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Thread: Japanese hate foreign workers

  1. #1
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    Default Japanese hate foreign workers

    Xenophobia soars as 30% hate idea of foreign workers in Japan


    Nearly 30 percent of Japanese don't want foreign workers to come into the country to fill what is forecast to be a massive labor shortage in coming years, a Cabinet Office survey has showed.

    Rising 6 points on the previous survey results from four years ago, 29.1 percent of the 2,075 Japanese canvassed said the idea of importing foreign labor to fill job spaces was "not good."

    Anti-foreigner sentiment was also evident in respondents' answers to how they would deal with workers overstaying their visas, with 61.8 percent saying all those without valid permits "should be deported immediately."

    Fourty-five percent of respondents said they would rather put women and the elderly to better use in the workforce than use foreigners, but added the would accept foreign workers in case of labor shortage. (Mainichi Shimbun, July 25, 2004)
    Daniel Madar

  2. #2
    Mekugi Guest

    Default Re: Japanese hate foreign workers

    Sieg heil!

    Originally posted by Silent Dan

    Xenophobia soars as 30% hate idea of foreign workers in Japan


    Nearly 30 percent of Japanese don't want foreign workers to come into the country to fill what is forecast to be a massive labor shortage in coming years, a Cabinet Office survey has showed.

    Rising 6 points on the previous survey results from four years ago, 29.1 percent of the 2,075 Japanese canvassed said the idea of importing foreign labor to fill job spaces was "not good."

    Anti-foreigner sentiment was also evident in respondents' answers to how they would deal with workers overstaying their visas, with 61.8 percent saying all those without valid permits "should be deported immediately."

    Fourty-five percent of respondents said they would rather put women and the elderly to better use in the workforce than use foreigners, but added the would accept foreign workers in case of labor shortage. (Mainichi Shimbun, July 25, 2004)

  3. #3
    Gene Williams Guest

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    That's great liberal editorializing...there is nothing in the article about "hating" foreign workers. They simply said it was a bad idea abnd that their own immigration laws should be enforced. It would not hurt us to increase our concerns in those areas...and a typical mindless liberal response in "sieg heil" from Mekugi. You guys just love to whine "ewwww!!! nazi" to anything that might restrict total license or anarchy.

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    Gene,

    Do you know what it is like to live here?

    Have you ever been refused entry to a premiere at a cinema because you're white, regardless of the fact that you bought a ticket in advance?

    How about being talked about in the third person at the office, even though the people know you are there and fluent in the language?

    How about this one that happened just last week, sitting in a crowded train and having everyone avoid sitting next to you because you're a different skin colour?

    Can we say xenophobic?

  5. #5
    Gene Williams Guest

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    I've never lived there...was there in '72 for 8 weeks. I didn't experience any of the things you have mentioned, but I was a guest and did not speak the language.

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    72'?

    This is 2004 man!

    Money is tight and Tokyo is one of the most expensive places to live and the rest of the country isnt that far behind.

    Foreigners are seen as entertainment, novelties and a means of making more money for Japan Inc.

    I live in Korea now and they only thing really different is the cost of living and how much more money I save.

    Gene, go to Tokyo for a year. See how it is then.
    Jody Holeton
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    OPEN 24 hours, 7 days a week,
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    Default My thought

    I did live Japan, and basically my thoughts on the matter are this. There are some Japanese who are xenophobic and rascist, but the majority of the one's I knew were generally normal people. Then again that is probably why I associated with them, and not their narrow minded cousins. I even experienced a little xenophobia from a fellow kendoka at my old kendo dojo, who started on a tirade about gaijin this and gaijin that. But he was wrong, and sensei repirmanded him for his ignorance. But overall, I mean it wasn't any less racist then some places in the States. I live in the South now and there some ignorant people here who think anyone not white is no good.
    Gary MacMullen
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    I've been on crowded trains in Japan and had no one sit near me. It was cool..I had room! Then I started to make funny noises and talk to my shopping bag just for good measure.
    David F. Craik

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    Default

    I think perhaps the dojo is one of the only places I can expect normality. Its a good leveler as we all work hard together with the same aims. But that's as a regular not a visitor.

    As for the rest? I rarely even venture out to new restarants. After being here so long the general apathy wears a bit thin.

    When you can get on plane, fly a few hours away to another country and not even get stared at let alone talked about the mind boggles as to what's actually going through their brains.

    I would have to say a guest is a guest. A totaly "On display" act for Japanese saying "Ai amu Intanshionaru". I have have Rotary Club function to go to tonight and will meet quite a few of those.

    To change the thread a bit: I happened to turn on the TV last night to catch a Discovery Channel program on someone visiting Japan for Aikido. Yet another total bulls??t production of "Gaijin meets Japan"
    Hyakutake Colin

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  10. #10
    Kimpatsu Guest

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    Originally posted by Gene Williams
    That's great liberal editorializing...there is nothing in the article about "hating" foreign workers. They simply said it was a bad idea abnd that their own immigration laws should be enforced. It would not hurt us to increase our concerns in those areas...and a typical mindless liberal response in "sieg heil" from Mekugi. You guys just love to whine "ewwww!!! nazi" to anything that might restrict total license or anarchy.
    Gene, I think you mean "chaos". Anarchy is a political system that means "without leaders".
    As to restricting our liberties, I'm sure you believe it's the right thing to do ("It would not hurt us to increase our concerns in those areas"), but for those of us who beleive in freedom of the individual, it's unacceptable. Our presence here enriches Japan by making the country more diverse and multicultural--never a bad thing. The US equivalent would be to deport all the black people, and I'm sure you're not arguing for that. (Are you?!) Xenophobia in Japan is a major problem. It is a synonym for racism, because the Japanese mistakenly believe themselves to be a homogenous people. Thus, any move to curb or restrict foreign ingress is a racist act.
    Maybe if you came and lived here for a few years, you'd develop a better understanding.

  11. #11
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    I would argue that the average Japanese person is no more or less racist than the typical American citizen.
    The bigger issue w/Japan is that the xenophobic/racist policies are legitimized and legalized by politics, bureaucracy, and education.

    For example:
    * You can be born and raised in Japan, living in no other country your entire life, and still not be qualified to get Japanese citizenship. The best you'll get is 'permanent resident'. You'll have to take a Japanese language test to prove you're able to attend university, and you won't be qualified to fill any but the lowest-level government bureaucratic jobs...yet you pay taxes, insurance, pension, etc. like all other citizens (though you do not have the right to vote since you are not a citizen.)

    * It is perfectly legal to discriminate based on race. While the letter of Japanese law is in sync w/international universal rights law, several cases that have gone through the courts have supported bars/restaurants/bath houses/hotels' "right to refuse service."

    * As a foreigner in Japan, you can be stopped and questioned by a law enforcement officer or government official at any time, for any reason (or no reason.) Failure to show proper ID (your gaijin registration card, which you are required by law to carry with you 24/7) or to be non-compliant can lead to your arrest and deporture.

    * You can be denied bank accounts, credit cards, rental housing, loans, etc. based simply on the fact that you are not Japanese. This is perfectly legal and there's not a damn thing you can do about it.

    Regards,

    r e n

  12. #12
    Kimpatsu Guest

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    Originally posted by renfield_kuroda
    I would argue that the average Japanese person is no more or less racist than the typical American citizen.
    The bigger issue w/Japan is that the xenophobic/racist policies are legitimized and legalized by politics, bureaucracy, and education.
    For example:
    * You can be born and raised in Japan, living in no other country your entire life, and still not be qualified to get Japanese citizenship. The best you'll get is 'permanent resident'. You'll have to take a Japanese language test to prove you're able to attend university, and you won't be qualified to fill any but the lowest-level government bureaucratic jobs...yet you pay taxes, insurance, pension, etc. like all other citizens (though you do not have the right to vote since you are not a citizen.)
    * It is perfectly legal to discriminate based on race. While the letter of Japanese law is in sync w/international universal rights law, several cases that have gone through the courts have supported bars/restaurants/bath houses/hotels' "right to refuse service."
    * As a foreigner in Japan, you can be stopped and questioned by a law enforcement officer or government official at any time, for any reason (or no reason.) Failure to show proper ID (your gaijin registration card, which you are required by law to carry with you 24/7) or to be non-compliant can lead to your arrest and deporture.
    * You can be denied bank accounts, credit cards, rental housing, loans, etc. based simply on the fact that you are not Japanese. This is perfectly legal and there's not a damn thing you can do about it.
    Regards,
    r e n
    Ren, unless you are a member of the KKK, Americans at least tend to see people of other races as equally American, which is not the case in Japan; ethnicity maketh the Japanese. The other, legal examples that you cite just go to prove my point: you would never get away with such blatant racism in 21st century America. This is going to be a long fight for all of us.
    (BTW, the noun is "deportation", not "deporture". )
    Best,

  13. #13
    Gene Williams Guest

    Default

    Originally posted by Kimpatsu
    Gene, I think you mean "chaos". Anarchy is a political system that means "without leaders".
    As to restricting our liberties, I'm sure you believe it's the right thing to do ("It would not hurt us to increase our concerns in those areas"), but for those of us who beleive in freedom of the individual, it's unacceptable. Our presence here enriches Japan by making the country more diverse and multicultural--never a bad thing. The US equivalent would be to deport all the black people, and I'm sure you're not arguing for that. (Are you?!) Xenophobia in Japan is a major problem. It is a synonym for racism, because the Japanese mistakenly believe themselves to be a homogenous people. Thus, any move to curb or restrict foreign ingress is a racist act.
    Maybe if you came and lived here for a few years, you'd develop a better understanding.
    You misspelled "believe." The assumption that multi-culturalism and diversity are "good" for a society is current fadistic thinking. To a degree it may be true, but forcing it as a political agenda is destructive of the culture. The primary business of government should not be protecting and promoting minorities and insuring quotas of immigrants, legal or not. However, American liberals and meddlesome Brits and Europeans want to insure that the dismantling of American culture continues apace. I personally think that we need about ten years under someone like Francisco Franco, but my wife says I should not say that in public.

  14. #14
    Kimpatsu Guest

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    Originally posted by Gene Williams
    You misspelled "believe."
    No, I mistyped it. (New PC; still not used to the keyboard. I keep hitting what I think is the "Delete" key, but on this keyboard, the DEL key is in a different place, and I'm pressing the "Pause/Break" key. Aaaggghhh....!
    Originally posted by Gene Williams
    The assumption that multi-culturalism and diversity are "good" for a society is current fadistic thinking. To a degree it may be true, but forcing it as a political agenda is destructive of the culture. The primary business of government should not be protecting and promoting minorities and insuring quotas of immigrants, legal or not. However, American liberals and meddlesome Brits and Europeans want to insure that the dismantling of American culture continues apace. I personally think that we need about ten years under someone like Francisco Franco, but my wife says I should not say that in public.
    Does America have a culture? (Hollywood and MacDonalds do not a culture make.)
    Is Japanese culture so fragile that it will break up and disappear when faced with people of different skin colours? I think not. Multiculturalism and ethnic diversity, however, are always good for society, for they broaden one's perspective and introduce one to new paradigms and modes of thought. Oh, and the role of government is to maximise everyone's freedoms. People should be allowed to live wherever they like. The only reason millions of Mexicans want to cross the Rio Grande is because the US has bullied their economy into the ground, so they have to go where the pickings are richer (even though as wetbacks they're on the lowest rung of the US social ladder).
    Anyway, I still think you're a wimp. Franco? Surely a red-blooded fascist like you would prefer Mussolini or--dare I say it--Hitler?
    Best,

  15. #15
    Gene Williams Guest

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    No...no Hitler or Mussolini. But Spain did pretty well under Franco and Americans used to go live there because there was little crime, peace and quiet, and our money was good there. I just believe that it is time for a more serious swing to the right...and, for that, Bush is a lightweight. Pat Buchanan might fit the bill

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