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Thread: Koryu demonstrations & events in USA

  1. #16
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    Hello Dave,

    Is there a web site for this event?

    Thanks,
    John

  2. #17
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    Please call me Russ!

    If I'm not mistaken this sounds like the first event of it's kind (at least in my generation) within the continental USA. This many big names from Koryu Bujutsu at one public event is a rare experience and the spectators are in for a real treat.

    It certainly beats the living snot out of the Oregon Sakura Matsuri.

    Please convince the cultural society to tape it for posterity!! It should be simply amazing.

    Incidentally, the part of "Dave Lowry" played by Tom Cruise is good casting...kudos to your agent.

    -R


    Originally posted by Dave Lowry
    Mr. Ebert,
    Yes, I will be participating.

    No plans at this time to video the demonstrations, though visitors of course are free to do so. If so, my part will be played by Tom Cruise.

    Cordially,

  3. #18
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    Well, let's not forget that Mr. Cruise reportedly spent MONTHS practicing to become an expert with the sword. So. . .Mr. Lowry might commend Mr. Cruise for the demo for more reasons than his hollywood looks.

    Best regards,
    Arman Partamian

  4. #19
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    All,
    I have been asked to post the schedule for budo at the upcoming Japanese Festival. There may be some changes in the particular ryu demonstrated at the times given, but this should be the way things go.
    Note: KSR=Tenshinsho-den Katori Shinto ryu. YSR=Yagyu Shinkage ryu, Buko ryu=Toda-ha Buko ryu. SMR=Shinto Muso ryu. Fuzoku ryu=ryu attached to SMR, e.g. Isshin ryu, Uchida ryu, etc.

    SATURDAY—
    12:30-1:30 Koryu Bugei (Schoenberg Auditorium) KSR, YSR, Araki ryu
    1:00-2:00 Japanese Karate (Lehman Lawn)
    2:30-4:00 Koryu (Knolls) SMR, Fuzoku ryu, Buko ryu
    5:00-6:00 Judo (Lehman Lawn)


    SUNDAY
    10:00-11:00 Aikido (Lehman Lawn)
    12:30-1:30 Japanese Karate (Lehman Lawn)
    1:30-2:30 Koryu Bugei (Knolls) Araki ryu, YSR, SMR, KSR
    2:30-3:30 Kendo (Lehman Lawn)
    4:00-5:00 Koryu Bugei ( Shoenberg Auditorium)SMR, Buko ryu, Fuzoku


    MONDAY
    10:00-11:00 Aikido (Lehman Lawn)
    11:30-12:30 Koryu Bugei (Shoenberg Auditorium)KSR, YSR, Buko ryu
    1:30-2:30 Kendo (Lehman Lawn)
    3:00-4:00 Judo (Lehman Lawn)

    Cordially,
    Dave Lowry

  5. #20
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    Dave,

    Can you tell us whether multiple demonstrations for the same ryu are planned to be different topics, or similar demonstrations repeated on different days?

    This information would be helpful to those of us who might come in from out of town in planning our itineraries.

    Thanks,

    Chris
    Chris Guzik


    "You can never do a kindness too soon,
    because you never know how soon it will be too late."

    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  6. #21
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    Default Can't speak for anyone else

    Steve Bowman and my presentations of Araki-ryu and Buko-ryu are going to be mostly different kata in each demo.

    Best

  7. #22
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    Dear Mr. Guzik,
    Most of the demonstrations have not been planned in that detail yet. It has been my experience that such planning often takes place about ten minutes before the actual event.
    I would think the variety of ryu being demonstrated would be sufficiently broad to hold the interest of the average e-budo member who comes, even if kata are repeated at different times.

    Incidentally, if you are coming from out of town, a caveat: Do not try "St. Louis style" pizza, no matter what you are told. Widely celebrated by the locals, it is an entirely inedible concoction, the relationship to real pizza being approximately what the relationship a Taco Bell chilito has with Mexican cuisine.

    Cordially,
    Dave Lowry

  8. #23
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    Originally posted by Dave Lowry
    .

    Incidentally, if you are coming from out of town, a caveat: Do not try "St. Louis style" pizza, no matter what you are told. Widely celebrated by the locals, it is an entirely inedible concoction, the relationship to real pizza being approximately what the relationship a Taco Bell chilito has with Mexican cuisine.

    Cordially,
    Wish I could make it.....

    You can't go too wrong with barbecue in St. Louis, though....I totally agree with you about the "pizza," being a total New Yorker pizza snob, albeit one with functional taste buds.
    Aaron J. Cuffee


    As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.
    - H.L. Mencken

  9. #24
    Mekugi Guest

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    Originally posted by Dave Lowry
    Incidentally, if you are coming from out of town, a caveat: Do not try "St. Louis style" pizza, no matter what you are told. Widely celebrated by the locals, it is an entirely inedible concoction, the relationship to real pizza being approximately what the relationship a Taco Bell chilito has with Mexican cuisine.

    Cordially,
    Is that like comparing Budweiser to "Red Hook"? How is the beer scene there, while I'm at it?

  10. #25
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    Dear all,

    Wow!!!! So many big names together..... wish I could be there too..

    I agree with Mr. Ebert, if the possibility of taping it arouses, it should be a very precious archive for any commited bugeiha to have.
    If nobody wants to "sacrifice", I have a couple of tricks up my sleeve in the department of filming... I would kindly oblige

    Good luck to all participants.

    Sincirely from the bottom of Africa,
    Harry Ravelo

  11. #26
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    Default STL Beer & Stuff

    I am a St. Louis native, although I haven't lived there since 1991, I visit at least 2x a year. The pizza thing is true. It is well loved by the locals, but can't compare to NY or Chicago pizza. There are, however, a few local joints that do a good facsimile of NY style pizza.

    The best local brew is Schlafly's varieties of beer. It is an old brewery, reinvigorated by microbrew enthusiasts in the last couple of years. Good stuff.

    Stuff to try in St. Louis:

    Toasted ravioli.

    Amighetti's sandwiches (on the Hill, the local traditionally Italian neighborhood).

    Local small donut shop donuts (there are a million of these joints, and they're all better than Krispy Kreme).

    St. Louis BBQ, similar to KC BBQ, but sweeter and smokier.

    Also, if you've got kids with you, or are just a kid at heart PLEASE visit the City Museum, one of the coolest, wierdest places around (with a cute little log cabin bar for the grown ups).

    And going up into the Arch is cheesy, but also a genuinely freaky experience, with rocking and rolling, egg shaped elevators.

    For nightlife, theaters, and various restaurants, check out the U City/Delmar Loop, the South Grand Corridor, and the Washington Ave. club/warehouse district.

    Have fun. I wish I could get back for the demo. I hope it is a great success!
    John Connolly

    Yamamoto Ha Fluffy Aiki Bunny Ryu

  12. #27
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    If perchance you make it to the St. Louis Library, note that this is the centennial year of the 1904 World's Fair. Said fair commemorated Lewis and Clark, and was supposed to have occurred in 1903, but there were cost overruns. Things you might know today introduced at that fair include peanut butter and ice cream cones.

    Besides Giant Beaupre, the world's tallest man (8'2"; he died while exhibiting at the fair, and because his parents couldn't afford to ship him home, his corpse ended up on display), there were also various foreign exhibits. The Filipinos were dressed up as headhunters, no matter that they came from Manila, and there was of course a Japan Pavilion.

    Seigo Arai, a future leader of the Issei community in Texas, was among the fellows who built the Japanese pavilion for the 1904 fair, and I'm betting that there was a judo exhibition somewhere in there. Maybe kendo, too. Somebody would need to check the papers to be sure.

    Another St. Louis link to the JMA of that period include Martha Blow Wadsworth training in judo in DC with Mrs. Yamashita. Meanwhile, Wadsworth's sister, Susan Blow, was a pioneer in the Kindergarten movement in the USA. Going the other direction, I believe that this was the same Blow family that originally owned Dred Scott.

  13. #28
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    So, you are saying kindergarten Blow's...
    Doug Walker
    Completely cut off both heads,
    Let a single sword stand against the cold sky!

  14. #29
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    At least I didn't say that Kindergarten sucks.

    BTW, have they lowered the price any on beer at the St. Louis airport? Last time I went there was maybe 15 years ago, and Bud was about five bucks a bottle.

  15. #30
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    Mr. Svinth is characteristically correct and thorough in his note on St. Louis. The Japanese Pavilion was a popular part of the 1904 World’s Fair apparently. It may be of some interest that almost nothing remains of the Japanese exhibit; local legend has it that many of the objects on display there found their way into the homes of professors at a nearby university. Indeed, some intriguing artefacts do show up from time to time at estate sales in homes in the area. All that remains are a waterfall from the garden at the pavilion, which is at the west side of Forest Park, and a wrought iron lantern that we discovered by accident in storage at the Missouri Botanical Garden and which is now in the archives there. (Additionally, Kansas Citians will recognise the life-sized bronze eagle along Ward Parkway, which was a part of the original World’s Fair Japanese exhibit.)
    We had more than six hours of koryu embu at the Festival. Attendance this year was around 30,000 for the entire three-day event.
    My warmest thanks to all of you who came from some distance to see the demonstrations. I was approached by people from Texas, Washington, DC, Chicago, Denver, and Philadelphia, all of whom noted they had read about the event on this site.
    If you enjoyed these demonstrations or if you would like to see them happen again next year I would urge you to write to the Director of Public Events at the Missouri Botanical Garden, Mr. Jim Kalkbrenner: jim.kalkbrenner@mobot.org
    (Not sure what the price of the local brew would be at the airport. I have never been that thirsty.)

    Cordially,
    Dave Lowry

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