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Thread: Restoring pleats in hakama

  1. #16
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    Hey, cool.

    Thanks for the info, and thanks for letting me address you as Brian. I jsut dont want anyone mad at me. Also, good luck to your plans, I am thinking about majoring it in college, and teaching it here at the highschools.
    “To every man there comes a in his lifetime that special moment when he is figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing unique to him and fitted to his talent; what a tragedy if that moment finds him unprepared or unqualified for the work which would be his finest hour.”
    Sir Winston Churchill


    Matthew Gehrke

  2. #17
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    OT for this thread, but if you want to teach English in Japan and are still in college then it's in your best interest to get some schooling in Second Language Education or Teaching English as a Second Language or whatever other terms your school uses for the same sort of work. Just an ordinary English speaker isn't going to cut it for a decent paying English teaching job in Japan. I've known people who've moved back from there after being sorely disappointed that having a bachelor's degree wasn't enough for a livable teaching job. However, ESL teachers are in hot demand and if you have training or even better a degree in that field then you'll be worth some money.

    Another excellent alternative is to enroll in the JET program right after you've graduated so you can get practical experience in teaching. That will give you much more credibility in the English teaching market as well. JET takes people up to I think age 35? You're eligible if you have a BA or BS degree or equivalent, and are willing to live for a year in a backwater part of Japan. Japanese language skills aren't entirely necessary, but are an obvious plus. The JET program doesn't post people to major cities so don't expect to get a job in Kyoto or Osaka or Tokyo or something. More likely you'll get a job in a small town of under ten thousand people. They give you a few places to choose from, usually.

    As for going over to Japan without training in ESL and no connection already established with a school somewhere, you're shooting in the dark. You might get lucky and find someone who knows someone who runs a school, but more likely you'll get a job that barely affords you a squalid apartment and instant ramen. The days of random English speakers getting high paying jobs teaching English died with the Japanese economy in the early 90s.
    James A. Crippen

  3. #18
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    Originally posted by J. A. Crippen
    OT for this thread, but if you want to teach English in Japan and are still in college then it's in your best interest to get some schooling in Second Language Education or Teaching English as a Second Language or whatever other terms your school uses for the same sort of work....Another excellent alternative is to enroll in the JET program right after you've graduated so you can get practical experience in teaching. That will give you much more credibility in the English teaching market as well. JET takes people up to I think age 35?
    In my case, I'm way beyond the cut-off age for JET applicants. I am, however, planning on taking both Principles of Education (how to teach in general) and the TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) program.

    I'm hoping that, even at my advanced age, having a BA in English, a TESOL Certification, and an Endorsement in US/Japan Intercultural Fundamentals will give me enough credibility to allow me to earn my keep over there for a few years.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  4. #19
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    Having the TESOL certification should get you a job which pays enough to live off of. Not a great living, but if you're there for something else like budo then you'll be distracted enough not to care.

    I have a friend who is married to a Japanese gal from Sapporo and has a daughter. When the US economy tanked after the dot-com crash he moved to Japan to be near the family in Sapporo. He suffered pretty bad job-wise because of his lack of teaching certification, and couldn't get any other sort of job because he was a gaijin and not specialized enough to be more appealing than a Japanese candidate. She was making more money than him for some time, and this because she had good English! So they moved to Honolulu after a couple years and are now much happier. The daughter is far more happy in Honolulu than in Japan as well, being hafu.
    James A. Crippen

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