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  1. #1
    Leighton Guest

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    How much do you charge each student? How do you determine how much to charge them?

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    It all depends on your area as well as your market. Mostly though martial arts schools on average are underpriced. The average is about $50 - $70. Some schools are on the high end or should I say are priced appropriately. The costs are around $250 per month. In my schools the programs average from $100 - $150 dependant on the programs that they chose.

    Always ask yourself what you are worth. Some schools are not priced right, because the teachers are not worth it. The reason why I say that is that they are not teaching the students properly, they may be the best fighters, top competitors but poor teachers.

    In spirit;
    Allie Alberigo
    Lininja.com

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    Do you use things like: year contracts with a discount, quarterly contracts & monthly payments ??

    Which do you find are the most popular and work best for you?
    Rogier van der Peijl

    REAL SCOTSMEN WEAR KILTS because sheep can hear a zipper at 500 yards!

    Originally posted by Cady Goldfield
    Ah, what a cutie, Rogier. I'll bet a lot of ladies in Netherlands are mourning because you are out of circulation now!

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    Dear Sir;

    Yes, I do use yearly agreements. I don't use the word contracts it has a very negative stigma attached to it.

    I do a trial program for 3 months but you can do that only once. Also, I do yearly agreements with a Black Belt Club and Masters Elite club.

    You must get on to agreements if you intend to do this full time and have your school, the students and the organization prosper.

    In spirit;
    Allie Alberigo
    lininja.com

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    Originally posted by Allie
    Dear Sir;

    Yes, I do use yearly agreements. I don't use the word contracts it has a very negative stigma attached to it.

    I do a trial program for 3 months but you can do that only once. Also, I do yearly agreements with a Black Belt Club and Masters Elite club.

    You must get on to agreements if you intend to do this full time and have your school, the students and the organization prosper.

    In spirit;
    Allie Alberigo
    lininja.com
    Allie,

    Is a yearly agreement the longest you use? If so have you used longer/shorter in the past? Why this particular length?

    I have certainly experienced that agreements can be very beneficial if you wish to have a successful organization/school. I remember in the old days our small training group would have folks that would constantly come and go. Even the regulars (including me) would take breaks whenever we felt like it. Once Mr. Russo (Tampa Quest Center) switched to using agreements that magically changed over night. I don't believe it was 'just' the agreements that caused this...but they certainly helped!
    Michael Stinson

    Phoenix Quest Center
    www.phoenixquestcenter.com

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    Gentlemen, perhaps you should review the following thread.

    http://www.e-budo.com/vbulletin/show...threadid=10895

    It all depends on your area as well as your market. Mostly though martial arts schools on average are underpriced. The average is about $50 - $70. Some schools are on the high end or should I say are priced appropriately. The costs are around $250 per month. In my schools the programs average from $100 - $150 dependant on the programs that they chose.
    Allie,
    As of today - based on the aforementioned thread's poll respondents, eighty percent are paying $1,000 annually or $83.00 monthly or less, sometimes a lot less. IMHO it would difficult outside the NYC metro area to see a commercially viable school charging more than $100 a month or more. Do they exist, yes. I as a consumer would expect a lot from them for that money beside basic MA courses; good facilities, generous flexible scheduling, multiple arts offered, ancillary fitness courses/equipment.

    Remember for the adult fitness dollar you are also competing against every YMCA or fitness gym franchise chain - which are cheaper. Most dojos in the USA are part-time, offering limited class times. The ones that are full-time are unfortunately too often "McDojos" diploma mills, after-school daycare, or MA cults in breeding.

    In my years of observing the MA scene often it is the charlatans who "catch the latest wave". Can anyone say "Japanese Samurai sword classes" in 2004?

    If they are cunning enough the charlatans charge students top dollar while "the art" is hot. The inevitable market correction, their inherent lack of abilities and general dissemination of the specific art's knowledge eventually catches up (sometimes).

    Some other related e-Budo threads about commercialization:

    http://www.e-budo.com/vbulletin/show...threadid=19733

    http://www.e-budo.com/vbulletin/show...threadid=19266

    Of course my comeback to cheap students is they will spend $3,000 a year to go skiing twenty times, or to golf forty times, but they bitch about spending $1,000 for an entire year of MA instruction and workouts.

    Maybe my sensei is undercharging, please don't tell him.
    John McPartland
    Well, but you can't expect to wield supreme executive power just 'cause some watery tart threw a sword at you!  I mean, if I went 'round saying I was an emperor just because some moistened bint had lobbed a scimitar at me, they'd put me away!

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    Okay in regards to the two questions. Yes, you are correct people will spend money on what they believe that they should. For instance you should make the students realize the value of your program. I do realize that some will prioritize other things above the martial arts. That is the struggle. You need to constantly educate the people.

    Also, the people who on average are charging less, then that is what they feel they are worth. In my opinion there is no place on the earth that can't afford martial arts classes. The price is not usually the issue. If people in the remote towns in Costa Rica can afford it, where I have a school then any one can. Remember, it is up to them to make it happen if they want to be a success. Each time a studio that I help or have helped in the past says "I can't do that in my state, country or town. " I just say try it. Usuallly they succeed at it.

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    Also, the people who on average are charging less, then that is what they feel they are worth
    I find that the tricky one... it's so difficult to decide (decide is not the word I'm looking for) what you are worth...

    How did you come to the prices that you are asking?
    Rogier van der Peijl

    REAL SCOTSMEN WEAR KILTS because sheep can hear a zipper at 500 yards!

    Originally posted by Cady Goldfield
    Ah, what a cutie, Rogier. I'll bet a lot of ladies in Netherlands are mourning because you are out of circulation now!

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    Dear Rodier;

    I think we are worth so much for what we do as martial arts teachers. We are changing peoples lives. Well, I hope. I know in our school we are. Many schools are not taping into all the other things that the martial arts has to offer. In fact our logo is It is not just kicking and punching it's the martial arts and beyond. Please don't steal that. HAHA.

    In our line of work it is a very fullfilling job. I believe that we should be getting more than personal trainers at $50-$100 per hour. Or as much as Doctors and Lawyers at $300 per hour. We are not just teaching them how to defend themselves - which could possibly save their lives (what is that worth) but we are teaching them life skills, that could help them in their jobs, relationships and so on.

    Also, the major step is getting the confidence in what you are doing and what you are worth. Once you have that you will charge the price you are valued at. If it helps you, average is about $80-100 per month. Anything less is crazy......


    In spirit;
    Allie Alberigo
    Lininja.com

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    Default Worth

    My sensei charges only 30 a month. But he teaches out of his home. I do belive I get good strong trainning. I have learn from him that he is more than a sensei.

    I started trainning with him at the age of 16. He became a freind. When I was lost or confused about life he was there. He didn't just teach the arts, he taught about life. How to grow up and be a good law abiding adult. He cared about his students not just the mighty dollar.

    I understand that if you have rent or things in that sense you have to charge more. But I feel in the case of my sensei. It was perfect.

    He was worth a hell of lot more. He taught, at least to me, LIFE. How can you put a price on that?

    I hope that answered your question.
    Train hard and you shall get what you trained for...

    Aaron Young
    Shotokan

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    One thing about a commercial dojo, is that it can provide a better learning atmosphere when compared to a garage. While there is nothing wrong with teaching out of a garage part time, if you intend to make it a profession, then I think you need to be professional and find your own studio. The garage dojo can be a good start…

    I think this is especially true when parents are looking for a school to enroll their children in.
    John Lindsey

    Oderint, dum metuant-Let them hate, so long as they fear.

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    Default question

    I agree to a point. I see my senseis point on doing it semi private. He thinks getting to know is students as a friend let alone a teacher will help teach them. Or help them learn better in the long run.

    He used to own his own studio, but learned he spent more time tring to get more students so he could keep the dojo open. And after a while it got to big. It kept getter hardier to give each student his full attation.

    I went to a dojo once in a big studio. It just felt to much as a McDojo to me. They just seem to be for money and not really teaching. So I left and a friend told me about his sensei and I have been there sence.

    But as the saying goes.( Each to there own). I also don't think I missed out on anything. And I understand if I want to study another art I better get used to a big group..
    Train hard and you shall get what you trained for...

    Aaron Young
    Shotokan

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    Dear Aaron;

    Sometimes on posts like these we actually forget about what the posts are all about. This is not a debate on whether a school is a Mcdojo or not. I don't even comprehend what that means. People are constantly hiding behind the larger dojo persona as if it were a bad thing. Usually these are the people who are not successful.

    The bottom line is it a good school or bad school? The big school like mine teaches many students at once. If done properly then everyone is learning practicing and training hard. Have you ever seen pictures of Morehei Ushiba Sensei teaching Aikido in Japan. He had 50-60 people training at once. I don't think this was a problem. It is all about the level of quality and training.

    I have seen many one man operations, that have terrible instructors and training. There students are worse than mine. Just because people think they are the best doesn't mean it is true.

    You are right when you say to each his own. The topic is about successful martial arts schools. Success to me, means helping students. While being able to keep your doors open and giving many students quality training.

    In spirit;
    Allie Alberigo

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    getting back to the value of teaching...

    Allie: do you also do private classes or have teachers do private classes? If so how much do you let the rate increase compared to a normal class?
    Rogier van der Peijl

    REAL SCOTSMEN WEAR KILTS because sheep can hear a zipper at 500 yards!

    Originally posted by Cady Goldfield
    Ah, what a cutie, Rogier. I'll bet a lot of ladies in Netherlands are mourning because you are out of circulation now!

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    Gosh, I provide instruction for free. Guess that makes me worthless, along with every other instructor in the CKF.

    I don't buy this "what you charge equates with what you're worth" argument for a second. If you're commercial, you charge what the market will bear, no matter what your business. If you want to rationalize that your services are worth as much as a doctor's, you can try charging that and see if people will pay - I think you'll be disappointed.
    Neil Gendzwill
    Saskatoon Kendo Club

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