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Thread: A list of Japanese language study books for everyone: Beginners to advanced

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    Smile A list of Japanese language study books for everyone: Beginners to advanced

    A list of Japansese language study books will be posted here.
    Carolyn Hall


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    Found some good Japanese books for beginers on overstock.com.

    Japanese for Everyone for half price:

    http://www.overstock.com/cgi-bin/d2....PROD_ID=798742

    Japanese Particle Workbook for a reasonable price:

    http://www.overstock.com/cgi-bin/d2....PROD_ID=797075

    And for anyone into Hojojutsu:

    http://www.overstock.com/cgi-bin/d2....PROD_ID=406173

    Found them October 23, 2004 and have no idea how long they will last.
    Saburo Kitazono

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    Judging from the cover, thats where the word "HO" came from hehehe

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    What do you mean, when you say, Japanese Particle book. Is it something related to their writing systems or what?
    “To every man there comes a in his lifetime that special moment when he is figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing unique to him and fitted to his talent; what a tragedy if that moment finds him unprepared or unqualified for the work which would be his finest hour.”
    Sir Winston Churchill


    Matthew Gehrke

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    What do you mean, when you say, Japanese Particle book. Is it something related to their writing systems or what?
    Japanese Particles are probably the most difficult part of the Japanese language to master. The subtle manipulation of subatomic particles while speaking is one of the things that makes the Japanese so unique. A foreigner could study Japanese for years and seem like they are pronouncing the words correctly but without the ability to affect the proper vibrations across specific particles all they will get from the Japanese person they are trying to communicate with is a blank stare.

    So for $20 or less you can get that workbook.

    Pretty neat stuff.
    Saburo Kitazono

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    well thanks for clearing that up, for me.
    Boy do I feel dumb. I think I would have picked it up, in my Japanese club meetings. I know 2 girls, from Tokyo, the first one, moved back to Tokyo, she came as a foriegn exchange student. The other one, is now living here in Phoenix, she goes to my highschool. Its funny, everytime I try t otalk to her, I get tongue-tied.
    “To every man there comes a in his lifetime that special moment when he is figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing unique to him and fitted to his talent; what a tragedy if that moment finds him unprepared or unqualified for the work which would be his finest hour.”
    Sir Winston Churchill


    Matthew Gehrke

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    Default More Japanese Books

    Hey, before I forget, I know of a few good books.

    Remembering the Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji 1,2,3. I hear the author, James W. Hesig, is writing a fourth book on kanji. I think the books, are availible at Barnes&Noble, website. I dont know the exact address.
    “To every man there comes a in his lifetime that special moment when he is figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing unique to him and fitted to his talent; what a tragedy if that moment finds him unprepared or unqualified for the work which would be his finest hour.”
    Sir Winston Churchill


    Matthew Gehrke

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    Heisig's books are good but you shouldn't have to by books to learn kana.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...glance&s=books
    Last edited by Saburo; 4th January 2005 at 05:47.
    Saburo Kitazono

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    Originally posted by MartArtsNovice
    What do you mean, when you say, Japanese Particle book. Is it something related to their writing systems or what?
    Originally posted by Saburo
    Japanese Particles are probably the most difficult part of the Japanese language to master. The subtle manipulation of subatomic particles while speaking is one of the things that makes the Japanese so unique....
    Well, Saburo, I thought your tongue-in-cheek answer was pretty funny, but to be fair maybe you should have followed it with the real answer to MartArtsNovice's question.

    Particles are parts of both spoken and written Japanese that tie together words in a sentence. Different particles are used depending on the type of subject and object being referred to; for example if you were saying "the boy is on the bed" you would use a different particle than if you were saying "the book is on the bed," because one subject is alive and one is inanimate.

    I'm not very far into my Japanese studies yet, but particles and counters look like they are going to give me trouble.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    Well, Saburo, I thought your tongue-in-cheek answer was pretty funny, but to be fair maybe you should have followed it with the real answer to MartArtsNovice's question.
    I guess you're right but if he was really interested he could find out in just a few seconds.

    Jay Rubin's "Making Sense of Japanese" was worth the money.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...glance&s=books
    Saburo Kitazono

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    Well, I want to thank both of you, for helping me understand what the particles, were.
    “To every man there comes a in his lifetime that special moment when he is figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing unique to him and fitted to his talent; what a tragedy if that moment finds him unprepared or unqualified for the work which would be his finest hour.”
    Sir Winston Churchill


    Matthew Gehrke

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    Originally posted by MartArtsNovice
    Well, I want to thank both of you, for helping me understand what the particles, were.
    You are most certainly welcome.

    Since you are (I think) already starting to learn to speak Japanese, keep an ear open for the little "wa," "ga," and "no" words found in many sentences. Those are some very common particles.

    Best of luck in your studies.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    HaHaHa,

    I actually was able to know a girl, from Japan. At first she would say wa, when she was understanding what was being said. Afterwards, she'd say it to annoy me. I wish I could see her again, she was a good friend of mine. I truly miss her, my school seems a little lonely with her back in japan. But I still wish her the best of luck, in everything she does.
    “To every man there comes a in his lifetime that special moment when he is figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing unique to him and fitted to his talent; what a tragedy if that moment finds him unprepared or unqualified for the work which would be his finest hour.”
    Sir Winston Churchill


    Matthew Gehrke

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    These are the course books I've got for my Japanese language class (Part-time beginners level at the School of Oriental and African Studies).

    Shin Nihongo no Kiso, Japanese Kana Workbook, £5.99
    ISBN: 4-906224-28-8

    Minna no Nihongo I Main Text (Kana Version) £19.99
    ISBN: 4-88319-102-8

    Minna no Nihongo I Grammar Notes £14.99
    ISBN: 4-88319-107-9

    Publisher for the above: 3A Network

    I'm finding them very good and feel like I'm actually getting somewhere. Minna no Nihongo I also has an accompanying CD/tape which I'm yet to get.

    I've not found any online suppliers in the UK, only language book shops. I do believe that Amazon.com stocks them though.

    Hope this helps.
    Hanna Dathedi

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    Japanese Step by Step by Gene Nishi is good at breaking down sentance structure and has a good set of vocabulary in each chapter.

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