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Thread: How to Kick

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Svinth View Post
    Kansetsugeri, perhaps? See images D3 and D4 on page 33. https://books.google.com/books?id=EM...karate&f=false
    I have just been looking through that google book again... it seems a lot of the names have either changed over the years or maybe wrongly translated in the first place? it's also weird that the front cover pictures are of guys in Taekwondo uniforms, The guys inside the book though have the kyokushinkai kanji on their gi's.
    A lot of the descriptions of body parts are not what I would call them. For example naka ashi in the book is what I would call chusoko and heiken in the book is what I would call hiraken.

    sorry to derail the thread, just an observation

  2. #32
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    Thoughts, guys, on setting the foot and body for kicking when wearing different kinds of shoes? On different surfaces? How do you advise people to practice these things?
    Kit Leblanc

    In Harm's Way

  3. #33
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    Personally I don't bother. I don't teach Self Defense. I have students who have went out and taught various types of self defense courses. I even had one ask me to help him with one of his women's self defense courses. I told I wasn't qualified and hes wasn't either..... that honked him off. Frankly I am probably as or more qualified than a lot of these jokers out there doing it today.

    My personal thoughts are I am licensed to teach traditional Goju Ryu Karate so that is what I teach. In time of an emergency it may or may not be effective. I have been working in bars for 30+ years. I was a victim of an "attempted" armed robbery and came out well, I have been the point of attemted assault and got 'lucky'. My teacher was a cop. 8 of my seniors coming up through the ranks were cops. I have been around the block a time or two. Practiced and competed in various sport combatives. I liked to "fight".

    But self defense against real violence I am not qualified to teach. There are mental and legal and physiological considerations to take into account and I simply don't think you can teach most people to be able to fight. A big event that steered me away from ever teaching self defense was helping one of my cop sempai training partners with a womens self defense course. In practice I grabbed this woman and she freaked. Women sign up for your courses because they have need for it. The psychological scars they sometimes carry are things I don't fathom. Just touchiing a women who has been a violence victim in practice can be tricky. I decided then I was sticking to Karate, Judo and later BJJ.


    I think a person has the built in programming to be able to flip the switch or they don't. I don't know how you teach that. ...... and I never got into martial arts because I was concerned about self defense. I just liked doing it. My brother came home when I was 10 and he was 24 and he was a black belt under Nishiyama and taught Shotokan and I thought he walked on water and the rest was history.

    We train self defense in terms of waza that was meant for self-defense. But I do everything in the mindset of dojo practice. I teach Budo without an emphasis on the street.
    Last edited by CEB; 7th January 2015 at 19:55.
    Ed Boyd

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  5. #34
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    Sorry about rambling about nonsense. I guess I am feel chatty today.
    Ed Boyd

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  7. #35
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    There are people paying good money to hear rambling tales from "instructors" who have a lot less to say than you Ed. Keep going, the smart people are listening (and me too).
    David Noble
    Shorinji Kempo (1983 - 1988)
    I'll think of a proper sig when I get a minute...

    For now, I'm just waiting for the smack of the Bo against a hard wooden floor....

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  9. #36
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    I'm kinda with you on that Ed, first and foremost I teach Kyokushinkai Karate and I teach the self defence in that syllabus and as you say with the mind set of dojo practice.
    I do however deviate a little with self defence as I worked as a bouncer for many years and you pick up a different set of skills which I pass on to my regular students that are interested in that little bit more.... In this scenario, mind set and the "switch" you mentioned are a big factor in making things work to your advantage.

  10. #37
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    Nice to see very clear statements of what you are doing... Maybe more for Tony but thoughts on kicking wearing a gun belt and vest? Tac gear and laden with heavy equipment - or with the rifle?

  11. #38
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    Mr. Boyd,

    Your post really resonated. I have had the "switch" and violence conversation with several people who refused to believe that there is something in addition to the weekend seminar or safe training. It has scared the pants off of me to watch a few folks I really like think they are ready to be auxiliary security for a function and not view that as "I can safely intervene and protect the civilians" vs. "see something and go call the police, on-site real security, etc."

    I have no personal combatives teaching experience and only speak from being lucky a few times and generally interested.

    As for kicking with gear on, I would love to hear the answer as a civilian. My understanding is that physically the longest range is when then leg is out at waste height. Does tac gear impede movement through the 90 degree mark? No knowledge here but really curious.

    Regards,

    Stephen Baker
    Stephen Baker

    "Never cruel nor cowardly, never give up, never give in." Doctor Who

  12. #39
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    In thinking back (okay, way back) to my days at the police academy, we had a mere week of training in PART (physical apprehension and restraint techniques) and a week of riot control. That was the extent of defensive tactics that we received. We were taught some leg sweeps and low kicks, but nothing above knee level. Wearing a duty belt with a gun, a radio, handcuffs, a baton or flashlight, etc. hanging off it was definitely a deterrent to doing an imitation of Bill Wallace, to say nothing of the fact that to use high kicks effectively requires a lot more training and a higher level of continuing fitness than was likely to be maintained by the majority once they were out of the academy.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  13. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hissho View Post
    Thoughts, guys, on setting the foot and body for kicking when wearing different kinds of shoes? On different surfaces? How do you advise people to practice these things?
    With those things on on those different surfaces. When I first got on the team and started incorporating DT I would do force on force with full gear on, including rifles. One guy learned that when wound up on his back he was like a turtle and couldn't get up. Initially it was the funny, hilarious actually, but it was a sobering fact.
    Also, the gear not only limited how high you can kick, so a front kick to the midsection was out, but your center of balance was off too. So, with all that gear on and the extra weight it added, you immediately learned the risks of trying to balance on one leg.
    My tac vest alone added an additional 25 lbs. That didn't include any other gear that I attached to it like loaded AR magazines.
    Last edited by TonyU; 9th January 2015 at 01:02.
    Tony Urena

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  15. #41
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    Here's some old pics of us doing training with the gear on. Btw, the only "kick" I found to work consistently and able to be executed successfully with all the gear on were knee strikes.



    And here's my old tac vest from when I was on the team.
    Tony Urena

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  17. #42
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    We were taught krav maga. Each day for 3 weeks or maybe a month we would end the day with a two hour DT class. We had three kicks; "A-frame" kick up the middle of their legs aiming for groin, thigh, knee or whatever we could hit, stomp kick to the stomach used mostly to clear distance and then knees to various targets when we were in too tight. I'd rather have both feet on the ground but if I had to kick I'd stick to low kicks to knees/shins/groin.
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by StephenBaker View Post
    Mr. Boyd,

    Your post really resonated. I have had the "switch" and violence conversation with several people who refused to believe that there is something in addition to the weekend seminar or safe training. It has scared the pants off of me to watch a few folks I really like think they are ready to be auxiliary security for a function and not view that as "I can safely intervene and protect the civilians" vs. "see something and go call the police, on-site real security, etc."

    ....
    It just isn't normal for most good decent folks to have to hurt someone bad at an unexpected moments notice. Not sure how you program someone to not freeze if they don't have instincts already built in.

    One random thought. The most profound thing Budo may have taught me is I know a hell of a lot less in my 50s than I knew in my 20s. ( or at least what I thought I knew in my 20s). When I was 25 I probably had an answer for the above.
    Last edited by pgsmith; 9th January 2015 at 21:19. Reason: fixed sentence
    Ed Boyd

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  20. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by CEB View Post

    One random thought. The most profound thing Budo may have taught me is I know a hell of a lot less in my 50s than I knew in my 20s. ( or at least what I thought I knew in my 20s). When I was 25 I probably had an answer the the above.
    So true, Ed. I always said "the more I learn, the more I realize how little I know." Also, as I've gotten older and more experienced I've come to realize I'm not invincible and know my limitations. When we're younger and full of *iss and vinegar we tend to believe we could take on the world. Yeah, no.
    Tony Urena

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  22. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyU View Post
    So true, Ed. I always said "the more I learn, the more I realize how little I know." Also, as I've gotten older and more experienced I've come to realize I'm not invincible and know my limitations. When we're younger and full of *iss and vinegar we tend to believe we could take on the world. Yeah, no.
    I just want to note that at the age of 25 I was the smartest person I knew
    Stephen Baker

    "Never cruel nor cowardly, never give up, never give in." Doctor Who

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