Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: KIds and the MMA

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Gardena
    Posts
    2,839
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default KIds and the MMA

    a prospect called and inquired if I teach MMA. Obviously I don't. But one question did captured my interest is:

    Would a 7 year old be better off learning MMA or Karate ?

    My respond was " I don't have that high level of knowledge about kids in MMA, I can only tell you the advantages of kids training in karatedo".

    With this scenario, what do you guys think ?

    Thanks
    Prince Loeffler
    Shugyokan Dojo

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Maryland, USA, by way of Bavaria, Germany, Texas, Indiana and Virginia
    Posts
    490
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default

    Personally, I don't teach kids under 15 or 16 anyway, and haven't run a 'kids class' for many a year.

    Just don't think they're ready to put the attention, intellect or work in until they're older. And I really don't much care for the dojo being used by many parents as an alternative to babysitting services ... of course, I'm not a big fan of getting kids in organized sports leagues either.

    If a parent has a kid who they really want in a club (and let's face it, kids at age 5, 6, 7 or so don't want so much to be a member of a dojo, as they want to be Mighty Mulching Power Mowers or UFC fighters or anime characters), I usually advise them to find a basic judo dojo that takes kids.

    IMHO, a watered down version of trad. karate might be okay, if there's little contact and lots of discipline. Aikido and weapons-based arts are simply no go for kids. Aikido presents too much chance of damage for the kids' joints and munchkins don't have the attention to detail or mental control for serious weapons.

    I suppose an MMA gym with a good, experienced and attentive kids teacher could be a decent choice, not that different from a good judo dojo ...
    Chuck Gordon
    Mugendo Budogu
    http://www.budogu.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Lansing, MI
    Posts
    1
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    It's all about the school and the instructor. An MMA school is less likely to focus on traditional martial art values. What I mean by that is, for kids, the elements that are assumed in traditional martial arts are critical (IMO). Respect, discipline, focus, etc. That's not to say there aren't some MMA schools that have those elements, they just usually have a different focus in their schools.

    I'd encourage you to investigate both, get a sense for what each school feels is important to them. It may just be a phone call or a visit to the school. I wouldn't take my kid with me though, he/she might get excited about a school that you do't feel would be a good fit, then you're the bad guy.

    A lot of people I know growing up in the inner city, learned some great life skills through boxing (the MMA of the day). But you can also produce a bully, if the school and the instructor are irresponsible about what and how they teach.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    210
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default

    There is some research that indicates that while traditional MA training reduces aggression among teens, non-traditional training has no effect or even increases aggressiveness. I can find the cite if you like.

    If it were my kid and I was looking for MA training I'd start with Judo and then, if the child showed interest, switch to a striking art in the teens.

    Of course, that's not how I did it. In the 80's when I started training we didn't have a menu of options. I was lucky that the local YMCA had a very patient and talented teacher of Moo Duk Kwan.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    210
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default

    Here's some of the research:

    Nosanchuk, T. (1981) The Way of the Warrior: The affects of traditional martial arts training on aggressiveness. Human Relations 34 (6).

    LaMarre, B. and T. Nosanchuk (1999) Judo - The Gentle Way: A replication of studies on martial arts and aggression. Perceptual and Motor Skills 88.

    Trulson, M. (1986) Martial Arts Training: A novel "cure" for juvenile delinquency. Human Relations 39 (12).

    and my own minor contribution -

    Wingard, G. (2002) Aggressive Discourse in the Martial Arts: An ethnographic snapshot. Journal of Asian Martial Arts 11 (1).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Fort Bragg, NC
    Posts
    284
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Hi all,

    Long time no post.

    I now teach "MMA" as in I teach Grappling (BJJ, Judo, Wrestling) and Striking (Boxing, MT, Karate non traditionally) and compete in MMA matches.

    I also teach kids and for the most part at 7 its just another activity for them. It doesn't matter if it was MMA, Karate, or soccer. When they get into their teen years is when they will decide to take the training seriously or not.

    I often warn parents that they shouldn't look to MA to instill discipline, respect, etc in their kids. That's their job. My kids are well behaved because I taught them to be not because of MA. (Besides they all have their own tastes. My oldest loves BJJ and Judo. My middle Karate, and my youngest wants to hit pple with swords)
    LeTerian Bradley

    There are no excuses on the mat, in the cage, or on the battlefeild! Train wisely!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Hollywood, FL
    Posts
    15
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    There is some research that indicates that while traditional MA training reduces aggression among teens, non-traditional training has no effect or even increases aggressiveness. I can find the cite if you like.
    Could you cite this research for me on the non-traditional side? Or perhaps the research you've posted also contains non-traditional info. It just seemed like it was all about traditional MA.

    Thank You.
    -James Smith
    Shintoyoshinkai Jujutsu (Gendai)
    Shuri Ryu Karate

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    US
    Posts
    8
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Really interesting subject matter. I was advised similarly by a good friend of mine who suggested I teach three to four year olds how to fall. But, given how short their attention spans were, it was almost a lost cause.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    If you find a great instructor who teaches mma but also focuses on respect, discipline, and good morals it may workout well. However, the kid has to be really interested in learning in order for this to work.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    210
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default

    James,

    Sorry to resurrect a dead thread. I haven't been on e-budo for awhile. If you read the articles I mentioned at least two of them have comparisons between traditional and non-traditional arts. They aren't just reviews of traditional MA.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •