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Thread: Is Kenjutsu a Sword Art in Itself?

  1. #106
    Dan Harden Guest

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    Posted on the wrong thread sorry
    reposted on Koryu and stagnancy
    Dan

    [Edited by Dan Harden on 12-26-2000 at 11:37 AM]

  2. #107
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    Unhappy My Give Up!

    Oy. You and I just aren't connecting on the same wavelength, Mr. Beaird. I haven't changed my "arguement" in the least, but obviously I am failing to adequately communicate my thoughts. Best to just let this discussion die a natural death.

    Originally posted by dbeaird
    Originally posted by Cady Goldfield
    I'm not sure how "terrorizing" students and teachers breaking students' arms got into the picture here. Training accidents happen when engaging in intense contact. Any teacher who breaks a student's limb or causes injury out of carelessness -- or who allows it to happen at the hands of another student during his watch -- is guilty of using poor judgement and of being irresponsible. There is no room for that in martial arts training.cg
    Here, let me refresh your memory:

    Originally posted by Cady Goldfield

    Even so, in kenjutsu, every one of us in our dojo has had broken fingers (I've had at least 1 digit of every finger fractured or broken at some time), wounds in the face and throat during *controled/limited target* full-intensity shiai (and that's with armor and bamboo shinai), deep contusions and the like. In jujutsu, I've had several concussions, a broken leg, deep contusions and a detached retina. Even my instructor, who is built like a tank, has gotten fractures and broken bones, not to mention knocked out. And that's when we were going "relatively easy. Likewise, in my former P/K life, our hard-contact (yet controled) training provided me with a long list of injuries, from dislocated shoulders and jaws to concussions, broken bonens, muscles and tendons ripped from the bones, and loads of huge, deep bruises.
    Cady, I can't have a reasonable discussion/argument or whatever you want to call it with someone who won't address the points I've made or who changes their arguments faster than Hershey's puts out those little foil kisses.

    By your own definition, your instructors use poor judgement and are irresponsible. How authentic is that? (I hope you see the point I'm trying to make here.)

    I could at this point make a comment about how angry those kenjutsu people seem to get...I'll let the thought stand for the deed.

    I'll leave you with my favorite piece of Zen advice:

    Go and have a cup of tea.

    Merry Christmas

    Cady Goldfield

  3. #108
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    Default Re: Real kenjutsu training and iaido seniors commenting

    Originally posted by Kim Taylor
    Getting rather interested in the idea of training with the intent to kill without actually killing, sort of reminds me of when I was 17 and used to say to the girls "let's go all the way but we won't get you pregnant OK?"and so will the other sissy seitei senseis.
    Lest there be further confusion on the concept of "intent to kill," let's just call it "method acting," okay? It's harnessed aggression and nothing more. It is not a personal focus that says "I will kill YOU." Rather, it is more of a "I wanna cut THAT." But you don't.

    Does that make it any clearer?

    cg
    Cady Goldfield

  4. #109
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    Smile

    Late reply to this thread that I am just catching up on after the holidays. I have to say that it was quite an interesting discussion and pushed quite a few buttons on various people. It even got Mr. Taylor to sign up and post! I just feel that I have to put an opinion forth to everyone that has been following this. The sword arts are no longer a valid combat effective technique. If you want combat effectivness, most of your training should be with firearms. Swords are a quaint and outdated notion, therefore anyone who practices sword is only 'dancing with a sharp object' because it is training that will never be put to use. The only objectives of sword training are personal fulfillment.
    Just had to throw my 2 yen into the pot!


    Cheers!
    Paul Smith
    "Always keep the sharp side and the pointy end between you and your opponent"

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