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Thread: Is this normal?

  1. #16
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    So it seems my temperature should decrease, while actually it's increasing when I do meditate. Any light on this?

    Thanks.
    Alejandro Villanueva.


  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Owens
    I have assisted others during meditation, and even wrote a short paper on the topic..
    This is the Jesus said line of argument. I recognize it. One tends to take a direct line to some source deemed an infallible authority, as if one should be struck down should he dare question its claim on fact.

    Regardless, when YOU have experienced and transcended the full range of symptoms indicating deepening concentration -- ALL the makyo from mild sensory disturbances to monsterous panic attacks and sudden and unexplainable fears of death, then you may claim authority and assist others. Essays do not an expert make. Grant yourself firsthand knowledge through complete and total experience, then advise. It's only fair to the topic creator, who by all indications has experienced a mild makyo. Once again, anything else represents a potential risk for him.

    Of course, if I am greatly mistaken in assuming you have not experienced deep makyo, then by all means strike what I've said and continue advising. Probability is on my side, however. The vast majority have neither experienced makyo. Fewer have even completely endured them. This makes most people unfit to advise in situations like this.

    Frankly I feel there's nothing more that needs to be said on the matter. Do whatever your heart directs you to do.

    Michael Hodge

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Hodge
    Regardless, when YOU have experienced and transcended the full range of symptoms indicating deepening concentration -- ALL the makyo from mild sensory disturbances to monsterous panic attacks and sudden and unexplainable fears of death, then you may claim authority and assist others. Essays do not an expert make. Grant yourself firsthand knowledge through complete and total experience, then advise. It's only fair to the topic creator, who by all indications has experienced a mild makyo. Once again, anything else represents a potential risk for him.
    Michael, if I recall correctly Brian's advice was along the lines of "if you feel cold, it could just be your body cooling down after a workout; try turning up the heat." If the original poster really is just experiencing a normal cooling of body temperatures, then Brian's advice (and the advice of Jim, who recommended a blanket) is spot-on. If the original poster is experiencing makyo, then Brian's advice will probably not help. I think that someone on this forum saying, "try using a blanket or turning up the heat," is harmless; if the problem persists, the original poster will know to look elsewhere for advice.
    David Sims

    "Cuius testiculos habes, habeas cardia et cerebellum." - Terry Pratchet

    My opinion is, in all likelihood, worth exactly what you are paying for it.

  4. #19
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    Allejandro:

    There is no "should" regarding particular bodily sensations during meditation. The sensation of rising body temperature, feeling warmer, is common, though not universal. If it is not interfering with your meditation I would not be concerned about it. If you meditate long enough this will pass, to be replaced by some other kinds of bodily sensation. As always, if this is a problem, talk to your teacher about it.

    Michael:

    I agree that the internet is not the best way to acquire information about the meditative process. The first choice is always first hand instruction from a qualified meditator, meaning someone who has meditated regularly for ten years or more. On the other hand, the internet does offer the possibility of accessing a scope of experience that might not be available in one's local dojo; this can be an advantage.

    It is difficult to know on the basis of a single internet posting whether someone is experiencing makyo or actual bodily sensations. I take a very practical approach to questions along these lines and assume that they are simple bodily sensations unless there is reason to infer otherwise. It is kind of my default approach. In most cases there are very simple remedies to obstacles in meditation such as shifting one's posture, slight changes in environmental setting, changes in clothing which might be restricting circulation, etc.

    Best wishes,

    Jim Wilson
    Dharmajim

  5. #20
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    Thumbs up

    Thank you, Jim. Actually it's not really interfering with my meditation, it's only that it's annoying how in cold weather you can feel hot, even sweating your gi, by "doing nothing."
    Alejandro Villanueva.


  6. #21
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    I know this is an old post, and I'm not sure what makyo is, but I am pretty sure someone was the first to discover it and they managed on their own somehow or how else would we know about it? I think it can be taken lightly on this fact alone.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig Justice View Post
    ...I'm not sure what makyo is...
    Makyo -- 魔境 -- is a Japanese term used by Zen Buddhists to describe sensory disturbances that some people experience during prolonged Zen meditation.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Owens View Post
    Makyo -- 魔境 -- is a Japanese term used by Zen Buddhists to describe sensory disturbances that some people experience during prolonged Zen meditation.
    I don't know if this will help the discussion as it seems to be carrying many overtones. What I can add, though, is that various sensations while sitting are often reported during SESSHIN at the monastery to which I belong. The reports are usually from folks from outside of the monastery and are usually a function of the intense and regular practice. Some of the feelings are those of heat or cold, while others may be itching, buzzing, vertigo, intrusive thoughts and strong bursts of emotion. What I find most helpful and what many are guided to do is not to attach any particular meaning or importance to these senations. Unless one has a known health issue, most of these events are the mind and body responding to being asked to do something that they would not ordinarily be doing. Much later in practice, some folks actually introduce challenges to their meditation by performing their practice under circumstances where there is strong intrusion through the sensory system such as meditating in cold water, in an insect-infested location, where there are intermittant loud noises and so forth. FWIW.

    Best Wishes,

    Bruce
    Bruce W Sims
    www.midwesthapkido.com

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by glad2bhere View Post
    ...What I find most helpful and what many are guided to do is not to attach any particular meaning or importance to these senations.
    I agree.

    The mountain, though touched by the clouds, is not moved by them.

    I'll also add that if what one is disturbed by is more than an annoyance...more than mild unusual sensations...then it might be well to see a doctor -- either medical or psychological, as indicated by the circumstances.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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