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Thread: Questions on Hakko-ryu

  1. #16
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    Hi Graham,

    The primary instruction in Hakkoryu is in the formal Kata. This is how the art is passed on and what we put ourselves up against in our attempt to master the teachings of the ryu.

    Yet, there are other dimensions in Hakkoryu training which can vary from dojo to dojo. Many Hakkoryu schools practice what we call "henka" or variations of the techniques shown in the foundational kata.

    The Hakkoryu.com website states:

    As with all Japanese bugei/budo Kata, they may be considered “ideal models for teaching.” In Hakkoryu, their purpose is to clearly teach our principles (Gensoku), not to provide the best solution for any given self-defense situation. Once the Kata are mastered and our principles understood, they may be adapted for use in myriad practical situations. Such variations from Kihon Waza we call “Henka.”
    It is through this process of extracting and internalizing the principles and themes contained within the individual techniques and then applying them to a variety of situations that we might create "thousands of techniques".

    In regards to your second question, yes, the student begins by learning the techniques and principles of the Shodan kata, and only when they have shown the required competence and understanding of those teachings are they introduced to the Nidan waza.
    John Cole

  2. #17
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    Default Waza & Henka

    GCP,

    John Cole has provided a very good explanation. The Shodan waza are as John described, which are ideal situations illustrating a principle. As Hombu does not acknowledge any level below Shodan, the individual teacher devises kyu levels to progressively advance the student. At each kyu level, and depending on the teacher, you will be introduced to the Shodan waza, and henka of specific waza along the way. This allows you to apply a practical component to your training. So, in the instance of one waza / principle, you may learn a variety of applications, reversals, and counters to reversals. In other words, the henka (variations) can be many, and completely dependent on the practitioner. It is worthy to note that to know one technique well is better than to know 200 with average competence. Since taking up Hakkoryu in the manner and method I have been taught, I am forced to learn or be hurt (not permanently!), as well, I am forced to think about what I am doing in that moment, and every day that I practice on my own. Hakkoryu is not presented like many other arts, and is rarely afforded the respect it deserves as a practical self defense. What I enjoy about the art is you must be able to equally take what you dish out, otherwise you cannot learn. You are forced to think about the art and how you apply it, and you are not barred from advancing to the completion of all its studies (unlike many other arts that purposely keep practitioners from advancing in rank). If you are really interested in Hakkoryu, try to look up as many articles written by Brian Workman, and read extensively about legitimate traditional practitioners/ historians like Donn F Draeger. Another good book to read (with a grain of salt) is "Transparent Power", which provides a great insight into the early years of Daito-ryu, the parent art of Hakkoryu. There are many other aspects to learning Hakkoryu, but I don't think anyone can do it justice simply by writing, or posting it on Youtube. On the surface, Hakkoryu is about pain, but that is only the tip of the iceberg.

  3. #18
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    Thanks for the info. To clarify, I have studied Hakko ryu kata, but via the Dentokan organisation, though my teacher was trained by Antonio Garcia in Belgium. The problem being that I am now several steps removed from the hombu, so it is hard to tell which are actual aspects of Hakkoryu, and whicha re bits added in. The information has been useful.

    As it turns out, I am going to Live in Tokyo in April, so I'm thinking of going to train in Irie sensei's Kokodo ryu. I also train in Takeuchi ryu, which is why in one of my earlier posts in this thread I was asking about the potential links.
    ____________________________
    Graham Pluck

  4. #19
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    Is any of the hakko ryu in the UK please

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seaham kempo View Post
    Is any of the hakko ryu in the UK please
    Hi Paul,

    Feel free to contact Mr. Lloyd Allum in Ipswich. See https://www.hakkoryukotokukandojo.or...rm-membership/.

    Devon

  6. #21
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    Mar 2002
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    Lloyd's a good guy and affiliated with the Hakko Ryu so if you're close to Ipswich he's well worth training with. Elsewhere in the country there's a few clubs derived from Hakko Ryu, but no longer affiliated. If you're around Oxfordshire feel free to get in contact with me: www.jujutsu.org.uk

    Giles

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