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Thread: Anyone see ...?

  1. #31
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    Default Re: It was what it was...

    Originally posted by TommyK In terms of the arts I am not an adherent of the sword, but I found the ability of the good captain 'taking out' trained Ninja and even Samurai unbeliveable after training for a few short months. Despite his experience in both the American War Between the States and the Frontier Campaigns, his calvary saber techniques, would be inferior to the sword of a trained Samurai. This is because both his training time with the sword would be minute compared to the Samurai, and his tactics would be oriented more toward western methods, and his expertise would certainly be more with the pistol.
    I'm no expert here, but I disagree for two reasons.

    1) Battlefield experience counts more than time doing kata. From FAMOUS BUDOKA OF JAPAN: SEKIUN HARIGAYA FOUNDER OF MUJUSHIN KENJUTSU
    by Yoshinori Kono,Aikido Journal #114

    http://www.aikidojournal.com/new/art...?ArticleID=294

    "Bushi during the Sengoku (warring states) period were constantly on the battlefield, and more of them learned their skills through actual combat experience than by learning the hiden or gokui (secrets and inner teachings) of the various styles and traditions as they do today. In any case, during that time of constant fighting, people had precious little time to learn kenjutsu and the like, and even if they did, they very rarely found it of immediate use on the battlefield; most fought simply relying on luck and their own determination to survive."

    There is a study which investigated how long it took to attain MENKYO KAIDEN (license of full transmission of the art) and it found that the time it took was halved for individuals who had been in battle. I'm sorry, but I can't find where I read that.

    2) The invincible samurai is more wishful thinking than history. The Mongols walked all over them, and after a slow beginning, the Koreans gave them a hard time when Hideyoshi invaded. When Britain destroyed a coastal town, their landing parties manhandled the vaunted Bushi sword to sword, too. (Ive read about this in two sources. One is Choshu in the Meiji Restoration by Craig. I think the other source was the historical novel Ryoma by Hillsborough, but Im not sure.)
    Don J. Modesto
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  2. #32
    Bull_in_chinash Guest

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    Originally, the spinning back kick was used by certain Native American tribes to stun buffalo. Native American warriors would prove their bravery by sneaking up on unwitting buffalo and striking hard against the jaw with a spinning back kick.
    LMAO!!!!!

    that was hilarious! the mental image was classic!

    +1 !

  3. #33
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    Yeah. An entering score of 25, the absolute lowest possible for admission, and he gets into the Guard ahead of 100,000 other applicants (during the Vietnam draft.) Ugh.
    Under this analysis, Theodore Roosevelt Jr. should have been President during WWII, since his WWI career was much more distinguished than his cousin's (FDR). Wounded twice, gassed, finished the War as the Col. of 26th Infantry Regiment(Blue Spaders). Life is unfair, don't expect anything associated with it to be fair.

    Cruise's character is what was known in the Old West as a "killing gentleman." The hardest thing to train is the mindset. He obviously had "it" in spades before he went to Japan. There are no dangerous weapons, only dangerous persons.

    Without trying to be a spoiler, does the ending of the movie implicate Hirohito as a war criminal?
    Theodore Roosevelt (really)!

  4. #34
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    Originally posted by Rough Rider
    Without trying to be a spoiler, does the ending of the movie implicate Hirohito as a war criminal?
    Obviously, since this movie takes place in the late 1800s during the reign of the Meiji Emperor, the Showa Emperor isn't even considered.

    What is the real point of your post, Mr. Roosevelt?
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  5. #35
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    Default

    DNFTT
    Earl Hartman

  6. #36
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    YK,
    According to the story, Emporor Meiji had authority to over rule his privy council and was not merely a constitutional monarch. After WWII Hirohito was portrayed as a constitutional monarch without any real power to effect the course of events that led up to Japan's participation in the war, or the conduct of its government and armed forces during the war. That is the only point I was trying to make.

    The dichotomy between the actual and perceived power of the Japanese Emporor is discussed in more detail here . So, to paraphrase the show, was it History or Hollywood?
    Theodore Roosevelt (really)!

  7. #37
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    Default Re: The Spinning Backkick of Doom

    Any doccumentation of this?

    Originally posted by edg176
    Recently documentation has come to light concerning the mysterious origin of the spinning back kick.

    Originally, the spinning back kick was used by certain Native American tribes to stun buffalo. Native American warriors would prove their bravery by sneaking up on unwitting buffalo and striking hard against the jaw with a spinning back kick.

    American soldiers on the frontier, in awe of the mystical and noble Native American warriors learned the spinning back kick technique. American advisors to the early Imperial forces brought the spinning back kick to Japan, where they used the unconventional low-percentage technique to surprise the exponents of several traditional Japanese ryu.

    As the Japanese were (and are) quick to adopt effective foreign practices, several ryy adopted the spinning back kick. However, due to the decisive and devastating effect of the technique, the headmasters chose to teach it only as okuden, which means that only a few, dedicated students could learn it. This explains the lack of documentation (until now) of the koryu spinning back kick. Absensce, as Donald Rumsfeld so eloquently explained, is proof of existence.

    Of course, these students could not reveal their spinning back kick knowledge without dishonoring themselves, which would of course require performance of hara-kiri (known vulgarly as "sepuku"). This unfortunately led to several taryu-jiai victories where the winner (by spinning back kick to the jaw of course) had to commit hara-kiri for revealing the secret technique.

    Eventually, one disciple initiated into the secrets of the spinning back kick made his way to Korea. Although he lost his menkyo kaiden and other documentation at a train station, no one could take away the feared spinning back kick of doom. Today, while the spinning back kick is known as a specialty of the Korean practitioners, its true origin among the Native Americans and journey to Japan has come to light. My teacher told me so, and he is never wrong.

  8. #38
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    Originally posted by Earl Hartman
    DNFTT
    Sorry. I looked this up on three internet acronym sites and I still don't know what it means.

    DNFTT?
    Don J. Modesto
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  9. #39
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    Do Not Feed The Troll
    Earl Hartman

  10. #40
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    Default Re: Re: The Spinning Backkick of Doom

    Originally posted by shinbushi
    Any doccumentation of this?
    Yes. Look it up under "farce" in the "Dictionary of Offbeat Humor."
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  11. #41
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    Default Who is/are "The Last Samurai"?

    Attachment problem. Will try again below.
    Last edited by Brian Owens; 10th December 2003 at 06:36.

  12. #42
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    Default Who is/are "The Last Samurai"?

    Originally posted by burp
    ...Just questioned, since every movie poster or advertisement shows Tom Cruise's face between the large typeprint of "The Last Samurai"...
    I found this for you.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  13. #43
    Troy McClure Guest

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    There's a poster I'll buy. Good photo.

  14. #44
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    Originally posted by Troy McClure
    There's a poster I'll buy. Good photo.
    The original has "TOM CRUISE" written in large type at the top of the poster.

    I airbrushed it out of the image. Sorry if I confused/disappointed anyone.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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