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Thread: Miyamoto Musashi and "Internal" Swordsmanship

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    Default Miyamoto Musashi and "Internal" Swordsmanship

    There are some direct (and some subtle) references that seem to point to some of the factors necessary for internal structure and power, in a description of proper posture and demeanor by legendary 17th-century swordsman Miyamoto Musashi,:


    “The face is calm, neither turned upwards, downwards or to the side; the eyes slightly closed without movement of the eyeballs; the brow unwrinkled; the eyebrows slightly gathered, the bridge of the nose straight; the chin neither stuck out or drawn in too much; the nape of the neck equally straight and the spinal column full of energy. Below the dropped shoulders the body is perfectly relaxed; the spinal column is in place; the buttocks drawn in; the legs, from the knees to the ankles are firmly set on the ground; the hips are not twisted; the stomach is firmly shaped.”

    Interesting to consider, at least.
    Last edited by Cady Goldfield; 27th April 2015 at 23:06.
    Cady Goldfield

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cady Goldfield View Post
    There are some direct (and some subtle) references that seem to point to some of the factors necessary for internal structure and power, in a description of proper posture and demeanor by legendary 17th-century swordsman Miyamoto Musashi,:


    “The face is calm, neither turned upwards, downwards or to the side; the eyes slightly closed without movement of the eyeballs; the brow unwrinkled; the eyebrows slightly gathered, the bridge of the nose straight; the chin neither stuck out or drawn in too much; the nape of the neck equally straight and the spinal column full of energy. Below the dropped shoulders the body is perfectly relaxed; the spinal column is in place; the buttocks drawn in; the legs, from the knees to the ankles are firmly set on the ground; the hips are not twisted; the stomach is firmly shaped.”

    Interesting to consider, at least.
    We do try to incorperate it into practice. The posture is not too difficult with a very low stance. Took me quite a while to relax my shoulders in a hasso kamae as I was forced to push my left hand up to the right ear. About the only thing noticeable is strong metsuke.
    Hyakutake Colin

    All the best techniques are taught by survivors.


    http://www.hyoho.com

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    That's a reasonable explanation of a good kendo kamae too. Relax your upper body, keep your posture straight, any tension should be in the core and lower body. It takes a long time to learn to relax.
    Neil Gendzwill
    Saskatoon Kendo Club

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