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Thread: Yagyu Shinkage ryu heiho

  1. #16
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    Default Wow!

    Yikes! Sounds pretty serious. I hope it's nothing life threatening. Let's see, friendly banter on e-budo suddenly turns deadly serious, mentions of private e-mails are made, yep, it can only mean one thing. Diagnosis; politics. I guess that's the end of this topic...

    Nathan Sherrard

  2. #17
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    Default

    Gentlemen,
    No, no, not politics of any sort. It is, in my opinion, a matter of all of us recognising the limitations of civil discourse on a public forum.
    Let us say Mr. Craik sampled my paella. If he has any sort of discernment, his account of the meal among his colleagues might be something along the lines of "Geemenintly! I nearly wet my pants in ecstasy that stuff was so good! I mean, every bite was a mouthful of Paradise itself!?E Or, he might confide to them that the meal was the gustatory equivalent of root canal work and that, in a side-by-side comparison, rat poison might edge out my paella in his culinary preferences.
    Either opinion might be appropriate in private conversation. On a public forum? Such commentaries would be thought either fulsome or gauche when offered to a general audience. They are too personal.
    If anyone wants to comment on an author's work, especially negatively and especially in the context of a review, that is one thing. (Save for those concerning my own work, which is uniformly indefectible.) But ad hominem criticism seems out of bounds and ungracious.
    As I observed to Mr. Craik, most of those engaging here have e-mail addresses available and if private comments on these matters are solicited; fine. But I would not want to partake in publicly unprovoked attacks that would accomplish little save for reducing the level of comity here and I don't believe any of you would, either.

    Cordially,
    Dave Lowry

  3. #18
    Henrik Jonsson Guest

    Default

    Originally posted by Dave Lowry
    But I would not want to partake in publicly unprovoked attacks that would accomplish little save for reducing the level of comity here and I don't believe any of you would, either.
    Crap! That Common Sense-jutsu always gets me.

    If only there was something in my head to stop the things coming
    out of my keyboard. :-)

  4. #19
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    Default Just go easy on the saffron, please

    In all fairness, I don't think anyone here would have expected an ad hominem attack against the author, only an opinion of the material from someone familiar with the content. But I understand your position.

    Perhaps we could at least get a studied review of The Amorous Adventures of Ashida Kim? Now that would be interesting..
    David F. Craik

  5. #20
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    Wink hmmm

    Either opinion might be appropriate in private conversation. On a public forum? Such commentaries would be thought either fulsome or gauche when offered to a general audience.

    Mr. Lowry, if I remember correctly, aren't you also a restaurant critic for a St. Louis magazine?
    David F. Craik

  6. #21
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    Default OK, let's all take a step back

    Let us imagine for a moment that I am attending the grand opening of a new four-star restaurant. Also at the gathering are more than a few experienced food critics. My palate is not possessed of the same level of sophistication as the gentlemen I'm seated with, but no matter, I intend to enjoy the various dishes nonetheless. The first dish arrives: Seared Foie Gras with sour cherries, figs, vin santo and candied ginger. Yum! But as the first bite touches my tongue, something seems off.
    "Is this supposed to be really fantastic?" I ask myself. "I really don't know, maybe that's just the way Foie Gras is done. I just wish I could ask someone if this were a fine example of this dish. Aha! I'll ask one of these here food critics."
    Me: "Excuse me, sirs, can you tell me anything about this dish? What do you think of it?"
    Food Critic: "Well, young whippersnapper, you think your pretty hot stuff, eh? Why don't you just pick the meal apart piece by piece, figure out how they cooked it, and then go cook it yourself. Yeah, sure, give that a try, see how you do <snicker snicker>."
    Me: "But I just wanted to know if..."
    Food Critic: "Whoah there. Let me give you an analogy. Let's say I was a martial artist..."

    Please note this is meant only in a humorous way, but it also reflects to some degree my (perhaps biased) view of this thread. I understand perfectly the theory of "if you don't have something nice to say, don't say anything at all." I'm a bit less familiar with "if you don't have something nice to say, say something flippant." OK, *sulk off* Talk to ya'll later.

    Nathan Sherrard

  7. #22
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    Default Food for thought

    When I first saw Mr. Watanabe in a demo in about 1980, I was told by people who should know (research will either verify or discount - if true, it may answer a few questions people have posed):

    Mr. Watanabe's father was well-known as a top-level YSR exponent, with the highest level of licensing. i've only heard very respectful things said of him.

    Mr. Watanabe, to the best of my knowledge, got his formal YSR from his father. I do not believe that he had any other teachers.

    His father died when Mr. Watanabe was quite young.

    With respect

    Ellis Amdur

  8. #23
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    Default Interesting

    Mr. Amdur, thank you for the info, I appreciate it.

    Nathan Sherrard

  9. #24
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    Default Yagyu Ryu?!

    Hi All!
    In Serge Mols "Classical Fighting Arts of Japan" there ist reference to a Yagyu Ryu. Is this ryu the same as the Yagyu Shinkage Ryu? There are pictures of the Ryus Hichuden no Maki. I guess Chuden means middel Lvel teaching(or similar) what does Hi mean? Yagyu Ryu also seems to have kamajutsu in the curriculum (reference for this could be found in Mr. Mols Book on Weapons). Anyone has a clue?
    Kind Regards
    Sven
    Sven Beulke
    sven@bugei.org
    Bremen, Germany

  10. #25
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    Default Yagyu Shinkage Ryu - 22nd Generation Soke

    Hello, folks. A local culture-zine called "Gekkan Nagoya" (Nagoya Monthly) has a little feature on the new soke of (Owari) Yagyu Shinkage-ryu. I figured some might be interested, so I translated it. Here you are:

    Carrying 440 years of history, the 22nd-generation soke
    Shinkage-ryu, created by Kamiizumi Ise-no-kami at the end of the Muromachi Period. Under the auspices of the Owari Tokugawa clan, Yagyu Shinkage-ryu Heiho, familiar to many due to Yagyu Jubei and others, has continued down even to today, preserving the old forms since the days of the 2nd generation soke, Yagyu Munetoshi.

    Yagyu Koichi, 55, is the 22nd generation
    soke. Centered in Nagoya, he guides roughly 300 students in the heart and technique of Shinkage-ryu.

    A Surprising Encounter -- Grandmother and Yagyu Shinkage-ryu

    "My encounter with Yagyu Shinkage-ryu can be summed up in one word. 'Surprise.' Becoming soke, as well, I think now I was being guided by my ancestors."

    Born in Tokyo, Yagyu Koichi lived with his parents, his brother, and his paternal grandmother. In a life centered around his blind grandmother, he naturally learned compassion for others, and a spirit of self-sufficiency.

    When he was 9 years old, he casually told his grandmother an anecdote about Yagyu Shinkage-ryu that he learned from a comic book. His grandmother responded, "You know, I am the daughter of Yagyu Toshichika sensei, the 19th soke of Yagyu Shinkage-ryu."

    Koichi was amazed, and this was the start of a strong adoration of Shinkage-ryu. In junior high and high school, he threw himself into kendo. But upon entering Musashi University as an economics student, he learned that the Yagyukai had lectures in Tokyo, and joined without a moment's hesitation. Twice a month, he received the guidance of 21st soke Yagyu Nobuharu, his father's cousin.

    After graduating, he began working for a large bank. While working he continued his training. There were times when he arrived late, but he never considered quitting.

    "Shinkage-ryu is a part of my life. I can't imagine my life without it," he says.

    To continue the Yagyu Shinkage-ryu tradition of direct transmission to son and heir, in 2000, at the age of fifty, he resigned from the bank and was adopted into the Yagyu family. He moved to Nagoya and devoted himself to the Way of the Sword. After four years of refining his skills, he officially inherited Yagyu Shinkage-ryu in February of last year, becoming the 22nd soke.

    Defeat today the self of yesterday.

    The most important characteristic of Shinkage-ryu is "Attack, Waiting, Front, Back; do not focus on one aspect." (懸待表裏は一隅を守らず ) It indicates not persisting in one thing, but rather flexibly changing form to match one's opponent. In order to do that, it is necessary to keep one's mind in a steady state, influenced by nothing.

    "If your mind is shaken, the body will not move correctly," Koichi explains. "In Shinkage-ryu's kata (seihou), it's not a matter of being good at it or bad at it; it's a matter of being able to do it or not. There's no faking it."

    This is a warning to himself, as well. The previous soke, Nobuharu, passed away in May of this year. He continued his personal research right up until just before his death at age 88, and in the end Koichi could not surpass him.

    "Even though I was named soke, until now I still felt like I was on probation. But with Nobuharu-sensei's passing, little by little my consciousness as soke has grown. I've come to realize the weight of what my predecessors have passed down, and 440 years of history."

    The wall is still high, but what must be done is clear. The mission he's been given is to accurately pass down to later generations the Yagyu techniques and heart.

    "Defeat today the self of yesterday." (昨日の我に今日は勝つべし ) Keeping this family precept in his heart, his days of training will continue.

    ----
    Josh Reyer

    Swa sceal man don, žonne he ęt guše gengan ženceš longsumne lof, na ymb his lif cearaš. - The Beowulf Poet

  11. #26
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    Default

    Thanks for sharing that. I'm going to pass along this to my friend, who recently regaled me with stories of training under Yagyu Koichi sensei while he was at Ken Zen dojo. Great article.
    Mike Melillo

    YSR/Cuong Nhu

  12. #27
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    Default

    Thanks for your effort. Very informative. This year has marked the death of both Yagyu Nobuharu (Shinkage-ryu) and Hoshi Kunio (Shingan-ryu).
    David Kawazu-Barber
    河津バーバー デイビッド
    arakido.org / negishiryu.org

  13. #28
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    Default

    He continued his personal right up until just before his death at age 88, and in the end Koichi could not surpass him.
    I can't edit the original post anymore, but this should be He continued his personal research right up until his death....
    Josh Reyer

    Swa sceal man don, žonne he ęt guše gengan ženceš longsumne lof, na ymb his lif cearaš. - The Beowulf Poet

  14. #29
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Reyer
    I can't edit the original post anymore, but this should be He continued his personal research right up until his death....
    It has been fixed.
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

  15. #30
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    Default clarification of fossils

    Just to clarify this for anyone who stumbles upon this via Koryu.com's link "A note on Yagyu Jubei"

    Munetoshi received licensing from Kamiizumi Ise-no-kami Hidetsuna
    Munenori was the fifth son of Munetoshi.

    I apologize if you were quoting from the book, just clarifying.
    Respectfully,
    Johnathan Pierson

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