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Thread: Choosing a Shinken

  1. #16
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    Originally posted by heresjonny
    Also, does anyone know if Dotanuki shinken are any good?
    Whose Dotanuki? Dotanuki isn't a brand name, it's a reference to a famous sword, the Masakune Dotanuki. Several companies make reproductions of the actual Masakune, while some just use it to describe a large, heavy blade in their line.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  2. #17
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    Sorry, I didn't read the small print properly, try the "Dotanuki Shinken" at <http://sdksupplies.netfirms.com/cat_shinken.htm>, that was the one I meant!
    Jonathan Freeman

    Correct Thought Is The Essence Of Being.

  3. #18
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    Kim Taylor is the one to ask about that one. His e-mail is listed under members.

  4. #19
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    Originally posted by heresjonny
    Sorry, I didn't read the small print properly, try the "Dotanuki Shinken" at <http://sdksupplies.netfirms.com/cat_shinken.htm>, that was the one I meant!
    Everyone I know who has ordered swords from SDK Supplies has been more than happy with them.

    Their Iaito are very well regarded. Their shinken are produced in Japan by a well regarded swordsmith (Kanefusa?), and are priced accordingly. I can't access their site from here at work ("weapons" are locked out), but I believe that the SDK Dotanuki are included among those produced by him.

    Again, going from memory only, I believe their Dotanuki had a very long kissaki, which might make it less desireable for Iai/Batto than a sword with chokissaki. Your sensei would be the best guide on suitablility, but I think you can be assured that the quality of the SDK swords is fine.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  5. #20
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    You are located in UK, and do iai and jo according to your profile. Ten escudos that you are affiliated with the BKA. if so, why not go to the shop that has supplied plenty of people in bka with all kind of equipment, nine circles? they have steel iaito that you can get with/without bohi, and all kind of other stuff


    Here is another uk shop, but I have no personal experience with them

    http://www.fudoshin.co.uk/catalog/index.php
    Roar Ulvestad

  6. #21
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    Originally posted by Brian Owens
    ...Their shinken are produced in Japan by a well regarded swordsmith (Kanefusa?), and ...I believe that the SDK Dotanuki are included among those produced by him.
    My memory was faulty. The SDK Dotanuki are made in China.

    Originally posted by Brian Owens
    ...I believe their Dotanuki had a very long kissaki, which might make it less desireable for Iai/Batto than a sword with chokissaki.
    That part was correct, other than a typo; it should have read, "...less desireable for Iai/Batto than a sword with chukissaki."
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  7. #22
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    You ask why not ninecircles? They may be reliable but I had no feedback on their shinken range. They also gave next to no description or pictures of their actual blades, so I had no decent idea just what blade I might have been spending a lot of money on. However, if anyone can show or send me some pictures or descriptions of ninecircles shinken, that would be a great help, especially if they can tell me if they're worth that little bit extra compared to say, last legend or hanwei...........
    Jonathan Freeman

    Correct Thought Is The Essence Of Being.

  8. #23
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    I have some pics of my nine circles sword from the "chuden"-range on my home computer, and I can post them this evening.

    My sword is with bohi, 2.4 shaku. 960 grams, wonderful balance, feels agile and quick, and it has a loud and nice tachikaze. The tsuka ito is nice and tight, the "diamonds" are small and regular. Compared to most standard alloy iaito I have handled, the tsuka is just a liiittle bit beefier, rather similar to the dotanuki-tsuka from tozando. Suit my hands perfect.
    It cost me about 1300usd, which is quite acceptable.
    Although it is possible to use it for all but the most challenging tameshigiri, I will reserve it for iai. For tameshigiri, I am going to line up in the "patiently awaiting the next shipment of shobu zukuri swords" queue over at bugei.com. Tameshigiri is not the major component in my practise, so I have no hurry.
    Roar Ulvestad

  9. #24
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    I was wrong about 1500usd, it was 2500
    Roar Ulvestad

  10. #25
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    The pics of my nine circles chuden sword:
    Roar Ulvestad

  11. #26
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    hamon
    Roar Ulvestad

  12. #27
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    Would you happen to know how many layers it has?

    How much does it way, with/without the saya?

    Also, one a side note, does anyone know what is a good ito? I've seen advertisments for leather, silk, cotton, suede etc. Which is the most comfortable and which has the best grip?
    Jonathan Freeman

    Correct Thought Is The Essence Of Being.

  13. #28
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    this is forged and not folded. No layers, that should not be essential with todays quality of steel, but folded gets you a wilder hamon. and a higher price.
    Roar Ulvestad

  14. #29
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    Originally posted by heresjonny
    ...Also, one a side note, does anyone know what is a good ito? I've seen advertisments for leather, silk, cotton, suede etc. Which is the most comfortable and which has the best grip?
    I have a tachi with a leather ito, rarely used and mostly for display.

    Most of the iaito I have used have had cotton ito. They hold up well enough, are comfortable, give good grip, etc. Relatively inexpensive to replace if they wear.

    I like silk the best, but it is a bit more expensive. It is very strong and wear-resistant, traditional looking, available in a wide variety of colors (if that matters to you; nothing wrong with basic black), etc.

    Suede? No.

    These are my personal preferences; others' may vary.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  15. #30
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    Originally posted by heresjonny
    Would you happen to know how many layers it has?
    Some people aren't clear on why Nihonto were/are folded, and what the layering does.

    Layering in and of itself doesn't make blades stronger, harder, sharper, etc.

    Like stirring pancake batter to make sure there are no clumps of dry flower in the mixture, folding and hammering billets of tamahagane (sword steel) was done to spread out the carbon deposits and other impurities in the iron ore without resorting to melting the metal in a crucible.

    Modern swords are often made from modern steels, which are already supplied in nearly homogeneous forms, and bladesmiths can order bars, billets, blanks, etc. with the precise characteristics they are looking for, so folding isn't required.

    Some smiths still fold their blades with different steels to acheive a particular look, but this is now more of an esthetic, rather than functionally required, pursuit.

    Layering should not be confused with laminating, which was done later in the smithing process. Laminating methods vary, but were/are ways of achieving different characteristics in different parts of the blade; for example a hard edge with a ductile back. As with forge folding, it is possible to achieve similar results by precise heat-treating a single-steel blade, but laminating allowed greater consistancy.

    You may have already known this, but since the topic came up I thought I'd pass that on.
    Last edited by Brian Owens; 22nd December 2004 at 07:10.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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