Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 44

Thread: Anyone see ...?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    6,225
    Likes (received)
    117

    Default

    Originally posted by Daniel san
    I read somewhere that they invented a special effects technique for this film. It involves making say an arm from the inside out. This fake arm can then be cut at any point with a real sword. Thus, you end up with a visible cross section from marrow to skin. Did I dream this?
    I heard about that, too.

    If they used it, that scene must have ended on the cutting room floor.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Ft. Laud., Fl.
    Posts
    605
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default Re: Re: Just came from it...

    Originally posted by ChrisMoon
    Bush Jr. was a qualified F-102 fighter pilot. He was still flying in them until the late 80s or even early 90s.
    Yeah. An entering score of 25, the absolute lowest possible for admission, and he gets into the Guard ahead of 100,000 other applicants (during the Vietnam draft.) Ugh.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846
    Don J. Modesto
    Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    ------------------------
    http://theaikidodojo.com/

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Ft. Laud., Fl.
    Posts
    605
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default Re: Just came from it...

    Originally posted by Nyuck3X
    I brought my wife to the attention that when they spoke about
    the bokken(?), they referred to them as swords and not just sticks
    because they can be just as lethal.
    I noticed that. Ujio tells Cruise to put down his "KATANA" when he's holding a BOKKEN. I thought it was a typical Hollywood infelicity (less egregious than the spinning back kicks during swordplay, actually.)
    Don J. Modesto
    Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    ------------------------
    http://theaikidodojo.com/

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Ft. Laud., Fl.
    Posts
    605
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default Re: Re: Not Tom

    Originally posted by David T Anderson
    It could refer to either Watanabe or Cruise's character...or it could refer to all the Samurai in the story collectively. This may be the closest thing to subtlety in the entire film...
    The story was so close to history, I wonder why they didn't just use the real names. I don't know that history all that well, but Katsumoto would be Saigo Takamori. I wonder who they meant Omura to be--Katsu Kaishu? (Not a very flattering portrayal of one of Japan's saviors, if so...)
    Don J. Modesto
    Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    ------------------------
    http://theaikidodojo.com/

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    31
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Originally posted by Yagyu Kenshi
    Well, remember that in the story Algren was already a veteran of the Civil War and numerous Indian Campaigns, he was an accomplished sabre and bayonet fighter, etc. He was already a warrior, just from a different "ryu."
    Also, it's not like Algren was training like 3x or 4x week like some of us do.
    He was "training" every day for a few months and probably with more "intent" than most of us as well. Not entirely unbelivable that he reached such a level of proficiency.

    But, I agree about those bokken hits. Oh damn, time to get fixed up by the pretty lady again!

    It was enjoyable to say the least.
    Arigato Gozaimasu.
    Sherman Chow

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Palo Alto, Ca, USA
    Posts
    1,324
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default

    Ummmmm.....spinning back kicks?
    Earl Hartman

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    6,225
    Likes (received)
    117

    Default Katana or Bokken

    Originally posted by don
    I noticed that. Ujio tells Cruise to put down his "KATANA" when he's holding a BOKKEN. I thought it was a typical Hollywood infelicity.
    My old sensei, when speaking about a specific type of sword or weapon, would use specific terms like bokken, iaito, tachi, katana, wakazashi, etc.

    But during training he would always use the term katana, no matter what we were using at the time. Bokken, Iaito, Shinken -- all were "Katana" during keiko. He told us to always think of the bokken as a sword, and to respect it as such.

    His sensei, during a seminar I attended, did exactly the same thing, and he was a VERY traditional older Japanese gentleman.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    114
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default The Spinning Backkick of Doom

    Recently documentation has come to light concerning the mysterious origin of the spinning back kick.

    Originally, the spinning back kick was used by certain Native American tribes to stun buffalo. Native American warriors would prove their bravery by sneaking up on unwitting buffalo and striking hard against the jaw with a spinning back kick.

    American soldiers on the frontier, in awe of the mystical and noble Native American warriors learned the spinning back kick technique. American advisors to the early Imperial forces brought the spinning back kick to Japan, where they used the unconventional low-percentage technique to surprise the exponents of several traditional Japanese ryu.

    As the Japanese were (and are) quick to adopt effective foreign practices, several ryy adopted the spinning back kick. However, due to the decisive and devastating effect of the technique, the headmasters chose to teach it only as okuden, which means that only a few, dedicated students could learn it. This explains the lack of documentation (until now) of the koryu spinning back kick. Absensce, as Donald Rumsfeld so eloquently explained, is proof of existence.

    Of course, these students could not reveal their spinning back kick knowledge without dishonoring themselves, which would of course require performance of hara-kiri (known vulgarly as "sepuku"). This unfortunately led to several taryu-jiai victories where the winner (by spinning back kick to the jaw of course) had to commit hara-kiri for revealing the secret technique.

    Eventually, one disciple initiated into the secrets of the spinning back kick made his way to Korea. Although he lost his menkyo kaiden and other documentation at a train station, no one could take away the feared spinning back kick of doom. Today, while the spinning back kick is known as a specialty of the Korean practitioners, its true origin among the Native Americans and journey to Japan has come to light. My teacher told me so, and he is never wrong.
    Tim Fong

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    6,225
    Likes (received)
    117

    Default Bokken always lethal?

    Originally posted by Shitoryu Dude
    I was trying to explain to my wife that the beatings he took would have killed him. You don't get up after that sort of punishment, no matter how "tough" and determined you are. Sticks are considered lethal weapons in their own right, and just about everybody instinctively knows that, but movies have their own reality.
    One of my impressions of the bokken (or jo, hanbo, etc.) is that you can wield it with a wide range of "intents" -- from non-contact and light contact in the dojo, to giving someone a real thumping to "teach them a lesson," to killing them if need be -- and everything in between.

    Unless one were on the giving or receiving end, rather than observing from the sidelines, it would be difficult to know what "that sort of punishment" was.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    6,225
    Likes (received)
    117

    Default Re: Close, but not quite.

    Originally posted by don
    The story was so close to history, I wonder why they didn't just use the real names. I don't know that history all that well, but Katsumoto would be Saigo Takamori. I wonder who they meant Omura to be--Katsu Kaishu? (Not a very flattering portrayal of one of Japan's saviors, if so...)
    I've seen the same thing in other Japanese and Japanese/American films.

    In Shogun you had Toranaga instead of Tokugawa, and John Blackthorn instead of Will Adams.

    In Sanjuro Sugata the Judo master was Professor Yano instead of Professor Kano.

    I don't know if it's a Japanese thing about using the names of dead people, or if it's just so no one can come back and say "That's not the way it really happened!"

    Of course, in this film if they changed Katsumoto to Takamori they would have had to change the Algren character from an American to a Frenchman. The way they shot it was better marketing, considering the size of the American movie audience.

    They did the same thing in Master & Commander, only in reverse. In the movie Russel Crowe is chasing a French ship. In the book it was an American ship.

    I guess a little creative license isn't going to kill a movie. I really liked all the above named films quite well.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Ft. Laud., Fl.
    Posts
    605
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default Re: Katana or Bokken

    Originally posted by Yagyu Kenshi
    My old sensei....during training he would always use the term katana, no matter what we were using at the time....His sensei, during a seminar I attended, did exactly the same thing, and he was a VERY traditional older Japanese gentleman.
    Thanks for the clarification.
    Don J. Modesto
    Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    ------------------------
    http://theaikidodojo.com/

  12. #27
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    NYC, NY, USA
    Posts
    341
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default It was what it was...

    Greetings,

    I saw the flick with my brother, a person who has never studied history or the martial arts. He is an artist, and he found the tale very enjoyable. I found it, on a movie-goers level, entertaining. Thats what it is supposed to be. I gave it 3 stars out of 4.

    However, on a historical note, there were several cultural and factual errors, ranging from the depiction of the Emperor in front of 'gaijin', to the comportment of a 'gaijin' in the presence of a daimyo, especially after his 'friendship' is displayed. I am sure that many historically trained in the culture and period depicted could and will list the gaffs they find in the film.

    By the way if I remember Japanese History 101, the rebellion was hosted by Samurai from the most Southern of the Home Islands and thus unlikely to be shut in by snow, for the winter. However, maybe I am mistaken, as that course was taken about 30 years ago.

    In terms of the arts I am not an adherent of the sword, but I found the ability of the good captain 'taking out' trained Ninja and even Samurai unbeliveable after training for a few short months. Despite his experience in both the American War Between the States and the Frontier Campaigns, his calvary saber techniques, would be inferior to the sword of a trained Samurai. This is because both his training time with the sword would be minute compared to the Samurai, and his tactics would be oriented more toward western methods, and his expertise would certainly be more with the pistol.

    On a less serious note, please be aware that the French officer Cruise's character was based on got his spinning back kick from the time he was military liaison to the Koreans (tongue in cheek). Doesn't anyone remember the impact of Chuck Norris's spinning back kick on the full contact ciruit in the late 60's and very early 70's?
    That kick was handed down from the Koreans to every military serviceman who ever served in Korea, no matter the era! This is the proof of where it came from (lol)

    Regards,
    TommyK
    Tom Militello
    "You can't hide on the mats." Terry Dobson sensei.

  13. #28
    stevemcgee99 Guest

    Default us military training

    I talked to one of the actors for a bit about some of the thinking the movie makers had, that the us military training would have prepared cruz character to fight with a sword. That is totally unlikely, I agree that pistol training would have been the brunt of training. Pistol and saber together, perhaps.
    How much sword v. sword training, too?

    I am looking forward to seein gthe flick, the japanese I know who have seen it are all pleased- by the way, it is REALLY big here.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Honolulu/New York City
    Posts
    448
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default Re: Re: Re: Just came from it...

    Originally posted by don
    Yeah. An entering score of 25, the absolute lowest possible for admission, and he gets into the Guard ahead of 100,000 other applicants (during the Vietnam draft.) Ugh.

    Q. What do you call a qualified F-102 fighter with an entering score of 25 and that got into the guard ahead of 100,000 apllicants?


    A. A qualified F-102 fighter pilot.

    Please, George W. Bush is not the first, the last, or the only person to ever benefit from who he was or who he knew. That is life, get over it. It could be worse, he could have been some scumbag that ran off to school in England.
    Christopher Moon

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,862
    Likes (received)
    90

    Default Re: Katana or Bokken

    Originally posted by Yagyu Kenshi
    My old sensei, when speaking about a specific type of sword or weapon, would use specific terms like bokken, iaito, tachi, katana, wakazashi, etc.

    But during training he would always use the term katana, no matter what we were using at the time. Bokken, Iaito, Shinken -- all were "Katana" during keiko. He told us to always think of the bokken as a sword, and to respect it as such.

    His sensei, during a seminar I attended, did exactly the same thing, and he was a VERY traditional older Japanese gentleman.
    In class when we are running late and or lose track of time and it is time to quit. Sensei will tell us to get Bokken for the closing ceremony. When we bow to the weapon it is always katana whether we are using a katana, or bokken. I've wondered about this.
    Ed Boyd

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •