "Kongo Zen Shorinji Kempo"... is there another "Shorinji Kempo" in India?

Rob Gassin
16th November 2009, 02:05
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfyD_UVfBoM

Check out the speed of some of these guys.

JL.
16th November 2009, 10:12
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfyD_UVfBoM4:31ff. :eek:

Did anyone else notice how at the end of the last embu kosha completely failed to do proper gassho rei? Outrageous! ;)

Jan

PeterL
16th November 2009, 12:38
4:31ff. :eek:

Did anyone else notice how at the end of the last embu kosha completely failed to do proper gassho rei? Outrageous! ;)

Jan


Probably gave some lame excuse, too.....


"I was tied up at the moment...."

;)

JL.
16th November 2009, 12:58
Yeah, I get that aaaall the time!

Jan

luar
16th November 2009, 13:44
I could not resist

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1G8DOmGCQIk

Tripitaka of AA
16th November 2009, 15:49
5'31" - 5'36" the haraiuke zuki followed by jodan geri... fantastic timing of the photographer directly behind them, whose flash ignites at the point of impact on the keri.

This is the demo team from the Budokan that were in Europe recently. Various other arts would have been presented - I think I made a link to the planned demo a few months ago.

My video playback had a kind of horizontal squishing distortion that made everyone look very tall but with tiny feet. Still loved it :).

Tripitaka of AA
16th November 2009, 15:54
Raul.. that clip... oh my... Valeri suggests that he saw only kesshu game and hasso gamae.. I'm sorry to say, I thought it also included an attempt at tenchiken daiichi.

Tripitaka of AA
15th December 2009, 23:19
Moscow Branch have been producing some great videos. Have we seen this one before? I hadn't, I think it certainly deserves a place on this thread.
It is titled "Shorinji Kempo. Russia. Moscow branch WSKO in "Kanon" club (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cJEbGc-43o&feature=related)"