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Thread: Ukemi with Sword

  1. #1
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    Default Ukemi with Sword

    I know this has been covered a little in a few places, but I am curious about something that wasn't really talked about (as far as I saw)... I figure that no matter how good Takeda Sokaku was, when surounded by so many he might have lost his footing somewhere along the line while either wearing his favorite sword or using it. Assuming he did, even once <g>, he would have had to perform ukemi of some type while wearing or using the sword. If that is true, should WE (as people most likely VERY inferior to Takeda Sokaku in ability and technique) be practicing ukemi while wearing at the very least, a waki-sized bokken?

    Opinions?

    Thanks!

    Carlos
    E. Carlos Estrella, Jr.

    The strength of a man is not measured in how much he can lift, how many he can fight or how much he can endure, but in his capacity to admit his limitations and learn to successfully circumvent them.

  2. #2
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    Default We should, and some of us do.

    Most definately.

    We practice ukemi with sword in hand and in obi, or while holding the bared sword with the saya in the obi. Forward rolls, backward rolls, and turning rolls for when you need to change directions or can't go the direction you are facing for some reason. We also practice rolling and drawing from seiza, with the the sword on the floor at your side, forward, backward, and at angles to avoid an attack from behind. All of these are done with the long sword with the wakizashi or tanto in the obi. These are initially practiced with bokuto, but eventually are done with shinken once the form is learned.
    Richard Elias
    Takamura-ha Shindo Yoshin ryu
    Yanagi Ryu

  3. #3
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    Default not aiki but...

    Yagyu Shingan-Ryu claims that their peculiar style of ukemi (basically flips and cartwheels) was designed to protect the sword and allow the practitioner to fall without worrying about the saya. If you can find the video of the third Aiki friendship demo, the demonstrator talks about this quite a bit.
    Christian Moses
    **Certified Slimy, Moronic, Deranged and Demented Soul by Saigo-ha Daito Ryu!**
    Student of:
    Shinto Ryu Iai-Battojutsu
    Tuesday Night Bad Budo Club (TM)

  4. #4
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    Default Thanks!

    Richard,

    Knowing your particular ryu-ha, I DEFINITELY appreciate your input (as well as yours Chris)! Now if I could only get you guys to the Orlando Tai Kai...

    Though the instructors I've been privileged to learn from are quite good and honorable men, I haven't had the chance to do other than experiment using my old waki and both long and short bokkens. Maybe someday...

    Again, thanks!

    Carlos
    E. Carlos Estrella, Jr.

    The strength of a man is not measured in how much he can lift, how many he can fight or how much he can endure, but in his capacity to admit his limitations and learn to successfully circumvent them.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Hi Carlos,

    I remember watching Obata sensei doing forward rolls with a sword in his obi; he might have done other ukemi, but I definitely remember the forward rolls. You might want to practice with a bokuto, though. :^D

    Cheers,
    Guy
    Guy H. Power
    Kenshinkan Dojo

  6. #6
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    Default One of those "Distinguished Teachers" I was talking about!

    Hi Guy Sensei!

    Thanks for the input... and the advise (and for not freaking out when I used shinken in your classes <g>).

    Warmest regards,

    Carlos
    E. Carlos Estrella, Jr.

    The strength of a man is not measured in how much he can lift, how many he can fight or how much he can endure, but in his capacity to admit his limitations and learn to successfully circumvent them.

  7. #7
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    Default Ukemi...

    You should practice ukemi with ALL of the weapons that you use in class, and also those you use in regular everyday life (like guns for cops).

    For swords and knives practice both with the weapons sheathed and drawn. Ukemi with swords is pretty easy, I find the longer battlefield weapons like Yari more of a challenge.
    Lance Boggs
    _____________________

    "The man who can most truly be accounted brave is he who best knows the meaning of what is sweet in life and what is terrible, and then goes out undeterred to meet what is to come."

    Pericles

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Ukemi...

    Originally posted by Sillal
    You should practice ukemi with ALL of the weapons that you use in class, and also those you use in regular everyday life (like guns for cops).
    Funny you should mention that... I still occasionally get invited to train/train with LEO's I know... and I'll tell ya... doing ANY kind of breakfall wearing a Sam Browne is an experience you won't soon forget. (You aikidoka think having your hakama tied the wrong way hurts your spine... try a pair of cuffs!) Also, wearing a shoulder rig (I USED to be partial to the Galco Miami Classic) and doing a simple shoulder roll became an embarrassing experience (try it sometime WITHOUT the belt straps)!

    Sorry my mini-rant was little off topic but still applies I guess :-D .

    Regards,

    Carlos
    E. Carlos Estrella, Jr.

    The strength of a man is not measured in how much he can lift, how many he can fight or how much he can endure, but in his capacity to admit his limitations and learn to successfully circumvent them.

  9. #9
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    Default Tai Kai

    I was really hoping to make it to the Orlando slicey-dicey shin-dig this year, but alas, our teacher from Japan is coming to visit us for the first time in something like 8 years that weekend. I promise to at least try really hard to make it next year if someone has a couch that I can surf for the weekend.
    Christian Moses
    **Certified Slimy, Moronic, Deranged and Demented Soul by Saigo-ha Daito Ryu!**
    Student of:
    Shinto Ryu Iai-Battojutsu
    Tuesday Night Bad Budo Club (TM)

  10. #10
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    Default Chris...

    And I though I had excuses... letting a little thing like your sensei visiting for the first time in 8 years get in the way of the Tai Kai... <HUGE TEASE> FOR SHAME!!! </HUGE TEASE>

    Seriously, since so many folks have that lodging problem (money is ALWAYS a factor)... maybe we can create some sort of "collection" for a campground or something for the upcoming Tai Kais. I'd donate my yard if folks want to pitch tents, but I live in that "other part" of the Orlando area that isn't always nice .

    If you want to show me those Yagyu moves, I may loan you the couch next year <g>.

    Carlos
    E. Carlos Estrella, Jr.

    The strength of a man is not measured in how much he can lift, how many he can fight or how much he can endure, but in his capacity to admit his limitations and learn to successfully circumvent them.

  11. #11
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    Default

    [Post deleted by user]
    Last edited by Nathan Scott; 10th June 2014 at 22:39.
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

  12. #12
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    Default Thanks Nathan!

    I can imagine what he's done in the past... in fact I recall his son (I think) doing ukemi after having his sword taken away by Obata Sensei, so I'd assume his son (and of course Obata Sensei) would have to have practiced not only ukemi with a sword, but also how to avoid the sword after it's taken away.

    Got ur PM - will reply soon... and thanks!

    Regards,

    Carlos
    E. Carlos Estrella, Jr.

    The strength of a man is not measured in how much he can lift, how many he can fight or how much he can endure, but in his capacity to admit his limitations and learn to successfully circumvent them.

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