Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Q&A: Kage-ryu

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,654
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default Q&A: Kage-ryu

    Hyaku-san agreed to do a Q&A on the arts he has experienced. Since he is knowledgeable of Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu, Kage-ryu, Niten Ichi-ryu AND kendo, I will make separate threads to keep them distinct.

    In this thread, please feel free to ask Hyaku about Kage-ryu. Thank you, Hyaku! Please note that much of the info is available at www.hyoho.com

    First question: What is the full name of the style, what does it mean, and can you tell me a little something about the history?
    We are the Sherlock Holmes English Speaking Vernacular. Help save Fu Manchu, Moriarty and Dracula.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    138
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    When are you going to post a video of you doing batto? Every so often you tease us and say you're going to put a video on your site!

    Seriously, I'm fascinated by what I've read at your site, but don't know where to begin... OK, here's a generic question: You've mentioned that because of the long handle, straight forward downward cuts are difficult, and that actually all the cuts in the Kage-ryu are at an angle. How else is using such a sword different? I would imagine that its harder to stop the blade and recovery after a cut, and that would lead to more "flowing" motions from one cut to the next.
    --Timothy Kleinert

    Aikido & Qigongs

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    JAPAN
    Posts
    1,616
    Likes (received)
    108

    Default

    Hello Mr Klienhart

    Yes it is much harder to stop the blade. When I started it was perhaps the hardest thing. But like Hyoho Niten Ichiryu the body and tanden come towards the cut and the hips drop way down. This all adds a finality to the action.

    Also it took a lot of time to get the legs stretched out which enables one to get lower and also makes drawing a lot easier.

    Enshin ryoku is used. Big circular flowing movements which sometimes resemble describing a figure of eight on its side.

    I have recently bought a digital analog converter. All I need now is to choose a decent clip. But most of all is the problem of the size of the file that grabs the bandwidth.
    Hyakutake Colin

    All the best techniques are taught by survivors.


    http://www.hyoho.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,654
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    After I asked my question I found this excellent write-up on the art at Koryu.com. For anyone interested, this would be the bets place to start:

    http://www.koryu.com/library/chyakutake1.html
    We are the Sherlock Holmes English Speaking Vernacular. Help save Fu Manchu, Moriarty and Dracula.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Texas
    Posts
    2,000
    Likes (received)
    125

    Default Seminars ...

    Greetings Sir,
    Would it be possible, in your estimation, to begin teaching the rudiments of Kage ryu through seminars such as those you are currently involved in with Niten Ichi ryu? I ask because I am concerned with the apparent lack of desire in Japan for learning this art.

    Cheers,
    Paul Smith
    "Always keep the sharp side and the pointy end between you and your opponent"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    JAPAN
    Posts
    1,616
    Likes (received)
    108

    Default Re: Seminars ...

    Originally posted by pgsmith
    Greetings Sir, Would it be possible, in your estimation, to begin teaching the rudiments of Kage ryu through seminars such as those you are currently involved in with Niten Ichi ryu? I ask because I am concerned with the apparent lack of desire in Japan for learning this art. Cheers,
    Thanks I appreciate your concern. My teacher who has long since retired had a similar concern. But sadly the protectionism that has helped it survive could be its down fall. Its still here a "What we have in Yanagawa" thing. It's just me who gets the calls to go and do Embu.

    It has been suggested that I join the Nihon Kobudo Shinkokai as The Kageryu. But with who?

    In other ryu a see a healthy attempt to promote the ways both here and abroad both from students and teachers, so I feel its my obligation to continue to do some more indians work before I become a chief.

    There is at the moment a generation change taking place in Hyoho Niten Ichiryu. Here my responsibilities are increasing.

    In other countrys there is so much to do and they do have that awareness and purpose. I'm feeling sorry for the some of the other members at the minute. It's me who gets the preferential instruction with that in mind.

    I have found a home in HNIR that keeps me very busy most of the time but still pop next door now and again to fly the flag.


    Who knows. In future it might be possible to run the two on one course. but for the time being there is far too much to do with one ryu.

    Again thanks for your concern/
    Hyakutake Colin

    All the best techniques are taught by survivors.


    http://www.hyoho.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Texas
    Posts
    2,000
    Likes (received)
    125

    Default Another question ...

    Another question that has been rattling around in my head for years. It is a bit frivolous, so feel free to ignore it!
    How much did your last chokken cost you? I imagine there are not alot of smiths that are willing (or able!) to make a shinken of that size, not to mention the togi-shi. It is something that I've wondered about for a while.

    Cheers,
    Paul Smith
    "Always keep the sharp side and the pointy end between you and your opponent"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    740
    Likes (received)
    0

    Talking Stretches

    Originally posted by hyaku

    Also it took a lot of time to get the legs stretched out which enables one to get lower and also makes drawing a lot easier.
    What kind of stretching exercise do you do?

    I've been concerned about the same for a different reason. Tightness of my legs gives me a short fumikomi which I would really like to lengthen.

    Also, I noticed that some folks in iai can do suwariwaza with their toes practically perpendicular to their in-step!!! That gives them a lot of movement control and contact. My toes can be bent a little more than 45 degrees relative to the instep, so after a seminar, the tips of my toes would hurt real bad as a smaller area for use in movement makes for more wear and tear...

    Help?
    David Pan

    "What distinguishes budo from various sport activities is the quest for perfection."

    - Kenji Tokitsu

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    JAPAN
    Posts
    1,616
    Likes (received)
    108

    Default Re: Stretches

    Originally posted by DCPan
    What kind of stretching exercise do you do?
    Help?
    We dont do suwariwaza so no problem there.

    Long, low standing kamae with the side of the back calf muscle almost touching the floor. Both legs need stretching as there are waza for drawing with the right leg forward too.

    Seiza isnt a problem as its a daily living thing here for most. But I notice sports teacher use chairs though and dont wish to mess up the joints. Old people can get down there but they cant get up again.
    Hyakutake Colin

    All the best techniques are taught by survivors.


    http://www.hyoho.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    83
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default A few questions

    Mr. Hyakutake,

    You mention on your website that there are several makimono and other manuscripts in the Kage ryu tradition. As it is a style inherited within a single family I would find it quite interesting to hear about them. Could you give a brief summary on these or a few examples and without going into the actual technical details, a bit about the contents of the various makimono?

    Is there information of the ryuha that the founder Yamamoto Hisaya Masakatsu trained before founding the Kage ryu?

    As a Japanese student I've for some reason also grown an intrest in the nomenclature in classical Japanese martial arts. Could you give some examples about names of techniques or terms which a Kage ryu student often runs into and a general description what these terms mean (again I'm not looking for detailed technical explanation, or the okuden, just to get the general idea)? And while I'm at it, is there any story connected to name Kage ryu (i.e. why did Yamamoto Hisaya Masakatsu decide to use the Kage kanji)?

    While here in Japan, I've noticed that Japanese are not stressing too much about the separation between different religions and you also mention that the Kage ryu itself is not connected to any religion, but do you feel that some particular religion has especially influenced the Kage ryu's approach to conflict (or "philosophy" for the lack of a better word..)? This question is also partly connected to the nomenclature as a lot of traditional Japanese arts seem to lift some their nomenclature from various religious sources (while not necessarily with any connection to the original meaning of the word).

    Thank you in advance!
    -Mikko Vilenius

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    JAPAN
    Posts
    1,616
    Likes (received)
    108

    Default Re: A few questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Vile
    Mr. Hyakutake,

    You mention on your website that there are several makimono and other manuscripts in the Kage ryu tradition. As it is a style inherited within a single family I would find it quite interesting to hear about them. Could you give a brief summary on these or a few examples and without going into the actual technical details, a bit about the contents of the various makimono?
    Some have been handed down throught the generations. Others came forth a few years ago after a descendant of one particular Shihan had seen me on NHK Television. Like other ryu its mostly an oral tradition. But the diagrams and writings give us some confirmation as to how we should practice and the formal etiquette that was done.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vile
    Is there information of the ryuha that the founder Yamamoto Hisaya Masakatsu trained before founding the Kage ryu?
    It seems he had done Taisha Ryu and Hoki ryu.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vile
    As a Japanese student I've for some reason also grown an intrest in the nomenclature in classical Japanese martial arts. Could you give some examples about names of techniques or terms which a Kage ryu student often runs into and a general description what these terms mean (again I'm not looking for detailed technical explanation, or the okuden, just to get the general idea)?
    Yes all the techniques have names. We have no idea why those particular names were chosen.


    Quote Originally Posted by Vile
    And while I'm at it, is there any story connected to name Kage ryu (i.e. why did Yamamoto Hisaya Masakatsu decide to use the Kage kanji)?
    That info is on the web page.


    Quote Originally Posted by Vile
    While here in Japan, I've noticed that Japanese are not stressing too much about the separation between different religions and you also mention that the Kage ryu itself is not connected to any religion, but do you feel that some particular religion has especially influenced the Kage ryu's approach to conflict (or "philosophy" for the lack of a better word..)?
    No that we know of. There are no particular religious or philosophical ideals that have been handed down with the Ryu, at least not up the the present.

    Thanks for your interest.
    Hyakutake Colin

    All the best techniques are taught by survivors.


    http://www.hyoho.com

  12. #12
    Shin Buke Guest

    Default

    Hello Mr. Hyakutake,

    I'm curious as to the application of Kage-ryu on the battlefield. You mention on your site that there are techniques used on horesback as well as many techniques used while on foot against other foot-soldiers. However, the sheer size of the swords used in the Kage-ryu look like they would be exceptional shock weapons used to break enemy weaponry and pound into a very scared front line. They also look like they could be used to slash at the legs of horses and dismount cavalrymen. Are there any techniques that indicate these types of application?

    Thank you for your time! ^_^

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    JAPAN
    Posts
    1,616
    Likes (received)
    108

    Default

    Originally posted by Shin Buke
    Hello Mr. Hyakutake,

    I'm curious as to the application of Kage-ryu on the battlefield. You mention on your site that there are techniques used on horesback as well as many techniques used while on foot against other foot-soldiers. However, the sheer size of the swords used in the Kage-ryu look like they would be exceptional shock weapons used to break enemy weaponry and pound into a very scared front line. They also look like they could be used to slash at the legs of horses and dismount cavalrymen. Are there any techniques that indicate these types of application?

    Thank you for your time! ^_^
    Its never been mentioned that we slash with that specific pupose in mind.

    But there is one particular horizontal slashing technique that comes off the hip and finishes on the opposite side to turn the blade and slash again. I would assume that its done with this in mind or in a mellee attack.
    Hyakutake Colin

    All the best techniques are taught by survivors.


    http://www.hyoho.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •