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Thread: Japanese For Sitting

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    Default Japanese For Sitting

    My google fu is weak at this time,

    Seiza is Kneeling position, and as I undertand "Zazen" is Sitting meditation, what would term used when just sitting in the same position but not meditating ?

    Thanks in Advance !
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    As far as my bad japanese goes, "suwaru" is to sit, and here's an example I think I remember correctly: Dozo suwatte kudasai - Please sit down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prince Loeffler
    My google fu is weak at this time,

    Seiza is Kneeling position, and as I undertand "Zazen" is Sitting meditation, what would term used when just sitting in the same position but not meditating ?

    Thanks in Advance !
    "I (he/she/it is) am sitting" would be "Suatte iru."
    Don J. Modesto
    Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    ------------------------
    http://theaikidodojo.com/

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    Thanks guys ! I was looking somedown like " Sit" as Be in "sitting" position.
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prince Loeffler
    ..."sitting" position.
    "Agura" may be what you're looking for.

    It refers to the cross-legged way of sitting on the floor. It's considered acceptable for men in informal situations, when seiza isn't required. Women can sit in a seiza-like position but with feet to the side instead of under them; I don't know what that position is called.

    HTH.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    The position when sitting as when you meditate is called hankafuza:
    半跏趺坐 [はんかふざ] (n) (sitting in) the half lotus position (in Zen meditation)

    Is that what you are looking for?

    /Anders
    Anders Pettersson
    www.shorinjikempo.net - www.shorinjikempo.se
    半ばは自己の幸せを、半ばは他人の幸せを - 宗 道臣
    "Nakaba wa jiko no shiawase wo, nakaba wa hito no shiawase wo" - So Doshin

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    I concur with Brian. I think Prince is looking for agura 胡坐.
    Josh Reyer

    Swa sceal man don, žonne he ęt guše gengan ženceš longsumne lof, na ymb his lif cearaš. - The Beowulf Poet

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    Special Thanks to Anders, I think Brian and John hits the nail right on the head. Jeez, I never how hard it was to look for basic translation. Thanks gentlemen !
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    Just to further muddy the waters:

    Sitting techniques in Budo are called suwariwaza, and when my sensei wanted us to sit down he would just say -- in the rather blunt way common in many dojo -- "suwarimas(u)."

    Anders mentioned the half lotus posture, hankafuza. It would follow then, that the full lotus posture is kafuza.

    Confusing, ne?
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Owens
    Just to further muddy the waters:

    Sitting techniques in Budo are called suwariwaza, and when my sensei wanted us to sit down he would just say -- in the rather blunt way common in many dojo -- "suwarimas(u)."

    Anders mentioned the half lotus posture, hankafuza. It would follow then, that the full lotus posture is kafuza.

    Confusing, ne?
    Ok ? Oh Jeez ! BTW Brian, I am using my forehead to type this repsonse
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    Smile Sitting

    To add some more things about sitting in Japanese and Budo.

    In Shorinjikempo we use idori [居捕] is a part of the name of each hōkei 法形 (pair form technique), that is done from a sitting position.

    As a command from instructor to students to sit we use chakuza [着座], we then start by sitting in seiza [正座], if going to sit for a longer period the instructor usually say anza [安座] and you can sit more comfotable with your legs crossed.

    /Anders
    Anders Pettersson
    www.shorinjikempo.net - www.shorinjikempo.se
    半ばは自己の幸せを、半ばは他人の幸せを - 宗 道臣
    "Nakaba wa jiko no shiawase wo, nakaba wa hito no shiawase wo" - So Doshin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anders Pettersson
    if going to sit for a longer period the instructor usually say anza [安座] and you can sit more comfotable with your legs crossed.

    /Anders
    This was pretty much what I was looking for. But how is "Anza" different from "Agura" ?

    BTW, I did ask some of my Japanese friends and they didn't know. ~sigh~
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Owens
    Sitting techniques in Budo are called suwariwaza,
    I've also heard people say that zagi. Same kanji, but onyomi instead of kunyomi.
    when my sensei wanted us to sit down he would just say -- in the rather blunt way common in many dojo -- "suwarimas(u)."
    My Japanese isn't stellar, but that sounds odd to me. He doesn't say "suwatte" (a "request") or "suware" (a command)? "Suwarimasu" seems more descriptive than imperative to me. And it's not blunt; -masu is the plain polite form of a verb.
    Kent Enfield
    Kentokuseisei

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prince Loeffler
    This was pretty much what I was looking for. But how is "Anza" different from "Agura" ?

    BTW, I did ask some of my Japanese friends and they didn't know. ~sigh~
    How is "sit cross-legged" different from "sit Indian-style"?

    when my sensei wanted us to sit down he would just say -- in the rather blunt way common in many dojo -- "suwarimas(u)."
    My Japanese isn't stellar, but that sounds odd to me. He doesn't say "suwatte" (a "request") or "suware" (a command)? "Suwarimasu" seems more descriptive than imperative to me. And it's not blunt; -masu is the plain polite form of a verb.
    Actually, in a certain context "suwarimasu" can be basic command. An instructor saying "suwatte" or "suware" can be simply telling his students to sit, while he will remain standing. "Suwarou" or "Suwarimashou" would be "Let's sit down", and would be fine, though a bit friendly and casual. But if the instructor is intending that everybody (including him) will sit down, then he may simply say "Suwarimasu", meaning "We will sit down now." Given the unequivocable nature of the statement, the sense is certainly blunter then the more typical "Suwarimashou".
    Josh Reyer

    Swa sceal man don, žonne he ęt guše gengan ženceš longsumne lof, na ymb his lif cearaš. - The Beowulf Poet

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    Quote Originally Posted by Enfield
    ..."Suwarimasu" seems more descriptive than imperative to me. And it's not blunt; -masu is the plain polite form of a verb.
    I don't speak the language, so I can't really say. Josh seemed to cover it well. I would say, though, that it's more blunt than "Dozo suwatte kudasai."
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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