Likes Likes:  2
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 55

Thread: Ono-ha Itto-ryu

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Kurihara, Miyagi-ken, Japan
    Posts
    210
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M. McPherson View Post
    The first, under the heading 詰座抜刀 (tsumezabatto), contains 17 kata, and as the 座 might imply, all seem to start from a seated position.
    The next group, titled 立合抜刀 (tachiaibatto) is a set of 5 kata - probably the ones Mr. Covington was referring to - that start in a standing position. . . . That could mean that OHIR has its own batto techniques, but as I'm reading it, the article doesn't mention *where* the two sets come from .,
    The tachiaibattojutsu set is demonstrated by Sasamori Takemi and an uchidachi whose name I don't remember on the Ono-ha Itto Ryu video from the Nihon Budokan's Nihon no Kobudo series. To me as an outsider it looked like all the other higher-level kata demonstrated except that they used habiki and the kata started with swords in saya. And the habiki were the same size as the bokuto used earlier and not the size of those used in Shin Muso Hayashizaki Ryu.
    Kent Enfield
    Kentokuseisei

  2. #32
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA USA
    Posts
    2,570
    Likes (received)
    44

    Default 2011 San Diego Seminar Review

    Hi guys,

    Just thought I'd offer a quick review of the OIR seminar with Sasamori Takemi Soke and Hirata Tomihiko Shihan held in San Diego last weekend. Sasamori Soke is the 17th generation headmaster OIR, and this was the second time he has held an open seminar in the US in recent decades, the last one being in 2008. In both cases the host group was the "Kokusai Nippon Budokai", headed by Shimabukuro Masayuki Sensei (Jikishinkai).

    To begin with, I have to echo what I've heard some others say about KNBK/Jikishinkai hosted seminars: it was very well organized and well coordinated. To begin with, information about local hotels and eateries were offered with the announcement flyer. That is a big plus for those not familiar with the area. Following registration, several emails were sent out detailing where to park, how much it will cost, and links to a campus map. During the seminar, a Japanese-speaking member of their group walked around with a microphone and translated instruction, questions, and answers to/from Japanese and English. A seminar packet was issued to participants upon arrival that contained a brief history of the art, instructor bio, photographs from the previous event, and a list of the kamae/kumitachi (with translations) with room below to write notes if desired. I noticed almost everyone using them to write down notes during breaks. When it came time to take a group photo, the hosts provided an organized way for participant groups to take their own group photos with the instructors, with an offer to email them to each group after the seminar. Lunch and waters were provided for lunch, which allowed us to eat and be ready to train again within the hour allotted for lunch. And finally, the Jikishinkai brought with them loaner bokuto in case anyone did not have an appropriate weapon to use. In short, a lot of effort was put into making sure that the participants were taken care of. Big Kudos to the Jikishinkai / KNBK for a great job organizing the event!

    Training was in the form of a 3-day open seminar. Although most of the +/- 50 participants were members of the Jikishinkai from around the US, there were a number of people who flew in from all over to attend this as well. Based on the group debrief with the instructors at the end, it sounded like everyone had a great time and learned a lot.

    I was surprised at how much power Sasamori Soke could generate! Sasamori Soke is around 78 years old, and is of small height and build. Pairing up with him with the intention of being polite was a bad idea. He was a real pleasure to spend time with, and among other things, was EXTREMELY knowledgeable about pretty much anything related to swordsmanship.

    Hirata Sensei is/was a Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department homicide detective, and is a 7th Dan Kyoshi in Kendo (according to ca. 2006 internet postings). Hirata Sensei is 69 years old, but very agile and energetic. He lead most the training and assisted in making corrections. It was nice to have someone else there with so much skill and experience.

    Training included etiquette, kamae, the first five kumitachi, and an additional kumitachi from much deeper in the curriculum. Most the training was paired using wooden bokuto, and the instruction was very pretty detailed. We trained for 5 hours a day with a one hour lunch break in the middle, so we were able to get a fair amount of practice in.

    One of the biggest things that struck me about this seminar though was how polite, thoughtful and gracious the members of the Jikishinkai group in particular were. I met Shimabukuro Sensei many years ago briefly, but did not realize what a nice guy he was until now. He walked up to me several times to chat and make sure we were benefiting from the training. During a break, he called myself and my partner over to work with the instructors privately, and continued to look out for us in other ways throughout our entire stay down there. There was a group dinner offered after training on Saturday, and the handful of us that waited until the end were treated to a Q&A session with Sasamori Soke. He made several sketches while he explained concepts to us all, then signed them and gave them to Carl Long Sensei as a gift. Shimabukuro Sensei then asked to borrow them back from Long Sensei so he could make xerox copies that night for all the other participants. I really was blown away with how nice he and everyone else was there, and I've been to A LOT of seminars over the years.

    In any event, the training was great, and I had a good time meeting and crossing swords with several people whom I've either only corresponded with on the internet, or met briefly in passing. I'd like to again thank Shimabukuro Sensei for all his efforts and generosity, as well as Carl Long Sensei and Erik Tracy in particular for all their courtesy and hard efforts. It was money and time well spent.

    For those of you who have been curious about Ono-ha Itto-ryu, you just missed a valuable chance to sample it here within the states. But then again, a bigger group would have meant less attention for those of us that did go!

    Regards,
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default

    Nathan,

    Sounds like a great time was had by all. I was lucky enough to make the NJ seminar a few years ago and have to agree with everything you said. I hope Sasamori sensei makes it back east again. I'd like to train under him again one day.
    Best regards,
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA USA
    Posts
    2,570
    Likes (received)
    44

    Default

    Hey Chris,

    Yeah, you were in a couple of photos from the 2008 event that they reproduced in the handout! If Sasamori Sensei comes out to the East Coast next time, I'll probably come out for it. Maybe we'll finally have a chance to get together and watch some "bad budo" videos or something.

    BTW, "Old Bay" is awesome!! Thanks...

    Regards,
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

  5. #35
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Texas
    Posts
    2,000
    Likes (received)
    125

    Default

    Thanks for the write-up Nathan.
    I had very much hoped to go to that, but couldn't make it fit in with what was going on at work. I've had the good fortune to meet up with the Jikishinkai folks on several occasions, and they've always been very friendly and generous with their time and effort.
    Paul Smith
    "Always keep the sharp side and the pointy end between you and your opponent"

  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    124
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Nathan,
    Thank you indeed for the kind words! I'll make sure Shimabukuro Sensei sees them.

    Glad you had a rewarding experience - I know I did. I'm still pouring over my notes and making annotations and additions before they evaporate out of my head.

    We were all indeed very lucky for this opportunity to train directly with Sasamori Soke and Hirata Sensei (did I hear correctly that he is now hachidan kendo - which right there by itself is humbling enough - very difficult to achieve that level).

    I thought that the method of instruction was extremely effective - with Hirata Sensei's demonstration and explanation of the techniques and Sasamori Soke's additional explanations/explorations of the subtleties and finer points of heiho.

    That we spent so much time on the basics of etiquette and kihon just drove home Hirata Sensei's emphasis of a good foundation on which to build correct technique.

    Now to take what Sasamori Soke and Hirata Sensei taught and shared with us and put it to practice in the dojo and in life.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA USA
    Posts
    2,570
    Likes (received)
    44

    Default

    Hi Erik,

    Yeah, good point. I know I've learned to appreciate the value of good kihon over the years. It seems to always be emphasized in martial arts, but many new to the arts end up rushing through them to get to the advanced techniques. Big mistake.

    I didn't mind the speed of the instruction. Detailed instructions on basics are a good thing. Practicing *correctly* is probably the most important part of practicing anyway.

    See you next time,
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    120
    Likes (received)
    3

    Default

    Erik,

    Good to see this feed-back on this exceptional event.

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Tracy View Post
    We were all indeed very lucky for this opportunity to train directly with Sasamori Soke and Hirata Sensei
    Just to let you know that I was also very happy to be part of this lucky group in San Diego.

    What started as a journey with limited objectives, just trying to improve my sword skills in order to bring the kumidachi in my bojutsu to a higher level, without expecting anything else, turned in to a very warm and pleasant experience, where I had to chance to observe and train with exceptional teachers like Sasamori Soke and Hirata Sensei.
    Although a seminar of 3 days is not enough to get introduced into a system, it was certainly the ideal forum to get inspired. The time spent on the basis (kihon, etiquette) was highly appreciated and made this seminar very exceptional.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Scott View Post
    I have to echo what I've heard some others say about KNBK/Jikishinkai hosted seminars: it was very well organized and well coordinated.
    I also think that you guys can really organize these kinds of seminars very well and this can serve as an example for others. Although the training was very serious, the overall atmosphere remained warm and pleasant.

    My gratitude goes to you, other members of KNBK/Jikishinkai and of course Shimabukuro Masayuki Sensei. Hope to see more of this in the future.

    Guy
    Guy Buyens
    Hontai Yoshin Ryu (本體楊心流)
    BELGIAN BRANCH http://www.hontaiyoshinryu.be/

  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    520
    Likes (received)
    72

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Scott View Post
    If Sasamori Sensei comes out to the East Coast next time, I'll probably come out for it. Maybe we'll finally have a chance to get together and watch some "bad budo" videos or something.

    BTW, "Old Bay" is awesome!! Thanks...
    Sounds like a plan! Bad budo videos are always funny.

    People in Maryland and Northern VA put Old Bay on almost everything. I love it on wings and fries myself. Good stuff!
    Christopher Covington

    Daito-ryu aikijujutsu
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryu heiho

    All views expressed here are my own and don't necessarily represent the views of the arts I practice, the teachers and people I train with or any dojo I train in.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Germany and Singapore
    Posts
    4
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Thanks for the write-up! It's always nice to hear about other seminars, especially when the art is one I train myself. Too bad the US is so far away for me - but then again, at the moment I am located closer to Japan than to the US, so I might go there next year.

    Like you said, I'm always surprised at the power Soke can generate, and the ease with which he does Kumitachi at full speed and power.

    Soke said at a seminar last year that Hirata-sensei just achieved his kendo hachidan...

    Best regards,
    Andreas Hauser
    Andreas Hauser, Member Onoha Ittoryu study group in Munich, Germany

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    14
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    I met Mr. Rodney Uhler, President of NineCirclesUSA and a senior student of Okabayashi Shogen sensei, at a seminar recently. He told me that he received a Menkyo in Ono-ha Itto Ryu from Okabayashi sensei while living in Japan. Okabayashi sensei received his Menkyo from Takeda Tokimune Soke. Mr. Uhler told me that he is willing to travel to teach seminars.

    Best regards,
    Michael Zartman

  12. #42
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA USA
    Posts
    2,570
    Likes (received)
    44

    Default

    Just to be clear, the "Sokaku-den" OIR curriculum is not identical to the OIR curriculum. Tokimune's Sokaku-den OIR consisted of (4) sections. The exact number of kata and curriculum appears to vary slightly depending on the instructor:

    1) Kendo kata (10 kata) - standardized kata created to supplement Kendo
    2) Gogyo no kata (5 kata) - pre-kendo kata devised by Takano Sasaburo
    3) Ono-ha itto-ryu (120 kata) - Odachi (43 kata); Kodachi (6 kata); Aikodachi (6 kata); Habiki (11 kata); Sanju (2 kata); Kojo Gokui Goten (5 kata); & Tachiai Batto (5 kata).
    4) Daito-ryu battojutsu (5 kata) - kata claimed to have been passed down by Sokaku.

    Of these four sections, only one contains Ono-ha itto-ryu kata. I don't remember how big the Hakuho-ryu OIR curriculum is as taught by Okabayashi Sensei.

    I'm sure the Sokaku-den OIR contains valuable teachings, but I think its important to clarify it as "Sokaku-den" to avoid confusion with other Itto-ryu curriculums.

    Regards,
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

  13. #43
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Melissa, TX
    Posts
    3,162
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default

    So, other than the three other sections from your list (1, 2, and 4) are the Ono-ha Ittō-ryū kata similar between the main line and Sōkaku-den?
    George Kohler

    Genbukan Kusakage dojo
    Dojo-cho

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    E. Lansing
    Posts
    5
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    I do not hang out in these forums very often, but I thought I would respond to this one and clear up any confusion. The full name of our sword art is Aizu-Han Kei Ono-Ha Itto Ryu Sokaku Den, meaning the Aizu clan version of Ono Ha Itto Ryu as taught by Sokaku. We are not the main line of OIR and have never claimed to be so.

    1) We do start beginners with the kendo kata; however, we teach pre-war versions of the kata. They are much more dynamic then present day kendo kata, and contain Itto Ryu principles, whereas most of the Itto Ryu principles have been watered-down in the present day kendo kata.

    2) Once beginners reach an acceptable level in the kendo kata, we teach the gogyo no kata. The gogyo no kata instill graceful sword/body movements. We teach these 15 kata first, giving the beginner the skills required to learn Itto Ryu. Since in modern-day dojo keppan is no longer required, students can be evaluated before being taught and trusted with Itto Ryu techniques.

    3) The count of kata is incorrect as stated above; however, an outsider to Itto Ryu would not know this because of the unique way in which Itto Ryu numbers the kata. Yes, there are 43 named kata in the odachi kumitachi, but sometimes a single named kata is counted as two kata. For example, hitotsugachi is one kata, but futatsugachi is counted as two kata, and hari-aiba is counted as three kata. The odachi kata mentioned above actually total 60, but they are divided into two groups: 50 katsujin ken and 10 satsujin ken. The Hi-kotachi (not just kotachi) total 9. The Ai-kotachi total 8. Habiki is correct at 11. Sanju is 1 long kata used for ceremonial purposes. Kojo Gokuki Goten and Tachiai Batto are both correct at 5 each. We also study the Hoshato containing 9+ kata, and the Taryu Gachi containing 11 kata. This way of counting the kata is the same as mainline OIR, as described by Sasamori Junzo in the Itto Ryu Gokui book.

    One way to learn about the differences between the mainline OIR and Sokaku Den Itto Ryu would be to invite me to teach a seminar.

    Sincerely,

    Rodney Uhler

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Scott View Post
    Just to be clear, the "Sokaku-den" OIR curriculum is not identical to the OIR curriculum. Tokimune's Sokaku-den OIR consisted of (4) sections. The exact number of kata and curriculum appears to vary slightly depending on the instructor:

    1) Kendo kata (10 kata) - standardized kata created to supplement Kendo
    2) Gogyo no kata (5 kata) - pre-kendo kata devised by Takano Sasaburo
    3) Ono-ha itto-ryu (120 kata) - Odachi (43 kata); Kodachi (6 kata); Aikodachi (6 kata); Habiki (11 kata); Sanju (2 kata); Kojo Gokui Goten (5 kata); & Tachiai Batto (5 kata).
    4) Daito-ryu battojutsu (5 kata) - kata claimed to have been passed down by Sokaku.

    Of these four sections, only one contains Ono-ha itto-ryu kata. I don't remember how big the Hakuho-ryu OIR curriculum is as taught by Okabayashi Sensei.

    I'm sure the Sokaku-den OIR contains valuable teachings, but I think its important to clarify it as "Sokaku-den" to avoid confusion with other Itto-ryu curriculums.

    Regards,

  15. #45
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA USA
    Posts
    2,570
    Likes (received)
    44

    Default

    Mr. Uhler,

    Thanks for clarifying the Hakuho-ryu Sokaku-den OIR curriculum. The phrasing and kata numbers I posted came from a combination of the Daito-ryu.com webpage (Daitokai organization) and Mr. Certa's book (Daitokai organization). Like I said, I had a feeling the curriculum would not be the same between the various groups teaching Sokaku-den.

    As far as the differences between mainline and Sokaku-den, I haven't seen enough of Sokaku-den to form an opinion. But supposedly Takeda Sokaku made variations and modifications to some of the kata, which Tokimune claims to have been learned, then passed down as "Sokaku-den".

    Regards,
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •