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Thread: "shinan"?

  1. #1
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    Default "shinan"?

    I've noticed "SHINAN" used on a couple of occasions...

    Does this usage arise because some wannabe misread an "h" for an "n" and didn't know the difference or is there actually a title, "SHINAN" that I'm just too inexperienced to have heard of?

    Thanks.

    Refs: http://www.e-budo.com/vbulletin/show...threadid=29528

    http://www.jiujitsujapones.com/
    Don J. Modesto
    Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
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    http://theaikidodojo.com/

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    They either spelled shihan wrong or they have a speech impediment.

    I don't think they confused it for w.


    Shinan Sharpe "Maestro de Maestros"


    yeah right.
    Saburo Kitazono

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    Originally posted by Saburo
    They either spelled shihan wrong or they have a speech impediment.
    Do you actually know the Japanese language?

    指南 【しなん】 (n,vs) instruction; teaching;
    指南番 【しなんばん】 (n) instructor
    指南役 【しなんやく】 (n) instructor

    Regards,

    r e n

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    Regards?

    That's a laugh.

    The "gentleman" using shinan on his webpage which also seems to promise a black belt after one year of instruction must have gotten the term from Jim Breen's site as well.
    Last edited by Saburo; 29th January 2005 at 20:40.
    Saburo Kitazono

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    After all he is a maestro of maestros and not just a lowly instructor.
    Saburo Kitazono

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    Wow, that is an....amazing page.
    OK, in this case, I seriously doubt he knows the difference between shinan and shihan.

    Regards,

    r e n

  7. #7
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    So, is SHINAN actually used in some quarters as a title or just as a description?

    Much obliged, gents.
    Don J. Modesto
    Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
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    http://theaikidodojo.com/

  8. #8
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    According to the "Kojien", 'shinan', composed of the 'shi' (= finger) in 'shidou' and 'nan' ( = south) means giving directions, instruction or guidance ( = 'oshiemichibiku'). A 'shinansho' is a place where it is carried out and a 'shinanyaku' is one who does it. A 'shinansha' is a vehicle used in ancient China with a compass attached and used for ascertaining directions (presumably it pointed ot the south). The only martial art where the term appears to be used is kendo. In aikido, certainly, the preferred term is 'shidou'.

    Best regards,
    Peter Goldsbury,
    Forum Administrator,
    Hiroshima, Japan

  9. #9
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    As always, incise. Thank you, Peter.
    Don J. Modesto
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    http://theaikidodojo.com/

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    Originally posted by P Goldsbury
    According to the "Kojien", 'shinan'...means giving directions, instruction or guidance ( = 'oshiemichibiku').

    A 'shinansho' is a place where it is carried out and a 'shinanyaku' is one who does it....
    Professor, a question if I may, just to clarify:

    Shinan is a verb meaning "giving instruction," correct?

    So it is not a title for instructor, as I understand it.

    But John Sharpe did seem to be using it as a title. His Web page (translated from Spanish) says:

    Shinan John Sharpe is an authority recognized internationally in the art of Jiu-Jitsu. He began his training in the martial arts in 1959, at the age of 11, and has continued with his training and study until today, at 47 years. He is a certified Doctor in the areas of Shiatsu and Acupuncture, and alternative medicine.
    That would not be correct use, would it?

    Also, regarding shidou, wouldn't one who does it be shidoin?

    TIA.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  11. #11
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    'Shinan' is a noun, usually requiring the verb 'suru'. Here is the definition given in the big Kokugo Daijiten (Vol 6, p914):

    ("Shinansha ga houko shiji wo suru) houko, tsuuro nado wo sashishimesu koto. Mata, hiyuteki ni hito wo oshiemichibiku koto. Sono oshie. Tebiki. Mata, oshiemichibiku mono ya yaku. Shinanban."

    = "Direction, pointing the way with the finger, (the direction pointed by the shinansha (direction-pointing vehicle). Figuratively, pointing the way to someone. The direction that is given. Guidance. The person who points the way. gives directions.")

    The definition of shinanban is given: "bakufu ya daimyo nado ni tsukaete, bugei nado wo kyoujuu suru yaku. Mata. sono hito. Shinanyaku." = "An office or position used by the bakufu or daimyo for teaching the marshall skills etc. Someone who holds this office. Shinanyaku. Shinan."

    The compounds given are:
    shinangao, shinankyoku, shinanshi, shinansha (with illustration), shinanjo, shinanshin, shinandokoro, shinanban, shinanbou, shinanya, shinanyaku, and shinanryoku.

    Best regards,
    Peter Goldsbury,
    Forum Administrator,
    Hiroshima, Japan

  12. #12
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    The compounds of shidou are:
    shidou-an, shidou-in, shidou-kyoukan, shidou-kyouju, shidou-genri, shidou-sha, shidousha-genri.

    Best regards,
    Peter Goldsbury,
    Forum Administrator,
    Hiroshima, Japan

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    And just to prove that there's more than one way to do it, in my line of Mugairyu all sensei are shidoin, but not all shidoin are sensei. One becomes a shidoin when one receives "shidoin shikaku", one is called sensei when one receives menkyo.

    Sensei are called "sensei" or "Tanaka-sensei", etc. However shidoin are called, depending on the situation, Bashocho, Tanaka-san, etc.

    Regards,

    r e n

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    Originally posted by P Goldsbury
    'Shinan'...Here is the definition given in the big Kokugo Daijiten (Vol 6, p914):...The person who points the way.

    The definition of shinanban is given: "An office or position used by the bakufu or daimyo for teaching the marshall (sic) skills etc. Someone who holds this office....Shinan."
    Well, live and learn. I stand corrected.

    But I still find this "Maestro de Maestros" to be baffling.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  15. #15
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    Why should you be baffled? Anybody who calls himself the "Master of Masters" is obviously a fake. I mean, just look at his hasso no kamae. That's all you need to know.

    And such a person is not going to have any idea how to properly use the various Japanese terms associated with teaching budo. He's going to find something he thinks sounds cool, say to himself "This ought to fool all of the yokels. They've never heard it before, so they'll think it's all spooky and mystical; it they ask I'll just tell them it's a secret term from the Detarame Ryu. They'll never know the difference".

    It's just something to pull the wool over the eyes of people he's trying to con out of their money.
    Earl Hartman

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