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Thread: The future of weapon arts in the modern world

  1. #1
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    Hello Obata Sensei

    I do not wish to be disrespectful and apologise if this post would seem to be.
    I would ask what you consider to be the future of weapon based arts in the modern world, when we cannot carry or use weapons in the street or in our normal life.
    I have not studied any weapon based systems, with the exception of a short time practicing Kendo, and would think it is very difficult to use any weapon based system in a practical situation, but I can see that the application of ideas may be possible.

    I feel that there is a place for weapon based systems in martial arts and would like to hear your opinions.

    With Thanks
    Steve Williams

    Harrow Branch.
    Shorinji Kempo UK.
    www.ukskf.org




  2. #2
    Obata T Guest

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    If you think about Budo, there are two main ideas.

    One is train your body, fight in competitions and win. The other is learning about human spirit, Bushido, and Harmony and not caring for competitions.

    In modern days, empty handed martial arts such as Aikido, Judo, Karate-do, and Shorinji Kempo etc. have become quite popular. Judo and Karate's main point has become competition these days, but there are still some dojos who teach more traditionally.

    Winning competitions is "Sho no Budo".

    In "Dai no Budo", you think about your whole life instead of little moments. I know many who have become winners in competitions, but ended up committing suicide.

    A Samurai's martial art is very good; there are no unnecessary fights (only in battles). Their spirit was to train themselves, care about their families, make people's lives better, and make their living place better.

    Since you're learning Shorinji Kempo, I think you understand this concept.

    There is Dai no Budo and Sho no Budo - both in cases of empty hand and weapon arts. However, the purpose of learning a martial art is not to win in fights or win competitions.

    I teach both Shinkendo and Aikibujutsu. The Budo I think of is what we call "Chudo Seishin"...meaning it's not too much harmony, not too much fighting, etc.

    Our budo is like a plane, the wings are equally balanced when it is flying.


    International Shinkendo Federation,

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