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Thread: Budolicious (cookbook)

  1. #16
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    Default Italian: Here you go!

    Originally posted by Shitoryu Dude
    Does it have to be Japanese food? I only know good Japanese restaurants like Toyoda Sushi .

    How about some great Italian recipes or cheesecake?

    Although I am only a brown belt in Karate, I am a 10 degree black belt in the Dibella-ryu system of Pizza making!

    Pizza Dough:
    • 3 1/2 cups of white All Purpose Flour
    • 1/2 Cup Semolina (pasta) Flour
    • 1 1/2 cups of warm water
    • 1 packet of yeast.
    • 1 TBL Dark Brown Sugar
    • 1 TBL Salt


    Extras include 4 cloves crushed garlic and basil.

    Put the water and sugar and yeast into a bread machine or mixer. Let stand for 5 minutes unil foamy. Put in the rest of the stuff and start your bread machine on the "dough" cycle. If you want, put the crushed garlic and dried basil in the dough before you start the machine. Optionally, in addition to the stuff mentioned, a TLB spoon of Extra virgin olive oil adds a nice flavor.

    Let the machine do it's magic.

    When done:
    • Spread out the pizza (You can use a rolling pin)
    • coat with Olive oil.
    • Slice Italian Plumb tomatoes and put ontop as if they were pepporoni.
    • Sprinkle Fresh Crushed Garlic
    • Sprinkle Basil and Oregeno
    • Chop up some fresh Mozzerella into cubes and place ontop with some parmasian cheese
    • Grind some Sea Salt
    • Anything else your heart desires


    Put in 475-500 deg oven for 15 minutes. For best results, use a pizza (bread) stone or some quarry tiles.

    Enjoy.

    Sincerly,

    Joe DiBella
    With Warmest Regards,
    Sincerely,
    Joseph M. DiBella

  2. #17
    Paul Taylor Guest

    Default

    Just a toss in here. A great place for recipes is

    http://www.foodtv.com

    I use it all the time.

    It has a search engine for 22,000 recipes.

  3. #18
    Chettaman Guest

    Thumbs up Excellent!!!!

    I posted a thread yesterday about sharing recipes. I'm definitely for the creation of the E-Budo cookbook. I'd love to hear of some great recipes for sushi and other Japanese delicacies. Indeed.

  4. #19
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    Unhappy Chicken Teriaki

    Hello All,

    I tried my hand at making chicken teriaki last night for the first time. I had asked my sensei if his wife made it, and he said to just buy the teriaki sauce and cook up the vegetables and pour it on. So I bought Kikoman Teriaki Sauce.

    I tried that. The conclusion is that Sensei probably does not cook much, and that his wife probably does not share her secrets with him.

    Anyway, I plea with you, the internet community. I need to be able to make a good chicken or salmon teriaki. My favorite restorant in my area closed down and I am going into withdrawl.

    Help... Please....

    Thanks,

    Joe
    With Warmest Regards,
    Sincerely,
    Joseph M. DiBella

  5. #20
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    Default

    When I tried this type of undertaking, I had no replies. Congrats John!

    (Perhaps it is due to your fame!)
    David Dyer
    4th Dan Black Belt
    Ro-Ken Karate Association

    It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge. - Albert Einstein

  6. #21
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    Default

    Dear Mr. Dibella,
    One reason for the lack of response to your plea for teriyaki recipes might be that there are a number of different styles and preparations for teriyaki. You don’t use the same one for chicken that you do for fish. There are also regional differences in recipes. Yakimono, or grilled dishes are also prepared differently depending on the exact method of grilling. There is even a nabeteri, or pan-grilled version.

    Here’s a basic marinade and recipe you might try:
    Equal parts sake, sugar, and shoyu, with a half part of mirin. So if you’re using 2 tablespoons sake, sugar, shoyu, go with 1 tablespoon mirin. Marinade chicken thighs at least a day and preferably overnight and actually up to a couple of days. In Tokyo and some other places, they will boil the marinade ingredients, then cool them, then use them. In rural parts of Japan, they tend not to do this. I’m betting whatever place you had teriyaki used the Tokyo method.

    What’s critical is how the chicken is grilled. If you’re using charcoal, pile the charcoal on one side of the grill bottom and place the chicken on the other side. If you are using an oven broiler, make sure the meat is about 3 to 4 inches from the source of the heat.

    There are all kinds of secrets to making good yakimono. I see a lot of chefs in Japanese restaurants here baste the meat as it’s cooking. That’s not good. The meat has to be taken off the fire for about a minute, then basted, then returned to the fire. That’s how you get that shiny “teri” glaze.

    Traditional teriyaki is quick-seared over direct heat, then very slowly grilled away from the fire, over the course of a couple of hours. Sparrows grilled whole like this are exquisite.

    There are all sorts of excellent regional variations. Down in Kyushu, they add grated ginger and red chiles to the marinade. In northern Japan, they use shottsuru, a kind of fermented fish sauce, to the marinade.

    In Nagano (and elsewhere in Japan), they have a phenomenal miso-yaki version. Use the same chicken thighs, skinned and deboned. Marinade them for a couple of days in the following: about ½ lb. of shiro-miso, 6 tablespoons of sake and 3 tablespoons of mirin. Rinse off the marinade with equal parts of mirin and sake and a half-part of shoyu. Grill as with the recipe above. Ono-licious.

    Cordially,
    Dave Lowry

  7. #22
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    Default

    Thank You So Much, Mr. Lowry. I look foward to giving this a shot.
    With Warmest Regards,
    Sincerely,
    Joseph M. DiBella

  8. #23
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    Default

    I once had this type of fish that was frozen stiff and then barbequed lightly, so that the center was chilly and soft, but the outside was crispy. It was a really big fish that they scaled and cut up after it was frozen. Anyone know anything about this? (They told me what it was called, but I somehow managed to forget!)
    -Jason Kumar

    Georgia Tech Kendo Club
    www.cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/kendoclub

  9. #24
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    Default

    Well, I like red bean moichi, I found a recipe for what I think is pretty close to what I had a at a Japan party, would ya mind including it. Thanks.


    SEKIHAN

    Makes about 6 servings
    INGREDIENTS:

    1/2 cup azuki (small red beans)
    about 3 1/2 cups water

    3 cups sweet glutinous rice (mochi gome),
    well rinsed, soaked for 1/2-1 hour, drained
    3 1/2 cups water
    1 tablespoon black dry-roasted sesame seeds
    for garnish Shiso or watercress leaf, if desired

    DIRECTIONS:

    In a medium saucepan, combine beans and water; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low; simmer 45 minutes to one hour or until beans are soft but not completely cooked. Cool to room temperature. Drain beans, reserving the liquid.
    Mix the beans, drained rice, and water with 3 tablespoons of the bean's cooking liquid. Cook in rice steamer in the usual manner.* Spread the cooked beans and rice into a decorative shallow dish or lacquer tray. Sprinkle with the sesame seeds, garnish and serve.

    * If you don't have a rice cooker, you can cook this in a pot on the stove as you would regular rice. Just use the proportion of water to rice given here, not the usual Western 2 parts water to one part rice. The rice has already been soaked, so it needs less water to cook.

    Heres the Link ot the site, where I found it. They have other japanese recipes.

    http://www.geocities.com/scocasso/mochi/mochidex.htm
    “To every man there comes a in his lifetime that special moment when he is figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing unique to him and fitted to his talent; what a tragedy if that moment finds him unprepared or unqualified for the work which would be his finest hour.”
    Sir Winston Churchill


    Matthew Gehrke

  10. #25
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    My favorite japanese dish is either kimchee pork or katsukare.
    Either one is easy enough to prepare.

    Kimchee pork is just thing slices of pork stir-fried in a pan with fresh kimchee. (hot and spicy)

    Katsukare is a deep-fried pork cutlet served on a bed of rice and smothered in spicy brown curry.
    Garnish with pickled onions...

  11. #26
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    it sounds good, but can you attach some pictures in order to illustrate???
    Cos I won't know whether my dish is as qualitied as you did

  12. #27
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hmjoe View Post
    Although I am only a brown belt in Karate, I am a 10 degree black belt in the Dibella-ryu system of Pizza making!

    Pizza Dough:
    • 3 1/2 cups of white All Purpose Flour
    • 1/2 Cup Semolina (pasta) Flour
    • 1 1/2 cups of warm water
    • 1 packet of yeast.
    • 1 TBL Dark Brown Sugar
    • 1 TBL Salt


    Extras include 4 cloves crushed garlic and basil.

    Put the water and sugar and yeast into a bread machine or mixer. Let stand for 5 minutes unil foamy. Put in the rest of the stuff and start your bread machine on the "dough" cycle. If you want, put the crushed garlic and dried basil in the dough before you start the machine. Optionally, in addition to the stuff mentioned, a TLB spoon of Extra virgin olive oil adds a nice flavor.

    Let the machine do it's magic.

    When done:
    • Spread out the pizza (You can use a rolling pin)
    • coat with Olive oil.
    • Slice Italian Plumb tomatoes and put ontop as if they were pepporoni.
    • Sprinkle Fresh Crushed Garlic
    • Sprinkle Basil and Oregeno
    • Chop up some fresh Mozzerella into cubes and place ontop with some parmasian cheese
    • Grind some Sea Salt
    • Anything else your heart desires


    Put in 475-500 deg oven for 15 minutes. For best results, use a pizza (bread) stone or some quarry tiles.

    Enjoy.

    Sincerly,

    Joe DiBella
    I've tried this one. It has good look and taste too

  13. #28
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny Fletcher View Post
    My favorite japanese dish...kimchee pork...
    My Korean aunt would be aghast that you call any dish with kimchee "Japanese."

    [Edit: and I just realized I've replied to an eight year-old post.]
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  14. #29
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    Default

    Now that E-Budo is back, any thread necromancy is good - more new posts means more hits.

    Here is a slight variation on my mum's boiled pudding recipe. Perfect with custard for Christmas dinner, but also good cold.

    2 cups plain flour
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons shortening (margarine can be used instead)
    1/2 cup sultanas
    1 teaspoon spice (mixed spice, or cinnamon and nutmeg)
    1 cup sugar
    1 cup currants
    1 dessertspoon mixed peel
    A dash of brandy or rum (optional)

    Other dried fruit can be substituted for the sultanas or currents – e.g. chopped prunes, mixed dried fruit, etc.

    2 cups milk
    1 dessertspoon bicarbonate of soda

    1. Mix dry ingredients.
    2. Heat milk. When milk comes to the boil, add the bicarbonate of soda. Take off the heat immediately – the milk will froth.
    3. Add the milk mixture to the dry ingredients and mix.
    4. Pour mixture (it’s a very “wet” mixture) into a greased pudding basin or pudding cloth and boil for at least one hour. (Check to make sure the water level doesn't drop too much – top up the boiling water when necessary.)

    To make a pudding cloth, use a large sheet of calico. Dip it in boiling water and cover it with flour. Tie it carefully so that there are NO gaps. Any gaps will ruin your pudding!! The water MUST be boiling when the pudding is put in.
    Andrew Smallacombe

    Aikido Kenshinkai

    JKA Tokorozawa

    Now trotting over a bridge near you!

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