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Thread: Martial Arts from my perspective.

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    Default Martial Arts from my perspective.

    Gentlemen,

    Please excuse my delay in replying to the thread that was on this forum. I was heavily tasked in Japan and behind on a number of things when I returned CONUS on Sunday.

    It appears that my view of martial arts is from a very different perspective than some on this forum. I study Samurai bujutsu as an art of war. Training in the sword is the foundation of this training and I train with the sword, with the full intention of prevailing in an edged weapon engagement. This is a classical perspective. As kenjutsu is the omote so then is jujutsu the ura. As this is the case all empty hand and small weapon techniques are done exactly the same way as the kenjutsu. Striking, locking, throwing, even strangulation techniques come directly from kenjutsu and this is easily recognized when observing the technique. I do not believe, and have not seen demonstrated by anyone, that it is possible to study Samurai bujutsu from a different perspective and fully understand and make practically functional the Samurai military arts that they evolved over centuries.

    The mindset of martial arts in Japan has changed a great deal from those of their Samurai ancestors. This change in mindset and technique is readily visible, with a few notable exceptions, in modern Japanese dojo. This change of mindset and technique is even expressed in the Japanese constitution.

    Mars was the God of war. The Martial Arts were originally arts of War. This is not the case in 99% of what is now called "Martial arts". War is about killing people and breaking things, art is the ability to do this to your opponent without having them do that to you. We use the broad term Martial arts for a number of different practices that have some relationship to what were once arts studied for War. Self Defense, sport based competition, controlled environment sport fighting (UFC etc.), exercise and esoteric practice all make up what we call Martial Arts today. These are obviously very different practices and take a different set of skills and mindset. There is some crossover however none of these are arts of War.

    Most marital arts still have some method for gaining actual physical competency. This involves some physical contesting at the very least. To think that you could challenge or disparage someone's art or ability and then become self-righteous about proving your ability in some form or another is a relatively recent phenomenon and has gained a large following on the internet. For lack of a better term when referring to those who study what we call Japanese Sword Arts we could deem these Cyber Samurai. They are willing to engage in words written in cyber space but not willing to prove any real knowledge and ability. In martial arts ability is knowledge. If you can't do it you don't know it. This is not the Debate Team at your local high school.

    I notice that there is a bit of a following from what we call Brazilian Jujutsu on this forum. I have known the Gracie's since the 1980's when no one knew who they were. Rorion Gracie's method of convincing people that his art worked was to get on the mat and go at it. There was a bit of pain involved and depending upon your self-view perhaps some embarrassment. However if you really want to know what you can do you have to do it. In the early days there where any number of dojo encounters of various degrees of force applied as there is only one way to truly prove your art and ability. I cannot count the number of times over my almost 5 decades in the Marital Arts where I have proved my ability or at times was shown that perhaps there was more for me to learn. These lessons given or learned came with some degree or another of physical pain and sometimes injury. I do not understand the current mindset that when a person would be asked to prove their ability by some method or another when calling someone's honor into question they respond with indignation and avoid any real demonstration of their ability. Perhaps it is that if you do not have honor, and therefore the potential for shame, that you just don't understand that you are a Cyber Samurai. Your ability to post, quote, or feel self righteous gives you the feeling that you have a "right" to express your opinion with no consequence. This of course removes the foundations of courtesy and respect. It becomes about how you “feel”.

    When the real world hits you the training and mindset that you get in your dojo and the internet will not have prepared you for how fast and ugly things can go sideways. When you are in a dark alley late at night, and you feel the bite and burn of sharp steel on your body you realize that you could die in this place it had better fire your blood as the sharp piece of steel in your hand, and it's immediate and violent use, may be the only thing that gets you home. This is not your warm fuzzy dojo, or in a protected and controlled environment like UFC. There will be no tapping out here and right and wrong will be very clearly defined.

    In the Western world especially there are a majority of people who are protected by our Samurai, those who serve. These warriors still have the need to study arts of War. I am honored to work with a number of our Special Operations units in just this type of endeavor. The responsibility that comes with teaching men of this caliber, ability, and mission is immense. People may live or die with what you teach them. If you have seen men die violently. If you have buried fallen comrades, if you have delivered the message of their death to their loved ones after they have been killed in combat action, and had to tell them how the Secretary of the Army wishes to express his regrets, you know what an enormous responsibility this teaching is. Nothing in your life is so satisfying as having someone that you trained return from battle and tell you that something that you taught them saved their life or the life of one of their comrades in arms. I have sons, I know the look on a parents face when they are told, by me, that their son will not be returning to them. I do not want someone to have to tell the wife, or parents of someone I trained about the Secretary of the Army's regrets.

    What this means for me is that everything I do, know, study, and train for must be the best and most functional strategy, mindset, and technique that it can possibly be. Nothing can be 'made up", you have to know it will work and the best thing is to have personal knowledge that it will in fact work and work better than your enemies. To think that the vast storehouse of knowledge that our ancestors gained from warrior societies is no longer viable in modern combat is a big mistake. Samurai warrior culture has an enormous number of hidden treasures that are valuable in the modern warfare environment. I have gotten extremely positive AARs from my guys who have used this strategy and techniques in battle.

    I have either a sword or a gun in my hand most days. My primary job is training and teaching Martial Arts. I use the knowledge and techniques that I have learned from classical Samurai bujutsu when teaching Close Quarters Battle. I have been extremely fortunate in having some exceptional teachers including Kuroda Tetsuzan, with whom I currently train, who is a truly phenomenal swordsman. If you want to know what Nami ryu is and what it's roots are you can go to my Nami ryu website and read about it. It is public knowledge and demonstrated in public forums many times every year. If you attend the Atlanta Blade show, or other demo's, you will be able to ask questions and see specific techniques or solutions. There is no false or hidden agenda and our dojo is always open. If you wish to visit and observe, you are welcome.

    If anyone has specific questions please feel free to ask. I cannot or will not answer everything, specific units trained, or some of the things that I have done however most questions I will happily answer.

    Much of this was composed in my mind late at night at the Sensoji after it was closed. I was sitting in the dark reflecting on many things including the contrast between this old temple and the surrounding city. It reflects in many ways the change and contrast in the Japanese mindset and martial arts as well. I have a great respect for the ancient ways and methods of the Samurai. They are however not at all common here even in dojo teaching JSA. There are some magnificent exceptions however in my experience they are not popular or common. My personal opinion is that the interest of gaijin has actually brought attention to some of these arts by the Japanese who are beginning to realize the value of some of their historical treasures.

    Sincerely,

    James Williams
    James Willliams
    Kaicho
    Nami ryu

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    Excellent post.

    While I do not have the kind of pedigree in my training history that you have, the substance of your post hits home for me. I do my best to pressure test everything I practice and not to pass along anything that I am not willing to 'throw down' with. Understand that I claim no great level of skill in any area, but I hope to continue to improve by following this type of path, although I consider myself more a Budo practitioner as my hands-on knowledge of traditional Bujutsu is minimal at best.

    Also its nice to see that some folks on this forum share my opinion of 'keyboard warriors'. I remember being told numerous times as a kid growing up that if you wanted to run your mouth off without the ability to back it up, you had better be able to run your ass off. Again, I am no-uber tough guy, and indeed avoid conflict whenever possible, but if I call someone out(which isn't something I do generally), I am already prepared to back up my comments.

    If people want to say it goes against Budo spirit to stand up for yourself and call people who run you down on the mats for doing so, then I will happily pursue my 赤首武道 (as stated by a previous poster).

    Mr.Williams, hats off to you.
    Sincerely,
    Greg Carson

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    Mr. Williams, thank you for your service to the US Military.

    I have a few questions for you. How do you integrate sword work into effective combatives training?

    What part of kenjutsu training does shimewaza originate from?

    What are your qualifications/mandate to teach close quarter battle to military personnel?

    How did you pressure-test the techniques and principles prior to teaching military personnel bound for a combat zone?

    Do you have any of the AARs in writing that you refer to in your post? I would be very interested in reading those.

    Just so you understand my motivation for asking these questions, I am Active Duty, and a certified Modern Army Combatives Program Instructor (in addition to being a classical/gendai martial arts instructor and a long-time student of BJJ). I too have prepared many troops for combat, and have received a pethora of positive feedback (there are some great AARs on the CALL website). My questions are driven by curiosity, and also by my intense desire to improve training to enhance the effectiveness and survivability of my troops.

    My background with personal combat, i.e. "field-testing" and "pressure testing" techniques, outside of martial arts training, is through my experience as a high-risk security operative/consultant for 18 years now - with hundreds of "hands-on" engagements under my belt - including bladed weapons and firearms. (Again, I feel that it is important that you know a bit about my background so you understand why I am asking these questions.)

    Jeff Cook
    Last edited by Jeff Cook; 8th December 2007 at 10:57. Reason: Correcting my spelling

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    "If people want to say it goes against Budo spirit to stand up for yourself and call people who run you down on the mats for doing so, then I will happily pursue my 赤首武道 (as stated by a previous poster)."

    I HIGHLY recommend we don't go there again. That thread was locked, and Mr. Williams has opened a topic with a non-confrontational tone (as opposed to the tone of the locked thread). He does not want to answer the questions posed to him. That is his right. Antagonizing the people who asked those questions here is counterproductive. The insinuations in yours and Mr. Williams post can be seen as being critical of the people who asked questions in another thread. Unless you guys want to go back into that messy realm and invite the same criticism, and still not deliver any answers to those questions, then I suggest this stays on-topic with no reference to what happened before.

    Jeff Cook

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    Mr. Williams, you speak of the “arts of war” as though you are very familiar with them and in fact seem to consider yourself an expert in them. All well and good but I’m not sure you fully understand the concept of “modern” warfare. Modern warfare is much more complex than it was in ancient Japan. Having spent a good deal of my life studying, repairing and maintaining many types of electronic warfare and countermeasures equipment I would suggest that you are focusing on a very limited aspect of modern martial arts. It might even be that what you are studying is a very insignificant aspect of modern warfare. In all likelihood, before you arrive on the scene with your sword and gun, the “cyber warriors” would have already tracked your every movement from start to finish. They may also have “taken you out” anywhere in between with a myriad of modern weapons that you would probably not see or hear until it was too late. You’re right, this not the Debate Team at our local high school; this is modern warfare.
    On a side note; if all it takes to get you to visit my little dojo in the middle of nowhere is for me to issue a challenge, then I have a challenge for you. Teach me what you know. My dojo is always open to you. I would love to learn from you.
    Sincerely,
    Ricky Wood

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    A short note for those responing: If you want to invite someone to play at your house, that's all fine and dandy, but I am warning you now that if this is what you want to do, please do so off board or in PM. Share what you want here, that is what "here" is for. Anything else should be written and reread to make sure it is what you would expect from others. You also have tools which will leave you blind as to what a poster says if you don't like his/her words in general. This thread will be watched closely.

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    Well what is there to say? Only that you got me dizzy with all your combat and Samurai honor and proving your skills and training to attack and defend etc…

    If you want to be in the military business of training troops, police, paramilitary or civilians for modern combat and warfare by all means. My opinion is that this is useless and only brings more violence and hate but hey everybody has different opinions and this is not my main point.

    My main point is that you are mixing koryu bujutsu well the one that you made up with modern warfare and your whole discourse is just a mix up of your own delusions about what Traditional martial arts and ways are and how you think they fit with modern warfare and the fact the you seem to need to prove your ability to use swords etc. this is just pointless and shows you really have only surface knowledge regardless of all the supposed knowledge you want to claim.

    Modern warfare has nothing to do with samurais and the bushido and whatever fantasies you are having about the 47 ronins and falling sakura flowers.

    In Japan the 47 ronins are a 50%/50% deal some people who are seen as some Japanese rednecks will venerate them and other will see them as fools that were just applying a blind revenge that would go nowhere. If truly they were into honoring their Daimyo they would have worked hard with all the means they had to be good citizens and raise their family and not go out on a planned vendetta leaving their wife and kids. If you think being a Bushi/Samurai is about revenge combat etc.. and balls and cheap taste Honor like in most Chanbara movie you are sadly mistaken since it is much more complicated than what you think since all you seem to see as the real thing is a romanticized vision of what Samurai culture is not and never really was.

    Now I am going to take this to another level and would like to get the input of some other American citizen. Why is it that Mr. Williams discourse is all intermixed with combat war defending our country all with samurai honor etc. I have never heard of such a thing here in Canada and have never seen this type of bad taste. Why is it that we seem to see this kind of crap Budo mixed with patriotism mostly in the U.S only or are those people just a small very vocal and visible minority please tell me it is so.
    Sebastien Cyr 義真
    春風館道場
    Shunpukan Dojo

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    THREAD DRIFT ALERT

    Quote Originally Posted by roninseb View Post
    In Japan the 47 ronins are a 50%/50% deal some people who are seen as some Japanese rednecks will venerate them and other will see them as fools that were just applying a blind revenge that would go nowhere. If truly they were into honoring their Daimyo they would have worked hard with all the means they had to be good citizens and raise their family and not go out on a planned vendetta leaving their wife and kids.
    I would disagree with a basic premise that 50% of the Japanese have a positive view of the Ako Roshi and 50% have a negative view of it, let alone the idea that any Japanese person with a modicrum of information on the subject believes they should have just been "good citizens, and worked hard for their families". In fact, that sounds a lot like the point of a view of a western person who doesn't know a lot of the background.

    "Kataki-uchi" or "ada-uchi" was a perfectly legal and accepted practice through much of the medieval period, even having bureaucratic procedures to be followed. The practice had only been recently banned in the Edo period when the Ako incident took place. The prevailing law of that time was kenka ryouseibai - equal fault in the case of any kind of altercation. However, after Asano (Lord of Ako) attacked Kira, Kira received no punishment, and Asano was given the unprecedently harsh punishment of seppuku on that very dayand the dissolution of his house and clan. This is what motivated the Ako Roshi. The first could be withstood, and perhaps only a few, aged, top retainers might commit junshi in protest. But the second meant that all of his retainers, hundreds of them, were out of work. Asano's relatives and remaining top retainers (like Oishi) attempted to get the house and clan restored. In the stories it's often suggested that the ronin waited a year in order to catch Kira by surprise, but the truth was that it was during this year that they attempted to restore the Ako clan by conventional means. However, these hopes were dashed when Asano's brother, Daigaku, was placed in confinement as part of the punishment.

    The goal of the kataki-uchi was to protest the unfairly harsh penalty imposed on the Asano clan, and to restore the house and clan so that the out of work samurai could be be good citizens, and work for their families. And the roshi were very proper about how they did things, turning themselves in afterwards, so that their actions would be recognized for the protest it was, and not mere revenge. And this is why the 47 ronin have been largely admired through history, including today. Not because they killed the guy who killed their lord, but because they did it and sacrificed their lives for the good of the entire Ako-han.

    And it worked. Daigaku was eventually pardoned, and the house and clan was restored, if a bit smaller than it was at its height. That's the thing about Sengoku and early Edo bushi and their "bushido". It was never about "honor" or "death", or even necessarily "loyalty". It was about getting something accomplished.

    Now I am going to take this to another level and would like to get the input of some other American citizen. Why is it that Mr. Williams discourse is all intermixed with combat war defending our country all with samurai honor etc. I have never heard of such a thing here in Canada and have never seen this type of bad taste. Why is it that we seem to see this kind of crap Budo mixed with patriotism mostly in the U.S only or are those people just a small very vocal and visible minority please tell me it is so.
    I would not presume to speak for Mr. Williams. But I imagine that if you see a high degree of patriotism among American martial artists, it is probably because a good many have spent time in the U.S. military and/or have ties there. There are also many in law enforcement. I see it less as bad taste and more as attempting to find a viable and useful outlet for their martial studies.
    Josh Reyer

    Swa sceal man don, ţonne he ćt guđe gengan ţenceđ longsumne lof, na ymb his lif cearađ. - The Beowulf Poet

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    Default Thread Drift Alert From You.

    I guess you are just not seeing my point in the way it was intended. So the thread drift alert is actually mostly YOUR contribution.

    My intention was to show that Mr. Williams has a very romanticized vision of Japanese martial ways and since he had concluded his post with the fact he wrote this while he was at the Sensoji.

    And making a reference to the Ako Roshi was I guess well timed. All the points you are writing on are all true nice fine and dandy. But the fact remains that many Japanese are ambivalent when it comes to the 47 Ronin and revenge seppuku etc. From what I have witnessed you have mainly 2 camps the all Tenno heika Banzai we are Samurai type and the others who support my point.

    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Reyer View Post
    THREAD DRIFT ALERT



    I would disagree with a basic premise that 50% of the Japanese have a positive view of the Ako Roshi and 50% have a negative view of it, let alone the idea that any Japanese person with a modicrum of information on the subject believes they should have just been "good citizens, and worked hard for their families". In fact, that sounds a lot like the point of a view of a western person who doesn't know a lot of the background.

    "Kataki-uchi" or "ada-uchi" was a perfectly legal and accepted practice through much of the medieval period, even having bureaucratic procedures to be followed. The practice had only been recently banned in the Edo period when the Ako incident took place. The prevailing law of that time was kenka ryouseibai - equal fault in the case of any kind of altercation. However, after Asano (Lord of Ako) attacked Kira, Kira received no punishment, and Asano was given the unprecedently harsh punishment of seppuku on that very dayand the dissolution of his house and clan. This is what motivated the Ako Roshi. The first could be withstood, and perhaps only a few, aged, top retainers might commit junshi in protest. But the second meant that all of his retainers, hundreds of them, were out of work. Asano's relatives and remaining top retainers (like Oishi) attempted to get the house and clan restored. In the stories it's often suggested that the ronin waited a year in order to catch Kira by surprise, but the truth was that it was during this year that they attempted to restore the Ako clan by conventional means. However, these hopes were dashed when Asano's brother, Daigaku, was placed in confinement as part of the punishment.

    The goal of the kataki-uchi was to protest the unfairly harsh penalty imposed on the Asano clan, and to restore the house and clan so that the out of work samurai could be be good citizens, and work for their families. And the roshi were very proper about how they did things, turning themselves in afterwards, so that their actions would be recognized for the protest it was, and not mere revenge. And this is why the 47 ronin have been largely admired through history, including today. Not because they killed the guy who killed their lord, but because they did it and sacrificed their lives for the good of the entire Ako-han.

    And it worked. Daigaku was eventually pardoned, and the house and clan was restored, if a bit smaller than it was at its height. That's the thing about Sengoku and early Edo bushi and their "bushido". It was never about "honor" or "death", or even necessarily "loyalty". It was about getting something accomplished.


    I would not presume to speak for Mr. Williams. But I imagine that if you see a high degree of patriotism among American martial artists, it is probably because a good many have spent time in the U.S. military and/or have ties there. There are also many in law enforcement. I see it less as bad taste and more as attempting to find a viable and useful outlet for their martial studies.
    Sebastien Cyr 義真
    春風館道場
    Shunpukan Dojo

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    Quote Originally Posted by roninseb View Post
    Now I am going to take this to another level and would like to get the input of some other American citizen. Why is it that Mr. Williams discourse is all intermixed with combat war defending our country all with samurai honor etc. I have never heard of such a thing here in Canada and have never seen this type of bad taste. Why is it that we seem to see this kind of crap Budo mixed with patriotism mostly in the U.S only or are those people just a small very vocal and visible minority please tell me it is so.
    Well, I obviously cannot and will not speak for Mr. Williams on this. I am in the US military. We have our own code of honor - we do not have to import one. Also, the code of bushido is a fairly modern invention, from what I understand. I would suspect that discerning what the ancient samurai honor code truly was, is a lot of guesswork as is most history that has ambiguous written records.

    Before anyone asks: No, I do not mix my ju-jitsu with patriotism. I personally don't see a problem with instilling patriotism in one's students though. Lots of countries do it.

    Jeff Cook

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    Oh, Mr. Williams, two more questions for you: what is your BJJ rank, and who do you train in BJJ under? Thanks!

    Jeff Cook

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    Quote Originally Posted by roninseb View Post
    I guess you are just not seeing my point in the way it was intended. So the thread drift alert is actually mostly YOUR contribution.
    Indeed, which is why I said "Thread Drift Alert". I was announcing that I was going on a historical tangent. And I think I see your point just fine. I just disagree with it.

    My intention was to show that Mr. Williams has a very romanticized vision of Japanese martial ways and since he had concluded his post with the fact he wrote this while he was at the Sensoji.
    The implication I take from such a reference, if anything, is that Mr. Williams likes to hit the major tourist spots when he visits Japan.

    But the fact remains that many Japanese are ambivalent when it comes to the 47 Ronin and revenge seppuku etc. From what I have witnessed you have mainly 2 camps the all Tenno heika Banzai we are Samurai type and the others who support my point.
    And I continue to disagree. I've lived here five years, have been associating with Japanese people, budo enthusiast and otherwise, for 13 years, and I absolutely have not seen what you maintain. I've heard many say it was tragic that they gave up their lives to get Kira's, but none say, "They were stupid; they should have forewent the ada-uchi and taken care of their families."
    Josh Reyer

    Swa sceal man don, ţonne he ćt guđe gengan ţenceđ longsumne lof, na ymb his lif cearađ. - The Beowulf Poet

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    Red face Bingo

    Quote Originally Posted by roninseb View Post
    From what I have witnessed you have mainly 2 camps the all Tenno heika Banzai we are Samurai type and the others who support my point.
    Sebastion : I think you hit the 'problem' right on the head with this statement, but not just in reference to Japanese, but to all practitioners everywhere. There seems to be 2 main camps of practitioners in general :

    Camp 1 = Those who focus on a sincere physical practice (that could create spiritual refinement), but who consider the spiritual refinement as a secondary benefit, not a primary concern.

    Camp 2 = Those who feel the entire(or most important) point of the practice IS the spiritual refinement and focus their training towards those ends.

    Although I openly admit that my own focus tends towards camp 1, I don't believe that one is better than the other. For me 1 is better and for someone else 2 is. But they can't really be compared very well directly, sort of apples & oranges.

    Thats not a bad thing either until I decide to trash talk just because they don't do it my way. I also find all this talk of 'proper spirit and attitude' somewhat contradictory to the insulting/condescending tones and comments being tossed around freely in this thread and the last as well.

    By all means ask questions about peoples credentials, thats just good common sense. Once you have your answers, make up your own mind about the person's training/lineage etc. That's my impression of one of the main functions of (sincere & quality) online forums, like this one.

    Jeff : I wasn't insinuating anything. If you talk crap about someone's skills/credentials, then I honestly feel that you should be willing to back up that behaviour with proof of your superior skills/knowledge. I also disagree that we should ignore the thread that lead up to this one as that would mean leaving out the antagonizing comments that lead to Mr.Williams creating this thread.

    I don't know and have never met James, indeed the previous thread was my first exposure to him. Since then I have looked up most of the people who regularly commented (google-wise that is) to try to get a better perspective on motives and backgrounds of the various personalities involved. I am trying not to be overly presumptuous, I kind of get the feeling that there are some agendas here I am not fully aware of.

    Anyway I am done here. Most of you (those I googled anyway) have much longer and more indepth training history than I do. I was just discussing my opinion on a forum for...well...discussing opinions. I get the distinct impression, however, from these last two threads that my opinion is not welcome, and the vindictive attitude coming across has somewhat soured my perspective of E-budo as a whole. That's ok, I probably have wasted too much time on the internet lately anyhow.

    Best wishes for all

    Cheers
    Sincerely,
    Greg Carson

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    I guess we can agree to disagree on this one.

    The crowd I hang around with in Japan was basically of the ambivalent type and did not have much regards for people like The 47 Ronin or the Shinsengumi etc... But more for people like Katsu Kaishu , Yamaoka Teshu and Saigo Takamori.

    In any case their point was that this type of blind self sacrifice was not very reflective of true warrior ethics.

    Anyhow back to the main topic I guess.
    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Reyer View Post
    Indeed, which is why I said "Thread Drift Alert". I was announcing that I was going on a historical tangent. And I think I see your point just fine. I just disagree with it.



    The implication I take from such a reference, if anything, is that Mr. Williams likes to hit the major tourist spots when he visits Japan.



    And I continue to disagree. I've lived here five years, have been associating with Japanese people, budo enthusiast and otherwise, for 13 years, and I absolutely have not seen what you maintain. I've heard many say it was tragic that they gave up their lives to get Kira's, but none say, "They were stupid; they should have forewent the ada-uchi and taken care of their families."
    Sebastien Cyr 義真
    春風館道場
    Shunpukan Dojo

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    Quote Originally Posted by James Williams View Post
    It appears that my view of martial arts is from a very different perspective than some on this forum. I study Samurai bujutsu as an art of war. Training in the sword is the foundation of this training and I train with the sword, with the full intention of prevailing in an edged weapon engagement...
    Yes it appears so, but not only in this forum. I would say that even some of the most renowned sensei in Japan that have been preserving a direct lineage that has been passed down for a number of generations would disagree with you on this. 'Prevailing' and killing for the sole purpose of proving your skills is evil and selfish. You cannot win with this type of mind-set. If you claim that 99% of Japanese dojo in Japan are not viewing it in a classical perspective, than you should find another dojo because it seems that you have not visited any dojo where they do infact keep things real, but will not try and prove their machismo skills on anyone, it just doesn't work that way here.

    Chanto benkyo shite kudasai!



    Quote Originally Posted by James Williams View Post
    This is I do not believe, and have not seen demonstrated by anyone, that it is possible to study Samurai bujutsu from a different perspective and fully understand and make practically functional the Samurai military arts that they evolved over centuries...
    Well, here you go...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IreQs...eature=related

    start viewing it at 7min55sec. This is Otake Sensei, head of the Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu. It seems from his perspective that he totally disagrees with you.




    Quote Originally Posted by James Williams View Post
    When the real world hits you the training and mindset that you get in your dojo and the internet will not have prepared you for how fast and ugly things can go sideways. When you are in a dark alley late at night, and you feel the bite and burn of sharp steel on your body you realize that you could die in this place it had better fire your blood as the sharp piece of steel in your hand, and it's immediate and violent use...
    OK this dark alley late at night thing really gives me the impression of you having a mental problem and living in fear and paranoia.

    And last but not least, NOO I am not a cyber Samurai because first of all I am not A SAMURAI!!! grow up! YOU are not one either. This class was abolished, give it up already.
    Tom Karazozis
    °®«ËéČ -Kanshiketsu!

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