Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Sword History Link from Japan to Korea

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Lindenhurst, Illinois
    Posts
    1,114
    Likes (received)
    0

    Lightbulb

    Is anyone looking for a challenge?

    The MU YEI TO BO TONG JI (“COMPREHENSIVE ILLUSTRATED MANUAL OF MARTIAL ARTS”) was written by Lee in the 1790-s by order of Jungjo, the Korean King. It is a compendium of many (over 200 treatises, books and works) sources dating back as far as 1595. I raise this bit of trivia in that Book 2, section 3 of this work is entitled WAE GUEM (“JAPANESE SWORD”). Originally I had thought this material was Korean/Chinese in origin with the intent of formulating responses to Japanese sword techniques. Introductory notes to the chapter, however, indicate that “ During the period of King Sukjong,(1674-1720)…. (Kim, Che-gun)… traveled to Japan with the Korean government delegation and acquired a sword manual. When he mastered it, the king called him in and tested his skills….. In the sword manual there were four styles: toyu ryu, woonkwang ryu, chunryu ryu and ryupee ryu. The style of Ui Kyung was called shindo ryu and Shinkangs’ shinum ryu. Kim Che-gum transmitted all of the systems but currently only woonkwang ryu is practiced. What he developed based on what he had learned was called kyo jun bo. …..The Japanese are the best in sword patterns, thus their patterns are used in the illustrations.”

    So sometime between 1674 and 1720 a delegation goes to Japan and brings back the material presented in the MU YEI… the obvious question is any of this familiar to any of the current practitioners of Japanese arts? Looking at the first Form (TOYU RYU) I think I see vestiges of Katori Shinto Ryu as presented in DEITY AND THE SWORD. Does anyone want to venture a guess at what other styles might have been available to a Korean delegation in writing in that time frame?

    Best Wishes,

    Bruce W Sims
    http://www.midwesthapkido.com
    Bruce W Sims
    www.midwesthapkido.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    JAPAN
    Posts
    1,616
    Likes (received)
    108

    Default


    So sometime between 1674 and 1720 a delegation goes to Japan and brings back the material presented in the MU YEI?Ethe obvious question is any of this familiar to any of the current practitioners of Japanese arts?
    Best Wishes,

    Bruce W Sims
    http://www.midwesthapkido.com
    ..............
    Some info not exactly answering your question but.....

    There is a museum about 2 hours drive from here devoted entirely to close links with Japan and Korea. Nagoya town is geographicaly closest to Korea (Nagoya Kyushu).

    Hideyoshi spent quite some time here at Nagoya Castle.

    The main thing brought over from Korea particular to the area is the pottery style. The local pottery is now famous within its own right. They have a replica of a sword on display about 3.4 in length. The Tsuka binding is somewhat different with a tassel on the hilt. I made enquiries into this which were in turn were sent to Korea. The answer was that most of the swordsmanship in Korea connected to Japan was the result of visiting pirates.

    Hyakutake Colin

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Posts
    82
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Please see my response to the version of this post that appears in the Sword Arts section of the Koryu forum. I believe the thread is titled "brainteaser."
    William Bodiford
    Professor
    Dept. of Asian Languages & Cultures
    UCLA

Similar Threads

  1. Grandmaster Soto/ daitoryu.com challenge
    By M.C. Busman in forum Aikijujutsu
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 24th December 2007, 18:18
  2. Sf Sword Society Racism
    By Baio in forum Member's Lounge
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 9th May 2007, 20:55
  3. Remains of kidnapped girl returned to Japan
    By Kimpatsu in forum News from Japan
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 5th December 2004, 05:01
  4. Innovation
    By Tim Shaw in forum Karate Archive
    Replies: 76
    Last Post: 25th March 2003, 09:23

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •