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Thread: Insurance

  1. #1
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    Default Insurance

    Allie,

    What is your advice on dojo insurance? What about personal insurance for you and your employees? Do you use a waiver? I think 99% of the school do, but I have heard that a waiver will never stand up in court if someone gets hurts. Comments?
    John Lindsey

    Oderint, dum metuant-Let them hate, so long as they fear.

  2. #2
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    Dear John;

    Thanks for all the questions I appreciate being able to help.

    Insurance is vital. You must get a good insurance policy. Some of them are very highly priced. I currently am using the Martial arts group out of florida. They are very good. They contract through midland insurance. Right now I am working on a policy from another company that will absolutely blow away any on the market. I will keep people posted.

    I do use a waiver and a contract that has a waiver attached to it. I have never been sued in 12 years. Thank god. I also have a very safe and effective program. Usually, there are no injuries that acquire medical attention.

    I have heard that the waiver doesn't mean anything in court. I think the waiver, the contract and the insurance all go hand in hand. The most important thing is to establish with the people that this is a contact sport. If that is what they realize and realize the risks as well then you as a teacher are a bit safer.

    In spirit;
    Allie Alberigo
    Lininja.com

  3. #3
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    The last time I ran a commercial operation my insurance company required a waiver as a conditon of the policy. I had to send them my waiver, and they actually made changes to it.

    I think the purpose of the waiver is to mitigate the actual payout in the event of claim.
    Kevin(the fluffy bunny)Mathews

  4. #4
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    Allie,

    Any update on the new policy you were working on?

    Chris
    Chris Guzik


    "You can never do a kindness too soon,
    because you never know how soon it will be too late."

    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  5. #5
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    I sort of disapprove about how easy it is to get around signing a waiver. If I went to some martial arts school and figured the odds of my getting injured were too high, I'd simply not study at that school. What's with entering a class and then venomously trying to sue people after the fact?

  6. #6
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    I don't own a school. I'm not even qualified to teach yet, but I'll give my two cents anyway.

    The school I go to uses waivers. I don't really understand why some schools wouldn't use them. I also don't know why people would sue if they did get injured. Mostly becasue I think that if you get injured, it's your fault, not the school's, unless the teacher had a direct effect on your injury.

    Just last week they made a mom sign one because her son was three years old, one year less than the specified age for the class.

    Just as John says, don't let anyone get injured.


    Jon
    Jonathan Wood

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