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Thread: Imaeda Shinryu Jojutsu 今枝新流 (YT)

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    Default Imaeda Shinryu Jojutsu 今枝新流 (YT)

    For rarity's sake: A youtube clip featuring jojutsu thats not Shinto Muso Ryu or Muhi Muteki Ryu.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8Pmz1fCuZg

    The ryu is "Imaeda Shinryu Jojutsu 今枝新流".
    The only info I got on this ryu is the Japanese Wiki-article. I cant make a good enough translation of it though.. hint hint
    Fredrik Hall
    "To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous." /Confucius

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    great find, does anyone know anything about the style?
    Daniel Mignerey

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    Staff versus staff? You don't see that too often in jo, do you?
    David Sims

    "Cuius testiculos habes, habeas cardia et cerebellum." - Terry Pratchet

    My opinion is, in all likelihood, worth exactly what you are paying for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DDATFUS View Post
    Staff versus staff? You don't see that too often in jo, do you?
    First time I've seen it in koryu. VERY cool osame-type movement by the way.
    Fredrik Hall
    "To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous." /Confucius

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred27 View Post
    First time I've seen it in koryu.
    Yah, I do remember a clip someone (probably you, Fred) posted on here a while back with some gendai group doing jo vs. jo shiai (I seem to recall their stuff being based on Shindo Muso and Kukishin).

    I'm somewhat intrigued by the fact that they have a kata that starts with one person walking behind the other. I know that I've seen kata like that before in Shindo Muso Ryu, and if memory serves a similar kata was demonstrated in a clip of Suio Ryu's jo work.
    David Sims

    "Cuius testiculos habes, habeas cardia et cerebellum." - Terry Pratchet

    My opinion is, in all likelihood, worth exactly what you are paying for it.

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    The kata itself did not strike me as being very combative: each side pretty much exchanged the same movement and screamed a long time. The osame movement looked VERY non-combative; letting it slide down the hand like that where one would risk dropping it seems more show than something you would use in the field.

    But I guess the same could be said for SMR. Once you run the end of your jo though the other guy's oil can who cares if you do osame anyways... so maybe it doesn't matter.

    All in I didn't think it was all that koryu-ish.

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    Per the Wiki article, it is a jo and tanjo school developed in 1773 by a man named Matsuoka Masachika, a samurai of the Tsuyama-han. Matsuoka studied Imaeda-ryu kenjutsu (aka Rikata Ichi-ryu) and developed his jo and tanjo techniques from that. It was originally only passed down in the Matuoka family until the 5th generation.

    Personally, I'm not a fan of simultaneous embu in the first place, let alone multiple simultaneous embu with loud screaming. That's just noise pollution.
    Josh Reyer

    Swa sceal man don, žonne he ęt guše gengan ženceš longsumne lof, na ymb his lif cearaš. - The Beowulf Poet

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    Quote Originally Posted by DDATFUS View Post
    I'm somewhat intrigued by the fact that they have a kata that starts with one person walking behind the other. I know that I've seen kata like that before in Shindo Muso Ryu, and if memory serves a similar kata was demonstrated in a clip of Suio Ryu's jo work.
    Yup yup. There are two such kata in chudan and one in Okuden. Uchida-ryu also has one which is based on the chudan kata.

    Suio-ryu has at least one:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__sxiULghv4 (00:56)
    And again http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSodK...eature=related at 04:00.
    Fredrik Hall
    "To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous." /Confucius

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    A bit more info...though not much more.
    http://ww3.tiki.ne.jp/~rumiya/jyousetsu.html
    Fredrik Hall
    "To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous." /Confucius

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    The kata itself did not strike me as being very combative: each side pretty much exchanged the same movement and screamed a long time. The osame movement looked VERY non-combative; letting it slide down the hand like that where one would risk dropping it seems more show than something you would use in the field.

    But I guess the same could be said for SMR. Once you run the end of your jo though the other guy's oil can who cares if you do osame anyways... so maybe it doesn't matter.

    All in I didn't think it was all that koryu-ish.
    I think we need to remember, though, that what you see in koryu is never what you get. We, as outsiders, have no real idea what the pedagogy of the school is, nor what is really being taught in those movements. Outwardly "combative" stuff isn't always the most "combative," and the real lessons of another school's kata go right over our heads.

    Perhaps the point is that since the stick can drop, you need to be quite mindful of what you are doing, hence enhancing your zanshin practice. More likely, it is simply a movement with subjective significance to the ryu and we just don't get it. As I say, we aren't privy to the threads that unite the teachings in the school.

    I'm always wary of judging schools based on what I'm seeing. I know even in my own practice, I've been dead wrong about judgments. I've made assumptions about movements I watched seniors do, then found I was way off when I actually started doing them.

    But I guess the same could be said for SMR. Once you run the end of your jo though the other guy's oil can who cares if you do osame anyways... so maybe it doesn't matter.
    I think it does matter...quite a bit. Since you are training and not fighting, every moment should be didactic. You aren't simply getting zanshin practice, but you are also improving observation skills. Usually, there is certain timing in which osame should be done and if one person is way ahead or behind, it is wrong: someone wasn't paying attention. Osame provides a wealth of learning opportunities.

    As a matter of fact, in one ryu I train in, I'm called out quite a bit for mistakes in our osame. I don't have the right frame of mind, or the sword is at the wrong angle. Since it matters to my teacher (and his teachers), I get the idea it is pretty important.

    In a fight osame movements may not be so important, but who knows what you take with you from training to a fight? The habits that something like osame instill may just be what carry the day for you.

    Kevin Cantwell

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred27 View Post
    For rarity's sake: A youtube clip featuring jojutsu thats not Shinto Muso Ryu or Muhi Muteki Ryu.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8Pmz1fCuZg

    The ryu is "Imaeda Shinryu Jojutsu 今枝新流".
    The only info I got on this ryu is the Japanese Wiki-article. I cant make a good enough translation of it though.. hint hint
    Ah, you found the videos I uploaded.
    One of my friends did them last year.
    His Karate teacher learned Imaeda Shin ryu when he was young.
    I don“t have further informations, maybe somebody can translate the japanese homepage of the school.

    Regards,
    Michael Reinhardt
    Michael Reinhardt

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    That's the Okayama Daigaku Kobudobu..

    They train in Takeuchi Ryu Kogusoku and Imaeda Shinryu Jo...As well as another associated Iaijutsu Ryuha, the Shisen Ryu..All are trained under the Nisshinkan Dojo of Nakayama Shihan.

    The Imaeda Shinryu has links to the Shojitsu Kenri Kataichi Ryu. That school also practises a form of the the Jo as a subset of the school (Although I believe that they call it Imaeda Ryu, since the "Shin" indicates a later split off that is presently with the Nisshinkan).

    The school focuses on Jo awase Jo and Jo awase Ken...The Kenjutsu work is fun...

    The Kiai used in the school is intense, the final shout lasts some 20 seconds at full pelt while holding zanshin..I believe that they use "ya" "ho" and "ei", although that could be my Takeuchi influencing my hearing...

    Here's the Nisshinkan website;

    http://ww3.tiki.ne.jp/~rumiya/nissinkan.html


    And the Imaeda Shinryu section of the same...

    http://ww3.tiki.ne.jp/~rumiya/jyousetsu.html


    Regards..
    Ben Sharples.
    智は知恵、仁は思いやり、勇は勇気と説いています。

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    Oh..As for the osame motion, I can't say for sure why it's done like that, but I would guess that since the school is not a "battlefield" art, and never was, it is probably more to do with learning control while in Zanshin than something that can be used...

    The only time it is done is when the opponents head has been cracked in as well as can be done, so my guess would be it's just a bit of flash for the school..But as I said, since I don't really study the school I couldn't say..

    I'll ask next time I'm with Nakayama Shihan though...

    The school uses a lot of openings to invite attacks, and in later kata the speed and timing is very hard to get the hang of, but I'd need more training in it to be able to comment any further...

    All the best..
    Ben Sharples.
    智は知恵、仁は思いやり、勇は勇気と説いています。

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    Thanks Ben for the informations!
    I was wondering why the Imaeda Page was related with the Nisshinkan one.

    Thank you!

    Regards,
    Michael Reinhardt
    Michael Reinhardt

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    I tried doing that osame yesterday after regular practice just to check it out. It may be "flashy" but its much more difficult to execute than it first seems. To execute it after a kata, (when you got your blood up), requires solid control.
    Fredrik Hall
    "To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous." /Confucius

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