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Thread: Budo: The Art of Killing -- Cast info sought

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    Default Budo: The Art of Killing -- Cast info sought

    Greetings all.

    I am putting together a short bio on the many Budoka featured in the documentary Budo: The Art of Killing.

    In the film, the featured players are never identified by name, and the credits at the end only name the key contributors.

    I'm hoping to get as much detail as I can on all practitioners who have any screen time. If any of you know the particulars on any of the cast, I'd like you to share it here.

    I'll start off by naming those given credits on the film.

    Kendo (includes Kendo, Iaido, Kenjutsu, etc.):
    Kazutora Toyoshima
    Tomoo Koide
    Taizaburo Nakamura
    Tasaburo Tokutomi

    Karate-do:
    Teruo Hayashi
    Shogo Kuniba
    Sadaharu Fujimoto
    Satoru Suzuki

    Judo:
    Isao Okano

    Aikido:
    Gozo Shioda

    Naginata-do:
    Fumiko Noda

    Sumo-do:
    Uragoro Takasago

    Yabusame:
    Iekata Kaneko
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    In several of the scenes featuring karate or Ryukyu kobudo, the teacher referred to only as "The Master" in the film is my former teacher's teacher, Teruo Hayashi. He is shown demonstrating a crane form, leading a group kata in the snow, and -- wearing a black uniform -- demonstrating several Okinawan weapons.

    Hayashi Sensei is the Soke of Hayashi-ha Shito Ryu and Kenshin Ryu.

    I don't know the name of the man working with him on the weapons demos. Any help would be appreciated.

    The scene of the karateka breaking the beer bottles is, I believe, Shogo Kuniba Sensei.

    The scenes of the swordsman cutting suspended straw targets, as well as the dramatic "beheading" at the end of the film, are of the late Taizaburo Nakamura, of Toyama Ryu and Nakamura Ryu.

    The short-haired gentleman in the white uniform shown joining the Zen monks in meditation, cutting live bamboo in the grove, etc. has been identified as Shuji Matsushita of Shin Shin Muso Ryu and Mei Shin Muso Ryu. Any information on the long-haired gentleman he is frequently seen with, and the Jodo practitioner also seen in this sequence would be most appreciated.

    That's all for now. Hope to see this thread grow in detail soon.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    Brian,

    The long-haired gentleman with Matsushita-sensei is his sempai. I was told his name is "Fukia-sempai". Nothing more. Don't know how much that helps, but I didn't want to really drill for details. My sempai asked sensei for me, so I just accepted the answer.

    Tom
    Tom DeAngelo
    "If you fall down seven times, get up eight."

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    Default

    Thanks. That's a start.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

  5. #5
    Motobu-Ha Guest

    Default Kuniba Sensei

    The gentleman performing the weapons with hayashi Sensei is Kuniba Sensei.
    Kuniba Sensei is the Soke of Motobu-Ha Shito-Ryu Karate-Do.
    Kuniba and Hayashi were both students of Mabuni Kenwa Sensei the Soke of Shito-Ryu.
    Kuniba and hayashi trained together for most of there lives and were close friends. Much of what the practice they shared with each other.
    The gentleman performing the Aikido demonstration is Shioda Gozo Sensei.
    I hope this helps.
    Yours In Budo
    Jay Bainter

  6. #6
    Motobu-Ha Guest

    Default Additional Kuniba

    Kuniba Sensei was also a student of Shioda Sensei
    Kuniba Sensei also founded:
    Kuniba-Ryu Goshin-Do (a self defense system)
    Kuniba-Ryu Iaido (based off of Mugai-Ryu Iaido)
    Kuniba-Ryu Kobudo
    He was listed as 9th Dan in each when he passed away in 1992.
    He was given 10th Dan posthumously by the Japan Karate Federation.

    Also I believe the beer bottle man is Suzuki Sensei, I'll have to watch it again.
    I don't remember. Does he wear a Dove patch on his Gi? I believe Suzuki Sensei is a top Wado-Ryu karateka.

  7. #7
    Motobu-Ha Guest

    Default More Kuniba info

    Shogo Kuniba was born near Mt. Fuji in Yamanashi-Shi, Japan, February 5, 1935 to a family descended from the Okinawan Sho Shi Royal family line. He began his martial arts training in 1940 at the age of five under his father, Kosei Kokuba, who in 1947 had become the Soke of Motobu-Ha Shito-Ryu. Shogo Kuniba, Sensei trained with many of the greatest teachers ever known to the martial arts, including Mabuni Kenwa, Sensei (Shito-Ryu), Shinken Taira, Sensei (Taira Kobudo), Nagamine Shoshin, Sensei (Shorin-Ryu), Itoh Asakichi, Sensei (Judo), Shioda Gozo, Sensei (Aikido) and many others. Mabuni Kenwa, Sensei ,the founder of Shito-Ryu Karate-do, came from Okinawa to live in Osaka around the time young Shogo Kuniba turned age ten. Mabuni, Sensei trained young Kuniba in Shito-ryu aided by Mabuni, Sensei's old friend Kokuba Kosei, (young Kuniba's father) who was also from Okinawa. When Shogo Kuniba was 12 he was promoted to Shodan by Mabuni, Sensei.

    Shogo Kuniba also studied privately with other well known Sensei of many martial arts as his father's home in Osaka, Japan was a familier meeting place for all martial artists. In 1943 Kokuba Kosei, Sensei founded the SEISHIN-KAN (Pure Heart Dojo) which was to become his son's only legacy. After alot of interest this organization was later changed to SEISHIN-KAI ( Pure Heart Organization).

    In 1950, Shogo Kuniba was promoted to Nidan, by Mabuni, Sensei. In 1952 he was promoted to Sandan by Mabuni, Sensei and began training in Mugai-ryu Iaido, the way of the sword, with Ishii Gogetsu, Soke at Sakai City. In 1955 Shogo Kuniba was promoted to Yondan, by Mabuni, Sensei and he began additional Karate training in Naha City, Okinawa, with Nagamine Shoshin, Sensei. While in Okinawa, Shogo Kuniba also studied Kobudo (weapons) with the infamous Taira Shinken, Sensei and Nakaima Kenko, Sensei. He learned the use of the "Bo" (staff 6') and the "Nunchaku" (joined sticks) under Kosha Shojin, Sensei. With Yamaguchi Junko, Sensei he studied the "Tonfa" (spinning sticks). Shogo Kuniba, Soke was the first Karateka to demonstrate Okinawan Kobudo technique in Japan.

    In 1956 Shogo Kuniba returned to his father's homeland of Okinawa where he trained in the Shorin-ryu style of Nagamine Shojin, Sensei.

    In 1957, Shogo Kuniba published his first book on Karate, "Karate-Do Bin Ran".

    In 1958, he was promoted to the rank of Godan, in Motobu-ha Karate-do; Yondan in Iaido and Rokudan, in Kobudo. During this time Shogo Kuniba became the first office manager (Shodai Jimu Kyokucho) for the Nippon Karate-do Rengo-Kai (Federation of All Japan Karate-do Organizations, FAJKO). Shogo Kuniba was instrumental in the formation of this organization and in developing criteria used for ranking all Karateka and for helping to develop tournament rules for competition. Shogo Kuniba, Soke remained a special advisor to Rengo Kai until his passing away in 1992.

    Upon his death on October 17 1959, Kosei Kokuba passed the leadership of Motobu-Ha Karate-Do on to his son Shogo Kuniba. This appointment was made "official" by the Shihan Board of Seishin-Kai that Shogo Kuniba would become the 3rd Soke for Motobu-ha and the first soke of Motobu-ha Shito-ryu which is his own creation from a blending of the styles which he was taught. At the age of 24, he became the youngest person to ever hold the title of "Soke" (The Family Head), for a Karate style, a distiction which remains true even today. Today in Japan there are only five, maybe six, elderly gentleman who hold the position of Soke and are ranked as such by the Zen Nippon Karate-Do Renmei (JFK).Upon becoming "Soke", Kosho Kokuba had his Okinawan name changed to "Shogo" whose Japanese Kanji characters mean "strong warrior". In Japan the Kanji characters for Kokuba, is pronounced as Kuniba.



    In 1962, Kuniba, Soke was promoted by the Nippon Karate-do Rengo Kai, to the rank of Rokudan,(6th Dan), in Karate-do. He was also promoted to Rokudan, in Iaido, and Nanadan, (7th Dan) in Kobudo.

    In 1964, Kuniba, Soke was featured in the encyclopedia Japonica in an article concerning Karate-do and Kobudo.

    In 1966, he was promoted by the Nippon Karate-do Rengo Kai, to the rank of Nanadan in Karate.

    In 1968, Shogo Kuniba, Soke became Seishin-Kai Kaicho (President), relieving Teruo Hayashi, Shihan.

    In 1970, Shogo Kuniba, Soke was selected by the Nippon Karate-Do Rengo Kai, as the only representative of Japanese Karate-Do at the Second World War Karate-Do Championships Tournament held in Paris, France. Kuniba, Soke gave a demonstration at the tournament.

    In 1973, Shogo Kuniba, Soke was promoted to the rank of Hachidan, (8th Dan), in Karate-Do, Iaido, Kobudo and Goshin Budo. Goshin Budo is a combination of all the arts that Kuniba, Soke has trained in, for example, Karate-Do, Judo, Aikido and Jiu Jitsu.

    In 1976, Kuniba, Soke appeared in the Japanese documentary movie "EIEN NARUBUDO" (Eternal Martial Arts). This film was shown on USA Cinemax TV in 1983, under the title, "BUDO: GREAT MASTERS OF THE MARTIAL ARTS", and is available on video tape in most video stores under the title: "BUDO: GREAT MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE". In 1979, the Miami Film Festival Award went to "EIEN NARUBUDO" (Budo: Great Masters of the Universe), for the Best Documentary Film of 1978. In addition to Karate work, Kuniba, Soke was the first in Japan to choreograph fighting scenes at the famous Toei Stagio in Kyoto where the USA movie, "SHOGUN", was filmed. For years, Kuniba, Soke was employed by Toei as a talent scout for actors for martial arts movies. Many of his students found their way into the movies. For example, Sonny Chiba, Hiroshi Miyauchi and Yasunori Kurata.

    In 1983, Kuniba, Soke opened the USA Hombu Dojo in Portsmouth, Virginia, and made the USA his primary home and base of operations. from Portsmouth, Soke concentrated his efforts on teaching his style of Karate to the world and traveled to many other countries to do so.

    In 1984, Shogo Kuniba, Soke was promoted to the rank of Kudan, (9th Dan) in Karate-Do and Goshin-Do by the Rengo-Kai. At that time he held the highest rank with the JKF of any Japanese martial artist living outside the country of Japan.

    In 1985 Kuniba, Soke was featured in Who's Who in American Martial Arts, Founding Fathers of American Martial Arts and Shogo Kuniba: The Limitless Art of Goshin Budo.

    After 1985, Shogo Kuniba, Soke was appointed to the technical committee for P.U.K.O., which is the part of W.U.K.O. that includes North, South and Central America. Each year after, he taught at clinics and gave demonstrations at Ozawa, Sensei's Traditional Karate Tournament held in Las Vegas. Ozawa, Sensei's Tournament may be the largest Karate tournament held inthe U.S.A.. Kuniba, Soke was featured in several magazine articles in the USA and also targeted in the French magazine, Karate. In Europe he was a member and technical advisor to the UNAAK, French Martial Arts Association.

    Shogo Kuniba, Soke adhered to the teaching and philosophies of the Okinawan masters from whom he was descended. He believed and taught that the true goals of Karate-Do are the development of Patience, Self-discipline, Humanity and Inner Strength (Qi).

    On July 14, 1992 at approximately 2:05 a.m. Shogo Kuniba, Soke passed away after a long hard battle with stomach cancer. It is the only battle he ever lost! Soke Shogo Kuniba is missed greatly and remembered daily. Shogo Kuniba, Soke was awarded Judan, (10th Dan), posthumously by the Japan Karate Federation (JKF). He is one of only maybe 5 KarateKa, from Okinawa and Japan to recieve this rank.

    Through his training in the various styles of martial arts, Kuniba, Soke developed his own style, Kuniba-Ha Shito-Ryu, which combines the strengths and combats the weaknesses of the various martial art styles. Kuniba, Soke continued to train and develop new techniques until his passing away on July 14, 1992.

    I hope this helps

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    Quote Originally Posted by Motobu-Ha
    The gentleman performing the weapons with hayashi Sensei is Kuniba Sensei.
    Thank you.

    You confirmed what I had recently discovered and was in the process of double-checking.

    Quote Originally Posted by Motobu-Ha
    ...Also I believe the beer bottle man is Suzuki Sensei...
    Almost. Satoru Suzuki Sensei is in the film, but is not the beer bottle breaker.

    Satoru Suzuki Sensei, All Japan Karate-do Federation, is the man who demonstrates the nunchaku; there is a scene where he breaks boards suspended by ropes, and another where he strikes a bo held vertically by an assistant, for example.

    Sadaharu Fujimoto Sensei, International Karate-do Shobukai, is the one who breaks the beer bottles, concrete slabs, a thrown board, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Motobu-Ha
    The gentleman performing the Aikido demonstration is Shioda Gozo Sensei.
    Yes; that's in the credits listed above.

    Shioda Sensei was the founder of Aikido Yoshinkan, the official martial art of the Tokyo Metropolitan Police.

    Thanks again for the information on Kuniba Sensei.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    Here's a link to an Interview with David Lynch, one of the few foreigners who is featured prominently although briefly in the film's aikido section shortly before Shioda.

    http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache...budo%22+&hl=en

    Apparentally he didn't like the film very much.

    Are you sure that it is not Suzuki of the Wado Ryu doing the breaking? I thought it was... but my memory often fails me! I'll have to go back and take another look at it.

    I know it is Nakamura doing the bulk of the 'cutting' segments in the film but I often wanted to clarify who was the budoka who was lopping down the bamboo forest in that film? He also practises kenjutsu kata and kendo bogu training (they also throw him in the zen temple to round things out.) in the film. I liked the idea of the breadth of the practise he was involved in.

    Incidentally, it is available with a new title "Eternal Budo" through budovideos.com as a dvd.
    Matthew Rogers
    Scarborough Martial Arts Training Group
    http://www.spiritforging.com

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    You were perfectly correct about the breaking karateka. Here is you man:

    http://www.shoubukai.com/800/index2.html

    Perhaps that is a still from that very film!
    Matthew Rogers
    Scarborough Martial Arts Training Group
    http://www.spiritforging.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mateo
    You were perfectly correct about the breaking karateka.
    Yep, that's him. Fujimoto Sensei.

    Thanks.



    Last edited by Brian Owens; 29th August 2005 at 02:40.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mateo
    ...I know it is Nakamura doing the bulk of the 'cutting' segments in the film but I often wanted to clarify who was the budoka who was lopping down the bamboo forest in that film? He also practises kenjutsu kata and kendo bogu training (they also throw him in the zen temple to round things out.) in the film. I liked the idea of the breadth of the practise he was involved in. ...
    Yes; much thanks to a member who sent me a PM identifying him as Shuji Matsushita of Shin Shin Muso Ryu and Mei Shin Muso Ryu. I enjoyed the scenes where he was puting together a cutting target of rice straw, getting smacked by the kaishaku at the Zen center, and especially the very dynamic 1-against-2 sword demo.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mateo
    Here's a link to an Interview with David Lynch, one of the few foreigners who is featured prominently although briefly in the film's aikido section shortly before Shioda. ...Apparentally he didn't like the film very much. ...
    Quote Originally Posted by David Lynch
    First, let me confess I am (was) the guy being thrown around by Gozo in that movie and later briefly chucking someone else. The aikido is one of the few worthwhile bits in that film - which otherwise went to tedious length showing karateka bashing railway trains and sumotori brutalising one another - not to mention the head-lopping swordsmanship bits.

    When the film was being shot at the Yoshinkan, Shioda Sensei called me to take part, even though I was no longer a regular student of his. This was fine except that when I was taking ukemi for him the director kept saying, "Would you mind doing that again!"

    Cor! It was incredibly hot, I recall, and I also had a kidney stone forming which was diagnosed next day when I was taken to hospital. A painful memory.

    My judo mate and I were invited to the preview of the film in Tokyo and I am afraid we must have horrified the producers as they asked our opinion and we gave it to them! The Japanese title of the film was "Eien Budo" (Eternal Budo) which we thought was fair enough, so why would they make the English title, "The Art of Killing"? The emphasis on blood and guts did not appeal to us, and we told them so, thus ensuring no further invitations to previews, I guess.
    LOL! Yeah, that wouldn't put him in the good graces of the producers, would it.

    I, too, thought the scenes of Fujimoto Sensei whacking the steam engine and such were over-done -- to "artsy fartsy" as they say. I did find most of the film to be interesting -- even fascinating at times. The Aikido was definitely not the only "worthwhile bit" for me.
    Yours in Budo,
    ---Brian---

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    I did find most of the film to be interesting -- even fascinating at times. The Aikido was definitely not the only "worthwhile bit" for me.[/QUOTE]

    Oh not by a long shot. 10 years after having having seen it I remembered Okano-sensei trading throws with his stalwart judo partner in that film. And at that point in time I think that was the first time I had ever watched classical sword kata.

    What I'm really surprised at is no one has mentioned the soundtrack! All those wah-wahs. They must have already sounded dated when the film was made!

    I, like Lynch, didn't really care for the original title or the emphasis on 'killing' and ritual suicide in the dramatic 'jidai geki' scenes but there is plenty that is worthwhile there.
    Matthew Rogers
    Scarborough Martial Arts Training Group
    http://www.spiritforging.com

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    Default Belated thanks and Mei Shin Muso Ryu Query

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Owens
    Yes; much thanks to a member who sent me a PM identifying him as Shuji Matsushita of Shin Shin Muso Ryu and Mei Shin Muso Ryu. I enjoyed the scenes where he was puting together a cutting target of rice straw, getting smacked by the kaishaku at the Zen center, and especially the very dynamic 1-against-2 sword demo.
    I should really have thanked you and the anonymous member who provided this infomation as I had been wondering about who exactly that was and the name of their tradition for the last 20 years.

    The idea of a tradition that practises iai, kenjutsu, and cutting (like Ko ryu) and bogu training (like gendai budo) is very appealing to me.

    There is also a long haired gentleman in the film partnered with Mr. Matsushita. Is he credited in the film?

    Does anyone have any information about the Mei Shin Muso Ryu? I did a search but came up with little except that Shuji Matsushita seems to have taught in Pensylvania at one point.
    Matthew Rogers
    Scarborough Martial Arts Training Group
    http://www.spiritforging.com

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