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Xenophon456
18th November 2008, 20:24
As a teenage I studied Karate and trained 7 days a week and because I was a teenager I think I could do anything to my body and it would adapt.
Now I am 38 years old and starting to study karate again. I'm in decent shape. But I notice a lot of times I go to the Dojo and I am very stiff and don't have a good session because of it.
I am trying to train Karate 5 days a week. On top of that I lift and run.
I don't want to quit any of it.
My question is simple. Do I back off on my training. Or just train even if my body is stiff or fatigued.

Woody
20th November 2008, 01:06
Listen to your body.

morpheus
21st November 2008, 17:46
If you plan on training for a lifetime you have to train smart. Your body needs opportunities to rebound from the exercise you put it through. I have trained budo for the last 7 1/2 years doing 3 - 6 days per week. I currently have injuries to both my shoulders that is now limiting my ability to train and my ability to move.

With that said training with and through pain is part of training a martial way. Only you can know for certain when your body is to the point that you are hurting yourself.

Jeff

tgace
22nd November 2008, 19:43
Sometimes the solution can be simply changing the volume, intensity and frequency of what you are curently doing. Another solution is to change your routine. I cycle my focus throughout the year. From your initial post it is difficult to determine if your issue is overtraining or simply being sore from new exercise. If its just "new exercise soreness" work through it. If its joint pain or chronic, then ease off.

DDATFUS
22nd November 2008, 21:19
Best advice I can give you is talk to your sensei. Since he's presumably been doing this for a while, he should be able to give you better advice than we can. It might be that your stiffness has less to do with how much you are training and more with how you train-- you might be holding your muscles tensely, for instance, in a way that makes them more likely to stiffen up afterwards. As an experienced instructor who can watch you train, your sensei can pinpoint these problems and help you adjust them. He can also evaluate your overall physical condition and calculate the specific effect the training regime that he teaches will have on it.

No matter how experienced someone on this board might be, we can't see your condition or watch you move, and we don't know what the particular classes that you train in are like. We're just guessing, but your sensei should know.

Xenophon456
22nd November 2008, 21:38
I appreciate all of your responses. I have made this weekend one of rest although I expect this to be a continued battle between my body and my ambition.

Kukan99
24th November 2008, 19:24
William,

In order for your training to become sustainable, the high level effort you put in must cycled with rest and recovery. Growth and improvement happen during the rest periods, not during the effort phase. If your goal is to continuously improve in your karate training, rest and recovery are paramount.
Also, implementing a daily joint mobility session would go a long way to aiding recovery and protecting your joints from injury.

Hope that helps!

Xenophon456
24th November 2008, 22:02
William,

Also, implementing a daily joint mobility session would go a long way to aiding recovery and protecting your joints from injury.

Hope that helps!

Thank you for your help. Please this may sound like a stupid question.

I already try and stretch daily. Is that what you mean by a joint mobility session? If it is not please describe or direct me somewhere that give more information so that I can design a joint mobility session or copy someone elses.

Kukan99
25th November 2008, 14:15
I already try and stretch daily. Is that what you mean by a joint mobility session?

No. Joint mobility and stretching are definitely not the same thing. Stretching actually does very little to aid in recovery since it is really just moving against the tissue in one direction. Joint mobility, on the other hand, involves moving each joint through its full range of motion. This is the only way your joints receive nutrition and lubrication – by movement. Joint mobility also acts as a way of removing the “rust” in the form of calcium deposits and other adhesions from your joints, washing out toxins, and freeing up your range of motion.