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Thread: Thoughts on the Bujinkan

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    Default Thoughts on the Bujinkan

    I have been seeing a lot of talk about how the Bujinkan is not Ninjutsu, and i was curuious what people thought.

    I personally have only been practicing it for a few months, and it seems to fullfill the spirit of ninjutsu as i know it, weather or not it is traditional Ninjutsu or not.

    I was mildly dissapointed however that it seems to only go through the "martial" skills and not delve into the rest.

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    The rest of what?
    Evan London
    Dojo-cho, Jinenkan Inazuma Dojo
    Orange, CT
    www.Jinenkan-Inazuma.com

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    Wink

    "The rest", of course, is the spirit of Budo and not just the physical abilities. Martial arts are more than fight, sport, or self-defense. The real budo have something beyond. It's just take a look at the life of names like Morihei Ueshiba, Doshin So, Funakoshi and so on.

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    Ah. I was expecting the usual questions about climbing trees, hiding in in plain sight and kuji.

    My answer is that the other aspects of budo only come through rigorous and dedicated training under an experienced and proficient teacher. "All the rest" can only be properly understood and achieved when one has a solid foundation of proper movement and a good grasp of ma-ia, zanshin, and kake hiki. It is like anything else. You need to learn to crawl before you can walk, learn to walk before you can run, and learn to run before you can truely appreciate sitting still. You need extreme patience to achive "all the rest".
    Evan London
    Dojo-cho, Jinenkan Inazuma Dojo
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    www.Jinenkan-Inazuma.com

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    Talking

    "Ah. I was expecting the usual questions about climbing trees, hiding in in plain sight and kuji."

    Well... perhaps that too...

    I hope not...

    Good answer.

    Gassho!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Evan London View Post
    Ah. I was expecting the usual questions about climbing trees, hiding in in plain sight and kuji.

    My answer is that the other aspects of budo only come through rigorous and dedicated training under an experienced and proficient teacher. "All the rest" can only be properly understood and achieved when one has a solid foundation of proper movement and a good grasp of ma-ia, zanshin, and kake hiki. It is like anything else. You need to learn to crawl before you can walk, learn to walk before you can run, and learn to run before you can truely appreciate sitting still. You need extreme patience to achive "all the rest".
    To be honest, a little of both

    But im more curious if Bujinkan is a good starting place or not. I don't know if it delves into the spiritual side of it.

    As far as "ninja magic" ive got a copy of the Shoninki im reading, and i can find other translations of similar stuff to fulfill my desire to learn that.

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    Define "spiritual".
    Brett Guillory
    5th kyu GWNBF
    9th kyu KJJR

    Brett's as green as they come." - J. Chambers

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chocrates View Post
    To be honest, a little of both

    But im more curious if Bujinkan is a good starting place or not. I don't know if it delves into the spiritual side of it.

    As far as "ninja magic" ive got a copy of the Shoninki im reading, and i can find other translations of similar stuff to fulfill my desire to learn that.
    I would say that it depends highly on who your teacher is. The extent of their training experience will significantly impact their ability to transmit that information to you, or more importantly, teach you methods to find the answers within yourself. The best and fastest way to get your answers is to actually go to Japan and train there with Hatsumi Sensei and his senior instructors. Barring that, it is pretty much up to luck and research for you to find a qualified teacher who know and can teach you what you are looking for.
    Evan London
    Dojo-cho, Jinenkan Inazuma Dojo
    Orange, CT
    www.Jinenkan-Inazuma.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chocrates View Post
    To be honest, a little of both

    But im more curious if Bujinkan is a good starting place or not. I don't know if it delves into the spiritual side of it.

    As far as "ninja magic" ive got a copy of the Shoninki im reading, and i can find other translations of similar stuff to fulfill my desire to learn that.
    Er....which copy, out of interest?
    With Respect,
    Chris Parker.

    兵法二天一流剣術 Hyoho Niten Ichi Ryu Kenjutsu (https://www.facebook.com/MelbKoryuKenjutsuKeikoKai/)
    天真正伝香取神道流兵法 Tenshinsho Den Katori Shinto Ryu (https://www.facebook.com/MelbKoryuKenjutsuKeikoKai/)
    熟練道場武道兵法 Jukuren Dojo Budo Heiho (www.budomelbourne.com)

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    Er....which copy, out of interest?
    Beat me to it lol!
    Jon Gillespie

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    Much of the "spiritual" aspects of martial arts come through the actual training of the techniques. The focus requried in learning, and the execution of the techniques refine the spirit and break down the ego (especially after you've been hit and slammed hard for a few years.)
    Eric Bell

    Genbukan Ninpo

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    Quote Originally Posted by EWBell View Post
    Much of the "spiritual" aspects of martial arts come through the actual training of the techniques. The focus requried in learning, and the execution of the techniques refine the spirit and break down the ego (especially after you've been hit and slammed hard for a few years.)
    Perfectly said Mr. Bell.
    Evan London
    Dojo-cho, Jinenkan Inazuma Dojo
    Orange, CT
    www.Jinenkan-Inazuma.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parker View Post
    Er....which copy, out of interest?
    The Antony Cummins version.

    Ive heard bad things about it.... but it seems alright, unless i want to learn japanese well enough to get the real intent from it

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    I appologize for the double post, can't seem to find the edit button....

    Quote Originally Posted by EWBell View Post
    Much of the "spiritual" aspects of martial arts come through the actual training of the techniques. The focus requried in learning, and the execution of the techniques refine the spirit and break down the ego (especially after you've been hit and slammed hard for a few years.)
    That is interesting, i never would have thought that.

    The only reason im giving pause is because of things like this:

    http://ninjutsu.com/

    my instructor sent me here to get a pair of tabi.

    It just seems so commercialized, granted its pretty much expected to be.
    I think i will stick with it until ive got my basics down a bit better, then either crosstrain or find another "branch" if im still having hesitations about where its going.

    I appreciate the help

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chocrates View Post
    I appologize for the double post, can't seem to find the edit button....



    That is interesting, i never would have thought that.

    The only reason im giving pause is because of things like this:

    http://ninjutsu.com/

    my instructor sent me here to get a pair of tabi.

    It just seems so commercialized, granted its pretty much expected to be.
    I think i will stick with it until ive got my basics down a bit better, then either crosstrain or find another "branch" if im still having hesitations about where its going.

    I appreciate the help
    Mind you I am not Bujinkan, so my perspective may be quite different than what you experience. However, I wouldn't let what Mr. Van Donk puts on his website influence your perception of Ninpo. That stuff is very much his, and not your organization as a whole.

    My recommendation is to keep training, and talk to your instructor about it. If what is offered isn't what you want, then try one of the other Ninpo organizations, and see if they are more what you are looking for.
    Eric Bell

    Genbukan Ninpo

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