Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: Shindo Rikugo ryu

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Melissa, TX
    Posts
    3,162
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default Photos: Shinto Rikugo-ryu

    Found these on the net (Japanese Google Search). These are from the book Shinto Rikugo-ryu Jujutsu kyoju sho: Kihon no maki
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    511
    Likes (received)
    3

    Default

    Hi George,

    Those pics are cool!
    Is there anything more on Shinto Rikugo ryu? I think this was the school founded by Noguchi sensei and was more or less meant as a countermeasure against the increasingly popular Kodokan judo of Kano. The school is supposed to have consisted of several older jujutsustyles.

    Best,

    Johan Smits

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Melissa, TX
    Posts
    3,162
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default

    There are some more, but not much. To tell you the truth I don't know too much about Noguchi and Shinto Rikugo-ryu.

    Here is pictures from Tokka Kyoju Sho Tora no maki
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    511
    Likes (received)
    3

    Default

    I think the last pictures are from a book that has been reprinted in the 1980's or 1990's. Serge Mol mentions Noguchi and writes a short piece about the school in his Complete Koryu Jujutsu.

    On freebudo.com I think the school is also mentioned, one of their japanese teachers jujutsu style originates in the Shinto Rikugo-ryu.

    Best,

    Johan Smits

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Melissa, TX
    Posts
    3,162
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johan smits
    I think the last pictures are from a book that has been reprinted in the 1980's or 1990's. Serge Mol mentions Noguchi and writes a short piece about the school in his Complete Koryu Jujutsu.

    On freebudo.com I think the school is also mentioned, one of their japanese teachers jujutsu style originates in the Shinto Rikugo-ryu.

    Best,

    Johan Smits
    What's the name of the book that was reprinted in the 1980's/90's? These pictures came from http://www.bokuden.or.jp/~bunbkan which I think is a research group.

    I have the Serge Mol book and read the small description. I wish there are more about this school.
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    511
    Likes (received)
    3

    Default

    I am at the office right now and do not have the book here but from memory it is titled: Okugi jujutsu kyujo sho. It is mentioned in Serge Mol's Complete Koryu Jujutsu. It is authored by Noguchi sensei and (the reprint) consists of the Tora no maki which are more techniques in kata form and another part which seems to be kihon waza. It might be called Ryu no maki or maybe it consists of another book by Noguchi titled Seitei Kihon Shokai.

    best,

    Johan Smits

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Melissa, TX
    Posts
    3,162
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default Shindo Rikugo ryu

    I posted some picture of this school the clipart archive and wondered if anyone has any info on this school. I know that there is a small piece about this school in Serge Mol's book, but wanted to get more information about this school.

    Who are the Noguchi brothers?
    What did they study?
    What happened to the school?
    Is anyone still teaching this school?

    Now, it might be a rumor, but I heard that the reason why it did not take off like Judo was because one of the Noguchi brothers died at an early age.
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    511
    Likes (received)
    3

    Default

    George,

    I have no inside information but I got it from a good source that a kata called Higo-ryu taijutsu no kata is still practiced in Japan in several dojo.
    I think this kata is from the Shinto Rikugo-ryu.

    best,

    Johan Smits

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Chelsea, London & Souka, Saitama-ken
    Posts
    1,284
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johan smits
    George,

    I have no inside information but I got it from a good source that a kata called Higo-ryu taijutsu no kata is still practiced in Japan in several dojo.
    I think this kata is from the Shinto Rikugo-ryu.

    best,

    Johan Smits
    The Higo-ryu Taijutsu No Kata does not come from Shinto Rokugo-ryu.
    Higo-ryu Taijutsu no kata is an amalgamation of several koryu techniques from, Aida-ryu, Kyushin-ryu,Shi ten-ryu, Takenouchi Santo-ryu, Tenka Muso-ryu and Akiyama Yoshin-ryu.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    511
    Likes (received)
    3

    Default

    Hi Steve,

    Thank you for the information. Do you know where the Higo-ryu taijutsu no kata comes from. Could be Higo-ryu but could you give us some more inforamtion about it's origin and contends?

    In order not to hijack the thread maybe you can tell us also about the Shinto Rikugo-ryu?

    Big please and bigger smiley.

    Johan Smits

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Chelsea, London & Souka, Saitama-ken
    Posts
    1,284
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johan smits
    Hi Steve,

    Thank you for the information. Do you know where the Higo-ryu taijutsu no kata comes from. Could be Higo-ryu but could you give us some more inforamtion about it's origin and contends?
    Historically, Higo-han or Higo No Kuni is the feudal name for what is now modern day Kumamoto prefecture. There are ten kata. It was formalized by the Kumamoto Judo renmei (Most of the higher ranking members at the time being koryu jujutsuka) in order to preserve the older methods of koryu jujutsu.

    In order not to hijack the thread maybe you can tell us also about the Shinto Rikugo-ryu?
    神道六合流 (しんとうろくごうりゅう) Shinto Rokugo-ryu (not Rikugo). I don't know much about this school, other than it's an offshoot of Yoshin-ryu. It's still being taught in Japan as far as I know. Not much more than that.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    511
    Likes (received)
    3

    Default

    One more thing. Some years ago I proposed on this board (and maybe on another one) it woudl be good for the practitioners of modern jujutsu in the West (meaning outside of Japan) if there would be a standard kata for them to practice.
    A kata originating maybe in different schools but then they would have something authentic to train in and learn from.

    The tenure of the messages I got was that it was not possible, blahblahblah, koryu to difficult, blahblahblah and to different, etc, etc.

    And now to my big surprise (and happiness I should add) it seems that such a form does exist.

    Steve, I am going to pm you on this one.

    Best,

    Johan Smits

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Chelsea, London & Souka, Saitama-ken
    Posts
    1,284
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johan smits
    One more thing. Some years ago I proposed on this board (and maybe on another one) it woudl be good for the practitioners of modern jujutsu in the West (meaning outside of Japan) if there would be a standard kata for them to practice.
    A kata originating maybe in different schools but then they would have something authentic to train in and learn from.

    The tenure of the messages I got was that it was not possible, blahblahblah, koryu to difficult, blahblahblah and to different, etc, etc.

    And now to my big surprise (and happiness I should add) it seems that such a form does exist.

    Johan Smits
    Why do you think the Kodokan Kime no Kata was formed? Same thing mate - it preserves the older jujutsu methods. If you add on to that the Kodokan Goshinjutsu, you have oodles of fun!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    511
    Likes (received)
    3

    Default

    Steve,

    You are correct of course and we did oodle for a long time but in a strange way this is (for me at least) connected to a very old discussion about the "identity (and lack thereoff) of Westernized jujutsu".

    Both kata, kime no kata and Goshinjutsu are official judo kata. For jujutsu it would be good if the art would separate from judo organisations. But that is my idea and it is a very different story altogether.

    best,

    Johan Smits

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Chelsea, London & Souka, Saitama-ken
    Posts
    1,284
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johan smits
    Steve,

    You are correct of course and we did oodle for a long time but in a strange way this is (for me at least) connected to a very old discussion about the "identity (and lack thereoff) of Westernized jujutsu".
    So taking a kata from yet another judo source is going to give it character? (Higo-ryu Taijutsu No Kata is a kata for judoka in Kumamoto so that they can learn the geographical cultural roots of judo in their prefecture).

    No, I don't think so.

    Both kata, kime no kata and Goshinjutsu are official judo kata. For jujutsu it would be good if the art would separate from judo organisations. But that is my idea and it is a very different story altogether.

    best,

    Johan Smits
    Well the Higo-ryu Taijutsu No kata is also a judo related kata. You can't seperate the two that easily.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •