Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: did anyone know atemi waza Techniques ?

  1. #1
    ABRN Guest

    Lightbulb did anyone know atemi waza Techniques ?

    can anyone explain to me about this techniques ?

    are this traditional techniq ?

    can anyone show me the demo, please ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    503
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    What in particular are you referring to? Atemi Waza covers pretty much anything that is a strike. If you're referring to formal techniques in a normal Judo environment they only tend to show up in the Goshin Jitsu kata (there may be some in Kime no Kata, I can't remember)
    Rob Thornton

  3. #3
    ABRN Guest

    Default did anyone know atemi waza Techniques ?

    i mean all atemi waza Techniques

    can you explain to me

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    503
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Rob Thornton

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,010
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    well looking through some of the older books about judo besides the judo "tricks" there is mention of atemi-waza

    Is atemi-waza something that was originally part of Kano's judo and was slowly taken out or did judo have no atemi at all (from the beginning)?
    Rogier van der Peijl

    REAL SCOTSMEN WEAR KILTS because sheep can hear a zipper at 500 yards!

    Originally posted by Cady Goldfield
    Ah, what a cutie, Rogier. I'll bet a lot of ladies in Netherlands are mourning because you are out of circulation now!

  6. #6
    MarkF Guest

    Default

    There are three basic areas of trainign, nage waza, katame, waza, and atemi waza, and in completely traditional schools, in that order.

    Atemi is not something you will find in randori, though the first punch you receive as uke (and sometimes as tori) will be from your face hitting someone's fist. It happens and it is much better to know how to evade them than to cry and "tell" on the person, but Rob is right, you will find them when you do kata, those which contain them.

    Kime no kata, is they are learned in any particular order has more punching kicking and striking than any other form. Your entire body can be a weapon so don't think of atemi as simply hitting and kicking. It isn't. You can use the entire body as a "crashing in" type of atemi, elbows, knees, all sides and the top of the head can be used as a weapon at any given time.

    Goshin Jutsu is really more of a system still under development than a kata, but learning "pieces:" of this kata can be effective, as are pieces of other kata.

    Abraham Nugroho,

    Even though your name is in your profile, the rules ask you to sign your posts. Since you may have missed that, I'll let it go since it appears in your profile, but next time your posts will be edited and/or deleted, OK? Thanks.
    *****

    BTW: Atemi is a very long and difficult area of study, and it isn't at all like the striking of karate, even wado-ryu, while a softer style, still is very different. The atemi-waza of judo is rarely used to finish a fight, it is used on the way to finishing a fight. As an example, think of it as another manner of off-balancing the opponent. There are exceptions, but so much has been lost little is used for anything but self-defense and mild to moderate contact. You should be able to find some books on it somewhere. The book "Kodokan Judo" touches on atemi and contains some forms which you can pracice alone. It does say it was written by Jigoro Kano, but in reality, it is written by committee, using some of Kano's text, teaching, and his unique kihon. It is mostly a how-to book meant to take one through the basics of judo, from beginning to the most advanced. It is NOT meant to teach, but you may get something from it.


    Mark

  7. #7
    ABRN Guest

    Default atemi waza techniques ??????

    did anyone know that some judo dojo

    still teach this techiques ?

    can someone show this techiques

    with some pic?






    Abraham Nugroho

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    590
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Just learn some Muaythai or boxing instead.
    Hector Gomez
    "Todo es Bueno"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,862
    Likes (received)
    90

    Default Pictures

    Ed Boyd

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Atlanta - USA
    Posts
    712
    Likes (received)
    6

    Default

    He killed the guy from that Star Wars lightsaber farce!

    At least he looks contented as he expires - dreaming of French Fries...
    “Happy place, happy place, happy place.”
    Doug Walker
    Completely cut off both heads,
    Let a single sword stand against the cold sky!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,862
    Likes (received)
    90

    Default

    Originally posted by Walker
    He killed the guy from that Star Wars lightsaber farce!
    ...
    Oh my God, he did!
    Ed Boyd

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,010
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    I think we're actually looking for some serious answers here....
    Rogier van der Peijl

    REAL SCOTSMEN WEAR KILTS because sheep can hear a zipper at 500 yards!

    Originally posted by Cady Goldfield
    Ah, what a cutie, Rogier. I'll bet a lot of ladies in Netherlands are mourning because you are out of circulation now!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,862
    Likes (received)
    90

    Default

    Originally posted by Rogier
    I think we're actually looking for some serious answers here....
    OK, something more serious though probably not anymore useful.

    My teacher taught us atemi. It was good basic striking techniques. Stuff with high utility value. We didn't do it a whole lot. Maybe once a month or so. We also did No-Jacket training once in a while. There is atemi in the kata. My teacher taught us kata once we reached Brown belt. He learned his Judo in the 50's and 60's and continued to hone his skills over the next 40 years. His teacher was Wey Seng Kim who finished 3rd in the 1960 World Championships. So even though his Judo came from a teacher that valued competition highly the syllabus was well balanced regardless. My guess is that this is because that WAS Judo.

    The few Judo schools I've trained with since moving away from my old teacher don't have this balance. These teachers are from a younger generation I don't know if this is a material observation or just coincidence. They didn't spend time on atemi or kata.

    IMO, Just about everything I see that is claims to be Jujutsu that isn't Koryu or an Aiki based creation looks just like 'old-time' Judo to me, except it seems to be often minus randori practice. I really like old time Judo. But new Judo is good also. The differences are all just time allocation issues, what’s important is the brotherhood.

    You just got to find the best teacher within a do-able distance of you. If he teaches you atemi then you will learn atemi. If he don't then you won't. If you want to learn to hit stuff find a karate teacher or Muay Thai teacher and take a couple months of lessons. Blunt force trauma isn’t a real complicated concept but there are a few things you need to know and it requires a little bit work but taking your palm and smashing some dude nose flat across is face is pretty simple conceptually, I think.

    I don't know if this is info is any more useful than Unleashing the Tiger.
    Ed Boyd

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Santa Barbara CA
    Posts
    258
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    It's important to understand that atemiwaza involves more than just basic striking techniques (which are properly called atewaza). Here's the way you go about it:

    FIRST--You study Ate Dokoro -- the way to form, use, and condition the various anatomical weapons. You learn e.g. how to form a fist, and which part(s) of the fist makes impact, and sometimes how to go about conditioning that part of the anatomy so as to use it more effectively. The weapons used include various parts of the fist, hand, palm, fingers, elbows, knees, head, and various parts of the foot.

    SECOND-- You study Ate Waza -- you learn the body mechanics involved in delivering an effective thrust/strike/kick, first statically, then in motion, then with moving targets.
    The methods are divided into Ude Ate (punches and other strikes that employ the arm and hand), Ashi Ate (kicks and strikes with the knee or foot), and Atama Ate (headbutts).
    Many of the atewaza are found in the Joshi Goshin-ho and the Seiryoku Zen'Yo Kokumin Taiiku no Kata.

    THIRD--You study Jintai Kyusho -- the location of the body's vulnerable anatomical targets. This knowledge has often been considered "secret."

    Many people stop at this point, believing they have learned atemi. They are mistaken. The critical fourth step involves learning VERY SPECIFICALLY which weapon to use to attack which target, and what direction/angle/depth is called for. In other words, all three steps (weapon + target + atewaza) are carefully tied together, so that the result is "Maximally Efficient."

    The separate elements (weapon/target/strike) are normally trained via drills. The atemi themselves are mostly practiced in kata.

    There are atemi in almost all of the Kodokan kata (except maybe Katame- and Go-no-Sen-).
    Yours in Judo,

    Brian P. Griffin

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •