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Thread: Aikido Flavours: Aikikai to Yoshinkan: What's in a Name?

  1. #136
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Louisville
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    Default

    I like most of Mr Seagal's movies, but I haven't seen much of O'Sensei's spiritual philosophy represented.

    Maybe one day he will show us a different side.
    LaRon Anderson Student of
    Shotokan Karate Do

  2. #137
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    Jan 2010
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    Red Deer
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    Default Overwhelming

    I'm an Aikido novice.
    This thread (and site) was referred to me by an Aikidoka in another forum in another web site as I had asked about different "styles".
    Some very learned individuals in here! As a novice I could barely get through some of the discussions and I admit I "sped-read" some posts due to the Japanese terminology/language and the indepth, almost thesis-like discourses.
    I have to say I'm overwhelmed. I do not want the divisions in the aikido community and the different "flavours" and the in-depth history to affect my passion for Aikido and divert my neophyte attentions from what I should be learning.
    I have been advised by other Aikidoka to not rely on literature, history or concepts but just train.
    But I get anxious as I feel that I should know certain things; but as I said I'm feeling overwhelmed.
    I liked the one post best that said Aikido is evolving and Osensei said to his disciples to continue that.
    I also had a light bulb moment from the one person that said Aikido is maleable in the hands of the individual sensei and that is Aikido's strength and differentiates it from the other MAs (among the other obvious differences). <NOT A QUOTE.>
    I know in my heart Aikido is ultimately a self-discovery DO: I will default to that (and Osenseis visions) when my anxiety rears itself.
    Thank-you
    Advice? Comments?

  3. #138
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
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    Hiroshima, Japan.
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    Mr Leslie,

    Welcome to E-Budo.

    This is a large general forum and is regularly visited by beginners and also by those who have many years experience in one or more arts. This is something you will have have to get used to.

    When I was in your situation, I did not read anything for several years. I simply did to the best of my ability what my teacher(s) showed. Of course, there was a gap, sometimes a wide gap, but very often I was shown by someone more experienced, or given hints to work things out for myself. Thus, my knowledge of the different 'flavours' of aikido came after I had already acquired some sort of foundation--in the dojo on the mat.

    Nowadays, prospective students are sometimes advised to visit different dojos and so they sometimes see different flavours before they are in a position to appreciate why they are different. I think there is little point in knowing about all the different 'styles' before you have learned the basics of one of them, and with a teacher who is also able to teach you.

    Best wishes,
    Peter Goldsbury
    Hiroshima, Japan

  4. #139
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    Default Thx

    Thank-you Professor. I'm somewhat older and I envy the youth in class with their empty cups, lack of ego and natural flexibility. I will endeavor to persevere and take things as they come until I'm compelled to learn.

    Sincerely

  5. #140
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    Mr Leslie,

    Well, I started when I was 25 and that was many years ago. In my own dojo, here in Hiroshima, I can see the vast improvement in the few students who started after they had retired from regular work. For them there are different challenges to overcome from the challenges the youngsters.

    One problem in a large dojo is the 'one model fits all' mentality. I think this is not suitable and so sometimes the class is split into three groups: those working on ukemi; relative beginners who need to work out the mechanics of waza; and yudansha who need to practice freestyle and randori. Since numbers are comparatively small (about twelve to fifteen students per class), the dojo is large, and there is a good mix of levels, this is quite possible.

    Best wishes,
    Peter Goldsbury
    Hiroshima, Japan

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