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yamatodamashii
23rd June 2000, 21:22
I was wondering if any of the other posters here had information about Tendai Buddhism? Also, I understand that there is a "renegade" sect affiliated with Van Donk sensei's ABD?

Joseph Svinth
24th June 2000, 00:03
Around 570 CE, the Tien Tai school of Theraveda Buddhist moving meditations developed in China; its most famous teacher was the third Patriarch, Chih-i and its principle scripture was the Lotus Sutra. This system was known for its enthusiastic use of the sudden realization method of enlightenment, and when introduced into Japan during the ninth century as the Tendai school, it became particularly popular with the monks of Mount Hiei.

For an introduction, go to the Encyclopedia Britannica at
http://www.britannica.com/ where you will discover that there is both Tendai Buddhist and Tendai Shinto. And if you are truly inspired, then try http://www2.uncwil.edu/iabs/vl/

Terry Dukes has written about this too. Between us, I wouldn't trust his interpretation nearly as far as Britannica's, but the folks teaching their idiosyncratic MA may give him more credence than I do.

jion
25th June 2000, 23:04
No, the Tendai Sect is in no fashion related to this gentleman. Should you wish to have a look @ our English pages, I'd encourage you to go to: http://www.tendai-lotus.org

Just an aside, please note that the Tendai school and it's parent sect, the Chinese T'ien-t'ai sect are both Mahayana Buddhist schools, not Hinayana sect.

Jion Prosser
Tendai Lotus Teachings
Nagoya, Japan

[Edited by Jion on 06-25-2000 at 06:07 PM]

John Lindsey
26th June 2000, 00:20
Welcome to e-budo Jion! Glad to see you here. I have had some very basic training in Tendai-shu with Reverend Jikai and enjoyed every bit of it.

If you didn't have your own forum at your website, I would invite you to have one here as well. The offer will always be good.........

yamatodamashii
26th June 2000, 02:20
Jion!

You may remember me--I'm the US Marine (Kenshi) who contacted you a few months ago about the lay priesthood. Sorry I've been out of contact; I've been taking care of some other obligations first. I was trying to get more info about the SATI thing we had talked about.

[Edited by yamatodamashii on 06-25-2000 at 09:23 PM]

jion
26th June 2000, 23:07
John and Others-

No, I think having an alternate board here dedicated to Tendai and some notions regarding spiritual development within Budo might be a good idea. I'm sure you all can add some new insights and remind me how much I've forgotten. :)

Shall look forward to it!

Jion Prosser
Tendai Lotus Teachings
http://www.tendai-lotus.org
Nagoya, Japan

jion
11th July 2000, 05:20
Wonderful to see genuine interest in the Tendai Teachings. For the time being, I felt it best to hold off on overseeing a specific board on Tendai here on the E-Budo site as there have been some misconceptions about the supposed connection between Tendai and martial arts. I would invite you to hop on board the E-groups Tendai List (http://www.egroups.com/subscribe/tendai) which might be a better medium.

As John has reminded me, E-Budo is a site dedicated not only to Budo per say but Japanese culture in general. Therefore, we might be able to invest a bit of quality time here speaking of Tendai in relation to the culture here in Japan.

Yamantaka
15th July 2000, 10:15
Originally posted by jion
John and Others-

No, I think having an alternate board here dedicated to Tendai and some notions regarding spiritual development within Budo might be a good idea. I'm sure you all can add some new insights and remind me how much I've forgotten. :)

Shall look forward to it!

Jion Prosser
Tendai Lotus Teachings
http://www.tendai-lotus.org
Nagoya, Japan

Mr. Jion,

I know this isn't exactly a topic on religion but perhaps you can help me. I've always heard that the term "DO" meant "a way", "a road", "an avenue", but recently a friend of mine gave me the following interpretation:

"Unfortunately, the ancient characters are our only link with the original
meaning of oriental pictographs. They were born of objective
representations of things and animals simplified, after centuries, to make
them easy to write. I've attached an analysis of the ancient ideograph for
DO(TAO) with its pictorial representation.
The first component is the figure of 3 horizontal lines, representing
the CHIEN trigram from the I Ching. This trigram, represented by those 3
unbroken lines, symbolizes Heaven, Creative Power, Action and completely
Yang forces.
The second component is a representation of a seated man, with
outstretched hands, as in prayer. It symbolizes a meditative, contemplative,
patient
posture.
Those two componentes, united, symbolize a great inner movement, because
of the sitted, still, man. It's a character used to symbolize "action".
The third component is represented by 3 wavy lines. They symbolize
flowing water, fluidity. This is a very important element in Taoism, meaning
the constant flux of the Universe. It's flexible and overcomes all
obstacles, by avoidance or absortion.
The last element is formed by the joining of an eye with a vertical
line. It's the symbol for "looking up", that is, the spiritual vision that
transcends the material universe.
Those last two, when united, mean "leader" or "leadership". The leader
is one that possesses a great flexibility and is always looking beyond the
common man's perception. That's why he is followed by other people.
By reading the whole of the ideograph :
DO symbolizes a search (action) for a transcendental vision, since the
only constant in the Universe is CHANGE. Also, it means that this vision
lies inside human beings, but also outside (the ancient metaphor that the
macrocosm reflects the microcosm). O DO ou o TAO symnbolizes, basically, a
search, never an end and that's why it's called a "WAY".
As said by the taoist philosopher CHUANG TSE : "After studying a few
hundred years, we may finally reach the beginning of the Way".
Can you clarify things for me ?