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Tamdhu
27th June 2003, 22:06
Zut allors! (http://www.fahayek.org/index.php?article=126) I'm in love! (But married and old enough to be her dad.)

THIS kind of protesting takes real spirit and real balls. I am truly impressed.

Go girl!

Tamdhu
27th June 2003, 22:26
Sigh.

http://www.liberte-cherie.com/images/articles/Sabine.jpg

Soulend
28th June 2003, 01:04
Judging by the way she shapes her mouth, I would guess that she is quite talented.

That is...she is obviously projecting her voice so that the masses can hear her clearly. Yeah, that's the ticket. And she shaves her pits too...quite the French oddity.

TenguAteMyPuppy
28th June 2003, 01:59
I always liked Nozick and von Mises better. Hayek always seemed a little bit sensationalist.

Wait haven't I said this before?

Nevermind.

http://www.vonmises.org

Edit: Oh yeah, and I guess she's not bad looking (better than that blonde waste of flesh, Ann Coulter).

Kingu
28th June 2003, 10:33
Originally posted by Tamdhu
[BTHIS kind of protesting takes real spirit and real balls. I am truly impressed.

Go girl! [/B]


In fact, she's only telling what the majority of French people think. You could have had this kind of speech from many persons in the street.
I've heard a lot of people making such comments in the media but never heard about her...

Shitoryu Dude
29th June 2003, 00:18
The fact that it is the voice of the majority (which apparently hasn't the stones to stand up for itself in the face of the unions) is what shows real balls.

:beer:

shugyosha
29th June 2003, 09:49
funny the image peaple have of france and french,
totaly created by media :cool:

pluged

william northcote
29th June 2003, 14:23
For what the French have to put up with with strikes, it does affect the UK flight industry a lot.

The french have air superiority throughout Europe. If a plane has to go to Spain, you have to contact France air traffic control to get permission to fly. This is why when the French strike, it has a knock on effect in the UK. It can also ruin a good family holiday that some have saved for a year or more.

Dover grinds to a halt, truck drivers get annoyed as they are losing pay and the hastle it creates for the security personnel in Dover docks itself. Some drivers go to Holland or Germany and make their way back but only if they are within their alloted driving hours.

So if the French are getting angry at the strikes, the British are too.

Senjojutsu
29th June 2003, 15:17
Judging by the way she shapes her mouth, I would guess that she is quite talented.

Hello Soulend,

Talented?
...As in the way toothless hillibilies say in Appalachia:

"She's got a reeaaaal preettieee mouth"...

Concept taken from movie: Deliverance, 1972

Senjojutsu
29th June 2003, 15:36
An interesting article appeared this week in the NY Times and was posted by Matt Drudge

"Aging Europe Finds Its Pension Is Running Out"
By RICHARD BERNSTEIN (granted being in the NYT it may be fiction, however)

This article's highlights included:

A European population that is both living longer and producing fewer children is beginning to change some of the fundamentals of both social and political life.

Pension reform is the urgent political issue of the moment in Germany, Austria, France and other countries, many experts see it as a harbinger of things to come, a sign of a demographic shift with important implications not only for the welfare of retirees but also for European societies as a whole. The crucial factor is age.

In 2050 it is projected:
The median age in the United States in 2050 will be 35.4 only slightly higher than today.

In Europe, by contrast, it is expected to rise to 52.3 from its current 37.7 and therefore a fear that just as the world is entering its most competitive stage ever, Europe will be less competitive vis--vis the United States and the Asian economies.

Efforts by European governments both of the left and of the right to trim the pay-as-you-go pension system, under which the taxes paid by current workers are used to pay the pensions of current retirees. This has produced angry protests in Austria and France.

People are retiring well before the official retirement age of 60 to 65, depending on the country. Across Europe, only 39 percent of men age 55 to 65 still work, on average, elderly will be in retirement for almost as many years as they worked to earn their pensions in the first place.

Some German figures:
The fertility rate itself is 1.34 children per woman, well below the rate of 2.1 said to be needed to maintain a stable population.

Even more striking are the differences by social strata.
Fully 39 percent of the most educated German women are childless, the government's statistics show, compared with under 25 percent for women with less education.

Currently in Germany two working people support one retired person.
By 2035 or so, every worker will support one retired person.

StanLee
30th June 2003, 10:11
Oooo I like that french lass! I'd follow her anyday...

Er didn't mean it like that.

Stan:)

Soulend
30th June 2003, 14:29
Originally posted by Senjojutsu
Hello Soulend,
Talented?
...As in the way toothless hillibilies say in Appalachia:
"She's got a reeaaaal preettieee mouth"...


Yeah, something like that, except without the disturbing visual and piglike squealing. She looks like she could suck a golf ball through a garden hose.

wimp_lo
30th June 2003, 16:28
Yeah, but enough with the stinky pits!

Tamdhu
1st July 2003, 22:28
funny the image peaple have of france and french,
totaly created by media

Too true, if the sort of dissent this girl is voicing is as widespread as some have implied.

We don't hear about it in the media because the media will not push any story that casts Socialism in a bad light.

We also didn't hear much about the Iranian protests against the mullah, and I certainly didn't hear any voices of support or admiration coming from the protest community here in the US. Those activists I took the time to speak to (admittedly few) brushed it off as nothing.

So people who protest their own corrupt and tyrannical government, who put their own well being and that of their friends and family very much on the line (many friends and parents of Iranian demonstrators are now trying to locate loved ones who have been killed or 'spirited away' by their own government), are written off by the left as inconsequential. The mullahs, apparently, felt differently.

I laugh when I compare that sort of protest to the feelgood upper-middle-class self-congratulatory mass-back-patting ceremonies that took place in the West before and during the war in Iraq.