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bu-kusa
3rd May 2009, 23:12
After yet again reading through my translation of the Gorin no Sho, I found mentioned that other works of Miyamoto Musashi were available. I have done a brief search but couldnít see if there were any accurate translations of the Hyoho Sanjukajo, Dokkodo and Hyoho Shiji ni Kajo available. The Dokkodo available on wikipeadia was far different in tranlation to the extract on hyoho.com and it was apparent that in order to start to understand it I would need a primer on both history and the literature style (Buddhist influences) Can anyone point me in the right direction?

Edit: Iíve just found a review of Miyamoto Musashi: His Life and Writings (Hardcover) by Kenji Tokitsu, by Mr Colin Watkin, which seems to be some of what Iím looking for, has there been any other books which may offer additional, or more accurate information?

Bruce Mitchell
4th May 2009, 03:49
Tokitsu is pretty good, but I think that he goes astray when he starts extrapolating on Musashi's theories based on his Karate experience. Karate is not koryu bujutsu. I prefer William Scott Wilson's Lone Samurai and would recommend reading Wilson and Tokitsu together for a more balanced view.

bu-kusa
4th May 2009, 16:19
Thanks, I was thinking of starting with Wilson and when finished going onto Tokitsu, do either have sections on the Hyoho Sanjukajo, Dokkodo and Hyoho Shiji ni Kajo or other extant writings of Musashi?

Bruce Mitchell
4th May 2009, 17:03
Tokitsu has the following:
by Musashi
Gorin no sho
Hyodokyo
Hyoho sanju go kajo
Hyoho shiju ni kaju
Dokkodo

by his disciples
Hyoho shin ki tai oboe gaki
Senki niten ryu
Musashi ryu shugyo kokoroe no koto

Wilson is less complete, but has a better analysis of Musashi's writings in my opinion.

You should also probably read some books about Jodo Shinshu Buddhist, but I have no suggestions here (not my area of interest). Try posting in the Buddhism section here and you might get some good leads.

bu-kusa
4th May 2009, 19:37
Excellent, thank you very much, once I'm through with Wilson and I have the time Ill look into Jodo Shinshu Buddhism and Tokitsu.

That should see me entertained on long train journeys for a good long while!

Many thanks Mr Mitchell

Joseph Svinth
5th May 2009, 01:58
You might want to check out Professor Bodiford's essays in "Martial Arts of the World: An Encyclopedia," edited by Thomas A. Green (ABC-CLIO, 2001). It's out of print, but the reference section at the library may have a copy.

ScottUK
5th May 2009, 10:08
by his disciples
Hyoho shin ki tai oboe gaki
Senki niten ryu
Musashi ryu shugyo kokoroe no kotoThere is also the Nitenki (which has eluded me for years).

Drop Hyaku a line and see if his translation of Dokkodo ever got completed.

bu-kusa
8th May 2009, 18:10
Brillient, Thank you Scott!