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Thread: Which martial art would you recomend for self defense

  1. #16
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    The guy who carried all the time, even in class, routinely made diamond deliveries. The guy with the shotgun had bad friends, the kind who tried to harvest medicinal herbs without asking.

    That said, Wayne lives in a town where, when the kid you're babysitting dies, you don't call 911, you chuck him off the overpass onto the freeway...

  2. #17
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    Default Hey!!!!

    Hey!!!!

    That said, a drug addicted punk-a** who my mom once babysat when he was a cute toddler was thrown in jail for his megamillionth petty crime. He stole from my mom, he stole from the neighbors, he stole from his own family. He told the judge that he couldn't help it. Da drugs and his mean old friends made him do it. So the judge stuck him in jail and ordered him restricted to a rehab clinic. Before the clinic had any room for him, he was put in a prison for mentally unstable convicts and those undergoing mental evaluation per their trial case. His cell mate was that aforementioned crazy guy who threw the baby off the bridge. Imagine having to go to sleep in the same room as that guy. Karma is a b****, man.

    Wayne

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmuromoto View Post
    As kids we used to joke that nothing really beats Gun-a-te.

    One of us would take a karate stance. "Kah-rah-te!!!!"
    Another would take a Bruce Lee stance: "I beat you with gung fu! Woo-tah!!!"
    Another would take hanmi, "Aikido! Yah!"

    Then a wise guy would point their index finger at us, thumb straight in the air, other fingers curled into a fist. "Gun-a-te!! Bang! Bang! You guys are all dead!"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHdEbRDdMiI


    Wayne Muromoto
    The problem with Gun-a=te is that one will not always have it with them all of the time.

    Like going to or leaving a airport, restaurant, movie, etc. (PER leaving or towards a car),
    Richard Scardina

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmuromoto View Post
    J.C. Penny, Joe, where'd ya train???? Clint Eastwood-town???

    Wayne
    I wonder who was the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly?
    Richard Scardina

  5. #20
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    Default Bad joke made worse...

    All three of 'em left with a Fistfull of Dollars.

    Wayne Muromoto

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmuromoto View Post
    All three of 'em left with a Fistfull of Dollars.

    Wayne Muromoto
    Nope- Only two.
    Richard Scardina

  7. #22
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    I would suggest Krav maga if you are looking purely for self defence
    Bob.


  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob van Tuyn View Post
    I would suggest Krav maga if you are looking purely for self defence
    I think Krav Maga had been mentioned. I wonder if Kajukenbo should be a consideration?
    Richard Scardina

  9. #24
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    In my opinion, for effective self-protection training it is more important to choose an instructor with real street experience, rather than a specific system.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by DenCQB View Post
    In my opinion, for effective self-protection training it is more important to choose an instructor with real street experience, rather than a specific system.
    I agree with this
    Richard Scardina

  11. #26
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    Me too - but one thing to keep in mind is the instructor's placing things in the proper context.

    This is an adjustment that the instructor needs to make - an instructor with street experience as a soldier, a cop, as a doorman, or as a correctional officer will each be coming from a very different perspective.

    While it may seem really cool to take training with someone who tells lots of war stories about their exploits, the real question is whether it can be transferred to useful application for the average person.
    Kit Leblanc

    In Harm's Way

  12. #27
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    This is an adjustment that the instructor needs to make - an instructor with street experience as a soldier, a cop, as a doorman, or as a correctional officer will each be coming from a very different perspective.
    Very true. There is, however, an area which is largely common to all those professions, and that is situational control. This essential aspect includes Theat Evaluation, Combat Indicators/Avoidance, Proxemics, Body Language, Pre-assault Cues, Verbalization, and unobtrusive Ready Positions.
    Experience gained in law enforcement, or, security work in handling potential aggression can form a good basis for a curriculum of self-protection.

  13. #28
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    Agreed, Dennis - however certain things won't be common, even with those essentials when a bad guy is dealing with someone they know is a uniformed officer, a doorman, etc. versus some guy in the fast food line.

    As well, a professionals goals may be very different from those of a citizen, which in turn will influence the application of those essentials.

    By and large, the basis derived from professional work will be very sound; but especially in teaching others the professional will need to adapt the approach to the needs and goals of the students.

    This is as true even within professional circles, soldiers teaching cops and vice versa, cops teaching security professionals - and even what type of security professional.
    Kit Leblanc

    In Harm's Way

  14. #29
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    Default But seriously...

    For what it's worth, since I make no claims to being good at teaching pure self-defense, I would agree with Kit. Dennis makes some good points about teaching basic modes and subjects, but in our society, there is a different response that is considered appropriate and adequate in different situations and for professionals in different fields. A soldier in the field does have to respond quickly and intuitively in a different way compared to a police officer responding to a domestic, say, compared to a security person trying to break up a verbal argument between two drunk friends. In all cases, situational awareness, body balance, distancing, timing, etc. are important, as Dennis notes, but physical responses to different levels and situations of aggressions are different.
    Top that off, as Kit notes, with such professionals teaching each other across professions or "civilians" and you have a lot of places where a "one size fits all" notion or the idea that there is One Best Martial Art or combative system can go awry, although I'm sure Dennis doesn't mean this, but is referring to the general overall concepts.

    (Note: For example, in Hawaii the State Legislature finally fixed a law that made YOU the criminal if someone invaded your house to rob and/or injure you, and you ended up shooting the invader. Until then, you were possibly liable for trying to protect your life, limb and property.)

    It may be true that the best instructor for self-defense is the one with real combative experiences; the US military tries to make use of combat veterans in training and leading new combat troops. One of my students served in Afghanistan and he ended up returning Stateside to train his own squad and is now leading them in his second tour, and one of his comments was that he was always correcting his soldiers regarding "how it really works out there" vs. how they were taught in Basics.

    That said, he felt traditional martial arts training was good in terms of teaching him basic body movement and concepts, drilling those things into his body and mind. ...Not so good concerning small arms and modern weapons, of course. But good in terms of those general concepts Dennis mentioned.

    So if a martial arts instructor is aware of the limitations of what he/she is teaching, and is a good teacher at what the art is (and isn't), There is some worth to MA: as body conditioning, coordination training, concept, theory, movement, and maybe a tiny bit of SD. For pure combatives, of course, you should seek out a combatives instructor; there's no doubt about that.

    Kit and I have PM'd about it, but although we come from different ends, we both have concerns when a martial arts teacher claims to teach a whole lot of self-defense and yet they are teaching and doing things that are combatively ineffective, such as stressing "point-touch" sparring with thick padding, groundwork without concern for concealed weaponry or other attackers, sparring/grappling rules that create dangerous positions and "gaming" that would get you injured in the streets, and so on. These are good conditioning and strength exercises, but one should be very careful about blowing their SD worth out of proportion to what they are good for. And let's not even talk about most aerobic kick-boxing or other such drills. They'll get you in shape, but if you practice bad form without contact or context, you'll just end up doing aerobics, not any MA or self-defense worth much.

    I guess the gist of my post is that people may look for easy answers a lot here, but oftentimes, a simple sounding question can be really complex, filled with "but..." "however..." and "on the other hand..."

    Wayne Muromoto

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  16. #30
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    As well, a professionals goals may be very different from those of a citizen
    Spot on. The biggest difference usually is that those professionals are duty bound to intervene in confrontations, while the citizen isn't. Avoidance and disengagement are essentials in that case.
    The problem is finding an instructor experienced in street confrontations who hasn't been involved in those professional catergories. Who else would be frequently getting involved in violence? And would you want to train with them?
    As always, the trainee should put the training through the filter of what suits his needs, lifestyle etc.
    Without doubt the best training method is high-stress scenario training; facing an active, aggressive assailant, and with the entire confrontation, from pre-fight right through to after-action included, and with decision making built in.

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