Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 31 to 41 of 41

Thread: Tegata collection

  1. #31
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default Musoyama Musashi

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ozeki Musoyama.jpg 
Views:	124 
Size:	83.3 KB 
ID:	10825

    We have another powerful Ozeki from the Musashigawa Beya, Musoyama Musashi. Musoyama was another amateur champion who made it into the top ranks of professional sumo. He was a strong oshi-sumo (pushing and thrusting sumo) rikishi. He only won one yusho in 2000 which saw his promotion to Ozeki. Most of his Ozeki career was plagued by injury until he retired in 2004. I've always favored Musoyama's bold signature on his tegata.

    After retirement from competition he stayed on as a coach at Musashigawa Beya. He took the Fujishima elder name. In 2010 he took over the Musashigawa Beya and changed the name to Fujishima Beya. This allowed former Yokozuna Musashimaru the chance to take the Musashigawa Oyakata name and reopen the Heya.
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default Miyabiyama Tetsushi

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ozeki Miyabiyama.jpg 
Views:	113 
Size:	92.0 KB 
ID:	10826

    The last Musashigawa/Fujishima Beya tegata I have belongs to the controversial Miyabiyama Tetsushi. Miyabiyama was another amateur sumo champion turned pro. His career started off very promising as he blasted his way through the middle divisions to reach the top ranks in just eight months.
    When he entered the top division he didn’t even have enough hair to grow a top-knot. He turned in two very strong runner up performances which saw him get promoted to the sport’s second highest rank of Ozeki. The promotion turned out to be the beginning of the controversies that surrounded him.

    When the directors of the Sumo Kyokai were deliberating Miyabiyama’s promotion to Ozeki three of the ten directors voted against the promotion. He had only been in the top division for a year and some of the directors thought that was too soon. They were right because he only had an eight basho career at Ozeki. His Ozeki career was one of the fastest to the rank and one of the shortest lived at the rank. This wouldn’t be the end of trouble for him though. In 2010 he was suspended and demoted to the Juryo ranks for his involvement in baseball gambling. He would eventually return to the highest ranks and made it to Komusubi but then fell as fast as he rose back to Juryo ranks where he retired.

    After retirement Miyabiyama took over the Futagoyama Oyakata name from the 1st Takanohana and he is now a coach at the Fujishima Beya.
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default Kakuryu Rikisaburo 71st Yokozuna

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Yokozuna 71 Kakuryu.jpg 
Views:	101 
Size:	100.9 KB 
ID:	10827

    This tegata was a birthday present from my parents and it is from the newest Yokozuna and 4th Mongolian to reach the top rank, Kakuryu. Kakuryu, unlike the other Mongolian Yokozuna did not come from a family of wrestlers and wrestling was never even an interest of his (he preferred basketball as a kid). He only got interested in sumo after watching Kyokushuzan (see the 1st tegata I posted) and Kyokutenho on TV. When he arrived in Japan to train at the Izutsu Beya he had never wrestled before and only weighed 143 lbs. Izutsu Oyakata thought he would have made a better hairdresser than rikishi when he first saw the skinny hopeful. Now Kakuryu is the only Sekitori ranked wrestler in the stable and has surpassed his master. He has had 5 runner-up tournaments and he won one Emperor's Cup which saw to his promotion to Yokozuna. When he won the cup he said, "I will work hard to become the kind of wrestler who can make everyone happy."

    In addition to Mongolian Kakuryu speaks Japanese, English and Russian.
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default

    Hello all,

    Sorry for being away for so long. I'm in the middle of grad school, I still work full time and back in April I became a father to a beautiful daughter. I can barely fit in keiko much less net time. I have two pretty exciting tegata coming my way. One should be here in a week or two and the other I'll likely get some time in the fall. I'll be sure to share once I get them.

    Cheers,
    Chris
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  5. Likes Tripitaka of AA liked this post
  6. #35
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default Harumafuji Kohei 70th Yokozuna

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Yokozuna 70 Harumafuji.jpg 
Views:	22 
Size:	117.4 KB 
ID:	10961

    Here is my latest tegata from the 3rd Mongolian Yokozuna Harumafuji. Harumafuji is a rikishi after my own heart because of his deep interest in public safety, law enforcement, and higher education! His father was killed in a car accident. Because the EMS response is so poor (Mongolia has few ambulances) his father died at the crash site, whereas in Japan, the US, the UK etc. he likely would have been transported to a hospital and survived. Harumafuji has been instrumental in obtaining proper ambulances for his nation because of this tragedy. He is also qualified to be a police officer in Mongolia and wrote a university thesis comparing Mongolian and Japanese law enforcement models.

    Harumafuji comes from a Mongolian wrestling family and he naturally took to sumo. He began his career under the name Ama but changed it to Harumafuji upon reaching the rank of Ozeki. His coach is the former Yokozuna Asahifuji (see above). Although he had a slow start as Yokozuna Harumafuji has an impressive 8 championships under his belt. He is rather light, weighing in just under 300 lbs but makes up for his size with a fast tachiai and a vast array of techniques (he has used 42 different kimarite to win to date!). Harumafuji's excellent career has sadly been overshadowed by his fellow countryman Hakuho. I'm hopeful that Harumafuji will break the double digits in championships though!

    Probably in Oct. or Nov. I'll have another tegata posting. Stay tuned!
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  7. Likes Cady Goldfield liked this post
  8. #36
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default Hakuho Sho 69th Yokozuna

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Yokozuna 69 Hakuho.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	96.7 KB 
ID:	10975

    As promised my latest tegata. This one is a big one, really big. This tegata was made by the greatest rikishi of all times Hakuho! For nearly 40 years the late, great Taiho's record of 32 basho wins stood. The only sumotori to come close is the recently deceased Chiyonofuji's 31 wins. In 2014 Hakuho matched that record. In 2015 he broke that record and now he stands at 37 Emperor's Cup wins and counting! This man has tied or owns nearly every sumo record and he doesn't show any signs of slowing down.

    Hakuho is the second Mongolian Yokozuna of four. He comes from a Mongolian wrestling family. His father was the Mongolian wrestling equivalent of Yokozuna and he won the nation's first Olympic medal, a silver in free style wrestling, in 1968. Hakuho focused on basketball as a youth but later became interested in sumo, admiring the rikishi for their size (he was small for his age). He was invited by Kyokushuzan (see above) to Japan to try out for sumo. No one would recruit him. Kyokushuzan was able to talk Miyagino Oyakata into recruiting the boy. Hakuho means White Phoenix (a reference to Taiho, the Great Phoenix). He certainly exceeded his namesake. Hakuho is one of those athletes who dominates their respective sport. Between 2010 when Asashoryu resigned and 2012 when Harumafuji was promoted Hakuho was the only Yokozuna in the sport. Even with the two other Mongolian Yokozuna active Hakuho is still a dominating force. There have only been two Japanese rikishi to win the Cup in the past decade, and both wins came this year. The scene has been controlled by the Mongolians and Europeans. I think as long as Hakuho is wrestling we won't see any native Japanese boys wearing the tsuna.
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  9. Likes Cady Goldfield liked this post
  10. #37
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default Asashoryu Akinori 68th Yokozuna

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Yokozuna 68 Asashoryu.JPG 
Views:	37 
Size:	115.4 KB 
ID:	11041

    Here is another controversial but great Yokozuna's tegata. Asashoryu (morning blue dragon) was the first (of four so far) Mongolian to reach the sport's highest rank. Like most of the Mongolian rikishi in sumo, Asashoryu came from a Mongolian wrestling family. He posted 25 yusho making him 4th on the all-time list behind Hakuho (37), Taiho (32), and Chiyonofuji (31). For all his talent in the ring he was a bit of a problem in and outside of the dohyo. He was frequently chided for behavior unbecoming of a Yokozuna ranging from small things like taking prize money with his left hand to brawling with other rikishi in the locker room and vandalizing their cars. He is the only Yokozuna to have been disqualified from a match for pulling Kyokushuzan's hair, suspended from a tournament for missing regional matches (he claimed he was injured and went home to Mongolia, only to be caught on camera playing in a charity soccer match), and eventually being forced to retire for criminal assault allegations. Had he not been forced to retire who knows how many more basho he would have won? We might have been talking about Asashoryu breaking Taiho's record instead of Hakuho. As it stands we'll never know. While he was wrestling he was a force of nature.

    Presently Asashoryu is a businessman in Mongolia. In addition to his investment company he also provides resources to schools and scholarships for college bound Mongolian students.
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  11. #38
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default Takanohana Koji 65th Yokozuna

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	15350704_941703462633869_8895919882144031202_n.jpg 
Views:	38 
Size:	127.3 KB 
ID:	11042

    I've picked up two new tegata. This first one is Takanohana Koji 65th Yokozuna and the younger of the two Hanada brothers. Above I shared a plain autograph on a shikishi. I finally was able to pick up an actual tegata from Takanohana.
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  12. #39
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default Akebono Taro 64th Yokozuna

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Yokozuna 64 Akebono.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	110.4 KB 
ID:	11043

    Here is the 2nd tegata I recently obtained, Akebono Taro, 64th Yokozuna and the first foreign born grand champion. Akebono was born Chad Rowan in Hawaii. He was interested in basketball and even had a scholarship to play at Hawaii Pacific University. He was introduced to the famous Hawaiian sumo wrestler and elder Azumazeki Oyakata (wrestled as Takamiyama, the first foreigner to win a honbasho). Azumazeki Oyakata was worried that Akebono, at 6'8" (203cm), was too tall for sumo. Akebono proved him wrong and climbed through the ranks. Fighting at 518 lbs he was one of the largest rikishi. He was rivals with the Hanada brothers Takanohana and Wakanohana and with them he helped bolster sumo's popularity to new heights. He would end up winning 11 honbasho in his career and even preformed a dohyo-iri ceremony at the opening of the Nagano Olympics.

    Akebono became a Japanese citizen. After retirement and a brief stint as an elder coach at the Azumazeki stable he entered MMA. His MMA career was less than stellar and he gave it up in favor of pro-wrestling. He has been an active pro-wrestler since 2005.
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  13. #40
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default Mainoumi Shuhei

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	15492618_953191744818374_555075065076863682_n.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	56.5 KB 
ID:	11046

    Mainoumi Shuhei was an inspiring rikishi. Standing at 5’ 7.5” tall and weighing in at 216 lbs (he and I are very close in size) he was one of the smallest top ranked sumotori in the modern era. Because he was too short to meet the Sumo Kyokai’s minimum height requirements he had a doctor inject silicone into his head! Even though he was very small he made it to the San’yaku rank of Komusubi. Mainoumi wrestled in the 1990s during the era of the giant Hawaiians. In spite of his size he had surprising success. He even beat the 630 lbs Konishiki (sadly injuring himself in the process)! Besides being a Giant Slayer he was also a technical wizard and was called the “Department Store of Technique.” Mainoumi bested the 550 lbs Akebono with a very rare kimarite called mitokorozeme a simultaneous leg grab, leg sweep, and push out. He also introduced the nekodamashi, a loud clap at the beginning of the tachiai to distract the opponent and gain advantage.

    After Mainoumi’s retirement he left the sumo world, much to the dismay of the Sumo Kyokai. Sumo’s popularity was at a low point in 1999 when he retired and his popularity might have helped the sport. Instead he began a career as a TV personality, sumo commentator, and actor. He appeared as one of the rikishi in the movie “Memoirs of a Geisha.”
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  14. Likes Cady Goldfield liked this post
  15. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    1
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Hi Christopher,

    Do you know what the hanko at the top right corner of the tegata says and means? I see similar ones with the same kanji on Hakuho's, Harumafuji's and Kakuryu's. I recently acquired one made by Chiyonofuji, which has a hanko very similar to the one on Asashoryu's tegata with the same kanji in a gunbai. I'm just trying to find out as much information as I can about it. Thank you.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Similar Threads

  1. Nihonto magazine collection
    By JAnstey in forum Buy, Sell, or Trade
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 9th June 2010, 02:54
  2. Crib-collection
    By JL. in forum Shorinji Kempo
    Replies: 89
    Last Post: 9th June 2008, 06:54
  3. Konishki Tegata
    By ljneuman in forum Buy, Sell, or Trade
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 22nd December 2005, 22:32
  4. Thinning collection...
    By koma in forum Buy, Sell, or Trade
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28th October 2003, 09:35
  5. Tegata!
    By Kendoguy9 in forum Sumo
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 1st September 2003, 09:12

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •