Likes Likes:  0
Page 10 of 13 FirstFirst ... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 LastLast
Results 136 to 150 of 186

Thread: "Aunkai" / Akuzawa Minoru (Jin)

  1. #136
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Hiroshima, Japan.
    Posts
    2,550
    Likes (received)
    151

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesigman@eart
    The elements of these things are actually codified, to a greater or lesser extent, in some Japanese literature and a lot of Chinese literature. There could be no codification if these were loose and subjectively interpretted phenomena. I could go to some of the literature by and about Ueshiba and grab a number of instances where he is using long-established terms to describe these phenomena.
    Mr Sigman,

    I have followed the discussions about Ueshiba in this forum and in the Aikiweb and AJ forums. I do not have any knowledge of Chinese sources because I do not read Chinese, but I can read and understand Japanese and am familiar with the writings of Morihei Ueshiba. You have suggested that John Stevens, for example, mistranslated Ueshiba's douka because he did not understand the 'code words' that Ueshiba was supposedly using. So it might be that I, also, have mistranslated Ueshiba.

    Apart from Stevens, other persons who have translated Ueshiba's writings into English are Kazuaki Tanahashi & Roy Maurer Jr (working as a pair) in the 1975 Aikido volume written by Kisshomaru Ueshiba, and Larry & Seiko Bieri (also working as a pair), who translated Budo Renshu . Since their translations appear to be similar to those of John Stevens in certain crucial respects, it might be that they also have mistranslated Ueshiba.

    So, since your position is clearly against the current, so to speak, perhaps you need to give more evidence . I have seen little evidence, as far (unless I have missed anything in Aikiweb or AJ). The Japanese language texts by Ueshiba with which I am familiar are Takemusu Aiki, first published in 1986, and Aiki Shinzui, published in 2002.

    I am more interested in writings by Ueshiba himself than writings about Ueshiba, since it might be that the authors of these writings misinterpreted Ueshiba. Thank you in advance.

    To Mr Scott,

    This thread is about Aunkai / Akuzawa, but I have made the above post here because Mr Sigman himself raised the matter (see quote). I am quite happy if you split this thread into two or more parts, since the discussion about Ueshiba's writings might become rather intricate and be of little appeal to those who do not understand Japanese.

    Best wishes,
    Peter Goldsbury,
    Forum Administrator,
    Hiroshima, Japan

  2. #137
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    824
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Scott
    I would gladly pay you Tuesday to see Mr. Akuzawa fight in the K-1 today. I figure no matter how you look at it, it would be a good time.
    Akuzawa san is 39 years old, I believe. He's a bit too vintage for that kind of thing, I think. But he has a student named Rob who's just about the right age...I nominate him.
    David Orange, Jr.

    -------------------------------------------------------

    "That which has no substance can enter where there is no room."
    Lao Tzu

  3. #138
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Durango, Colorado
    Posts
    187
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Peter, I'll move this discussion to a more suitable venue, since it's tangential to the current thread. I'll put it in "Aikido".

    Regards,

    Mike Sigman

  4. #139
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA USA
    Posts
    2,570
    Likes (received)
    44

    Default

    Mr. Goldsbury,

    No worries. Nice to hear from you again.

    Mr. Sigman,

    It sounds like we understand each other for the most part, and I've got no problem agreeing to disagree, but I think there is one point that I haven't been successful with:

    In other words, everyone is talking about a recognized and described set of phenomena, but you're positing (I assume) some sort of "secrets" that somehow involve some of the basic elements of so-called "internal" strength and yet exceed the basic parameters. It would be interesting to hear, even vaguely, of an example of that.
    Each of the koryu has a set of "secrets", which I prefer to call internal transmission (mongai fushutsu) so that it does not sound too melodramatic or paranoid. They are an intergral part of koryu, even if a ryu-ha's secrets end up being common knowledge to the rest of the world. The fact that others don't know what the "gokui" of your art is becomes more important than the gokui itself (in many cases), giving the exponents of the art an edge.

    Anyway, in regards to talking about stuff my basic point is not that there are secret internal methods that you don't know about (though that could be as well), but that it is possible that an exponent of one art could be thinking of something different than you when trying to use discuss experiences using common terminology. How could you possibly expect to have a 100% clear understanding of the internal principles you're talking about when many of them are ones you all have termed and defined yourself without demonstrating them on the rest of us hands on first? Yes, once you've hooked up with someone, showed them what your doing, and said "I call this grounding", you have a common framework to speak within. I suggest you tour the world and hold seminars so that all of us hanging out on the internet may formulate a common frame of reference!

    I'm suggesting that outer techniques, such as kotegaeshi or tsubamegaeshi, can be explained reasonably. Internal forms must be felt to ensure that we are talking about the same thing. There is no guarentee that we are, even if it may appear similar by looking at it being performed.

    Japanese terminology is often somewhat standardized, at least these days, but was not always so, and many still are being used with different meanings or have different meanings based on the context it is being used within. Kokyu is an example of this. As another example, some arts define aiki simply as the situation in which you and your opponent mirror each others postures physically. Some use different kanji for the same thing homophone, which may not be here or there, or, may be quite significant.

    Anyway, I hope my point is a little clearer. Back to the off-topic discussions,
    Last edited by Nathan Scott; 4th March 2006 at 06:22.
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

  5. #140
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Durango, Colorado
    Posts
    187
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Scott
    Each of the koryu has a set of "secrets", which I prefer to call internal transmission (mongai fushutsu) so that it does not sound too melodramatic or paranoid. They are an intergral part of koryu, even if a ryu-ha's secrets end up being common knowledge to the rest of the world. The fact that others don't know what the "gokui" of your art is becomes more important than the gokui itself (in many cases), giving the exponents of the art an edge.

    Anyway, in regards to talking about stuff my basic point is not that there are secret internal methods that you don't know about (though that could be as well), but that it is possible that an exponent of one art could be thinking of something different than you when trying to use discuss experiences using common terminology. How could you possibly expect to have a 100% clear understanding of the internal principles you're talking about when many of them are ones you all have termed and defined yourself without demonstrating them on the rest of us hands on first? Yes, once you've hooked up with someone, showed them what your doing, and said "I call this grounding", you have a common framework to speak within. I suggest you tour the world and hold seminars so that all of us hanging out on the internet may formulate a common frame of reference!
    I take your points, although I don't see the need for the digressions into personal commentary.
    I'm suggesting that outer techniques, such as kotegaeshi or tsubamegaeshi, can be explained reasonably. Internal forms must be felt to ensure that we are talking about the same thing. There is no guarentee that we are, even if it may appear similar by looking at it being performed.

    Japanese terminology is often somewhat standardized, at least these days, but was not always so, and many still are being used with different meanings or have different meanings based on the context it is being used within. Kokyu is an example of this. As another example, some arts define aiki simply as the situation in which you and your opponent mirror each others postures physically. Some use different kanji for the same thing homophone, which may not be here or there, or, may be quite significant.

    Anyway, I hope my point is a little clearer. Back to the off-topic discussions,
    I see your point, sort of, but I think the whole "koryu" thing often gets inflated. Most of the koryu appear to be "mini-martial-arts-styles" and in effect are no different than any other "martial-art-style". They have (1.)techniques and strategies and they have (2.) training and conditioning methods. We're talking about (2.), at the moment.

    Looking at Karl Friday's book "Legacies of the Sword", I see essentially a form of "mini-style" and I see that although he doesn't appear to understand the references and history of some of his own commentary about conditioning and training, the style also involves some of the standard ki and kokyu training. Those trainings have a reasonably finite number of expressions and the logic tying them together is, as I opined, pretty much immutable. I.e., there are only a certain number of things he can do with them and the development of them follows a certain logic. Mr. Friday mentions using reiki-no-ho for development of the same power that "kokyu ho dosa" would do in Aikido. This form of kokyu development (or its variations) seems to be fairly common throughout the koryu arts. The words may shift slightly in Japanese, but probably the case you're mentioning in English about different terms can be for a variety of reasons. The point is, I think there's a commonality and I'd be surprised, based on the samples I now know of, if there was anything truly unusual in terms of training and conditioning in the koryu.

    Not that I know it all, either. There can be extraordinary body-tricks like the startle-shaking of Southern White Crane injected into various martial arts... but my point is that until I'm shown some major difference from the general principles, the evidence seems to support the idea that commonalities prevail.

    All the Best.

    Mike Sigman

  6. #141
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA USA
    Posts
    2,570
    Likes (received)
    44

    Default

    Mr. Sigman,

    I don't see the need for the digressions into personal commentary.
    It wasn't my intention to attack you personally in my comments. I was simply trying to speak objectively, allowing for various possibilities in both directions. I don't presume that you are new to the arts or inexperienced. I'm sorry if you took it that way. I have also been around for a while, and have experience in CMA, but would be the first to acknowledge that there may be something in CMA that I'm not aware of, based on things like differences in training methods and differences in using the body.

    Thinking of koryu as mini-arts may be a good way of thinking of them, and I agree that koryu arts do get inflated. There are what we call "koryu wankers", and then there are those who don't study or understand koryu, projecting their own experience base on what they think it is, and as a result get defensive and pissed off when told things that are different than they expect or when told that certain things will not be explained. Two sides to every coin.

    I know Professor Friday's book well. FWIW, there is one big difference between reiki no ho and kokyu dosa, from what I've gathered. Reiki no ho is trained differently with a slightly different focus on development. The shite in reiki no ho, at least in the beginning levels, apparently raises their hands up until uke's hands break off their wrists. There are things you would learn from this that you would not learn from the kokyu dosa in aikido, which is nearly a pointless exercise (the way it is done). But yeah, they probably would produce similar results if performed correctly (aside from what I noted).

    Anyway, it sounds like we understand each other. You would rather risk the possibility of miscommunicating with others about these techniques and principles, assuming that more than likely you already know what Aunkai methods and Daito-ryu aiki is, than play it safe and talk to a select few about your observations after having had hands on exchanges to establish a solid frame of reference. Fair enough ya'll. Have at it. Either way you might meet some interesting people along the way.

    Off to the dojo,
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

  7. #142
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Durango, Colorado
    Posts
    187
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Scott
    It wasn't my intention to attack you personally in my comments. I was simply trying to speak objectively, allowing for various possibilities in both directions. I don't presume that you are new to the arts or inexperienced. I'm sorry if you took it that way. I have also been around for a while, and have experience in CMA, but would be the first to acknowledge that there may be something in CMA that I'm not aware of, based on things like differences in training methods and differences in using the body.
    I didn't say anything about an "attack". I just think that we can discuss the current topic without making veiled references to each other. That's usually how topics deteriorate and why moderators are needed. For instance, there's no need for me to make oblique references about you, my impressions of you, your style, or whatever, as long as there is an exchange of valid information about the topic, right?
    Thinking of koryu as mini-arts may be a good way of thinking of them, and I agree that koryu arts do get inflated. There are what we call "koryu wankers", and then there are those who don't study or understand koryu, projecting their own experience base on what they think it is, and as a result get defensive and pissed off when told things that are different than they expect or when told that certain things will not be explained. Two sides to every coin.
    Well, then I suggest that there would be less misunderstanding if factual commentary and rebuttal is offered, rather than the "you wouldn't understand" stuff. True, many things have to be felt, but if I'm speaking with an obviously experienced (from reading a number of knowledgeable commentaries leaving no other conclusion) martial artist who knows the various training methods, principles, etc., I don't feel I have to toss everything into the "you wouldn't know unless I showed you" bin.

    For instance, within the wider purview of Asian martial arts that uses these ki and "kei"/kokyu types of body skills/conditioning, the idea of "aiki" is not unknown at all. I think I posted an example of Chen Fa Ke using the essential "aiki" to neutralize a wrestler on another thread somewhere on E-Budo. If someone wants to say it's not "aiki", I can debate it to basics in a very few sentences. Or I can post Inaba Sensei's interview and rigorously take it back to show that no other version of "aiki" is truly different. That's what discussions are for.... the exchange of information. You and I can both comfort ourselves with the idea that open discussions help the general martial populace while at the same time entertaining the idea that it doesn't matter what is said publicly, until someone is shown personally, they won't really know how to do these things.
    I know Professor Friday's book well. FWIW, there is one big difference between reiki no ho and kokyu dosa, from what I've gathered. Reiki no ho is trained differently with a slightly different focus on development. The shite in reiki no ho, at least in the beginning levels, apparently raises their hands up until uke's hands break off their wrists. There are things you would learn from this that you would not learn from the kokyu dosa in aikido, which is nearly a pointless exercise (the way it is done). But yeah, they probably would produce similar results if performed correctly (aside from what I noted).
    Either one, assuming it's done correctly, will produce and condition "jin", the essence of "kokyu power". Just knowing that they both use "kokyu power" or "jin" and that every Asian martial arts does, too, should allow someone to extrapolate that the general principles of power usage share a large commonality within Asian martial arts. If someone knows the principals of that power and someone knows how to develop the additive power of "ki" through breathing and other exercises, it's not a matter of "what secret power does this art have?", but "how does this art use and train these common powers?".
    Anyway, it sounds like we understand each other. You would rather risk the possibility of miscommunicating with others about these techniques and principles, assuming that more than likely you already know what Aunkai methods and Daito-ryu aiki is, than play it safe and talk to a select few about your observations after having had hands on exchanges to establish a solid frame of reference. Fair enough ya'll. Have at it. Either way you might meet some interesting people along the way.
    Well, not everyone has access to all sources of information and it doesn't hurt to contribute data to the martial arts community, assuming someone really cares about promoting martial arts practices of good quality. Besides, I've been in the position where I couldn't get useable information myself and I always appreciated someone sharing what they could. I always remember those days when I could get no information and when I promised myself that If I ever got even the rudiments (which is about what I have), I'd share what I could.

    Regards,

    Mike Sigman

  8. #143
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA USA
    Posts
    2,570
    Likes (received)
    44

    Default

    Hello,

    Well, then I suggest that there would be less misunderstanding if factual commentary and rebuttal is offered, rather than the "you wouldn't understand" stuff.
    Hmmm, can't say I've seen this attitude specifically. What I have seen is koryu wankers acting snobby and looking down on gendai arts, and I've seen the non-wankers trying to explain various aspects of koryu arts only to be attacked for their efforts or told they were just wrong. But I really don't think the incapacity to comprehend what is in koryu is an issue (?).

    For instance, within the wider purview of Asian martial arts that uses these ki and "kei"/kokyu types of body skills/conditioning, the idea of "aiki" is not unknown at all.
    Cool, I'm glad ya'll have figured out and have been able to define aiki (something the senior exponents of aiki have not been able to do) and share physical comparisons with the various CMA principles. As I've said before, I'm sure there are things in CMA that I was taught, and haven't seen before, but I can say for a fact that I've never seen exponents of any other art perform Daito-ryu aiki outside of Daito-ryu (or those who have borrowed directy from Daito-ryu). But I'm always open to the unknown.

    For the most part, it seems to me we are beginning to talk in circles around the same points, so there is no benefit in repeating the same points again. Maybe it is a difference in how we've both been taught and have developed in our respective martial arts, but it seems we think differently on a few things.

    Well, not everyone has access to all sources of information and it doesn't hurt to contribute data to the martial arts community, assuming someone really cares about promoting martial arts practices of good quality.
    This is another point we don't agree on. I sympathize to some degree with those who don't have immediate access to qualified instruction, but on the other hand I am one of many who have made and continue to make significant sacrifices to ensure continued learning opportunities. Information like this doesn't come easy, and probably shouldn't come easy. I don't see how making all the teachings of the various martial arts public knowledge will benefit the specific arts. I've yet to be really impressed by any of the modern hybrid arts, and have a lot of respect (and enjoy) the Japanese traditions, who need loyal students to transmit the art in tact to future generations. Contributing data to the martial arts community tends to draw more opportunists and frauds than anything else (not speaking about you specifically).

    Regards.
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

  9. #144
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    6
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Scott
    FWIW, there is one big difference between reiki no ho and kokyu dosa, from what I've gathered. Reiki no ho is trained differently with a slightly different focus on development. The shite in reiki no ho, at least in the beginning levels, apparently raises their hands up until uke's hands break off their wrists. There are things you would learn from this that you would not learn from the kokyu dosa in aikido, which is nearly a pointless exercise (the way it is done). But yeah, they probably would produce similar results if performed correctly (aside from what I noted).
    And how would you describe the average kokyu dosa in aikido?
    Is the problem that most ukes are too cooperative?
    Joep Schuurkes

  10. #145
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA USA
    Posts
    2,570
    Likes (received)
    44

    Default

    And how would you describe the average kokyu dosa in aikido?
    Is the problem that most ukes are too cooperative?
    Well, cooperative uke's are a problem in all areas of aikido, IMO. Let me ask you this - what is the purpose of kokyu dosa? To improve tanden usage, hip usage, etc? Of the small technical curriculum of aikido, why were techniques like kokyu dosa and tenchinage included? I don't mean to sound so cryptic, but I'm not comfortable with explaining my point of view on techniques. I'd simply suggest that little to no benefit is being gained from the way techiques such as these are currently be practiced (in general).

    Regards,
    Nathan Scott
    Nichigetsukai

    "Put strength into your practice, and avoid conceit. It is easy enough to understand a strategy and guard against it after the matter has already been settled, but the reason an opponent becomes defeated is because they didn't learn of it ahead of time. This is the nature of secret matters. That which is kept hidden is what we call the Flower."

    - Zeami Motokiyo, 1418 (Fūshikaden)

  11. #146
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Outside of Phila.
    Posts
    1,494
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default

    Well, in my opinion, cooperative, stuborn, whatever doesn't make that big a difference in kokyu ho. It's an exercise, in most cases, not a technique per say. Now, there are specific techniques used (10 to be exact) in the yoshinkan/doshinkan syllibus of kokyu ho. One that would be recognized easily is tenchinage, most of the others would probably be called kokyu nage of one sort or another. The first 3 though, are in my mind at least, exercises, not really 'waza'. They follow the format of fairly standard kokyu ho when uke is pulling, pushing and holding, and it would seem that the most important features to learn are;

    the shapes that shite makes with the hands
    coordinated breathing
    use of the hips
    moving from kneeling

    In no particular order. I'm not even getting into the ground path things that I believe are probably the most important thing to learn, because I have no idea how to talk about that.

    Best,
    Ron

  12. #147
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    6
    Likes (received)
    0

    Default

    Nathan, thanks for the reply. I read in your previous posts that you don't like to discuss technical specifics and I respect that. So feel free to respond or not to the following.

    Kokyu ho to me is an exercise of dealing with a push with as little 'technique' as possible. There are all kinds of nifty ways to throw someone who grabs your wrists, but that is not the point here. In the basic form of kokyu ho there is virtually no arm movement, so that you learn to deal with the force of the push with your whole body.

    Is there a specific reason why you mentioned tenchi nage? I like to think that all aikido techniques are different manifestations of the basics you learn in kokyu ho. (If I could just learn to actually do aikido that way. )

    Ron, could you please describe those three non-waza kokyu ho of Yoshinkan? I train Aikikai-style and we only push or hold lightly (too lightly).
    Joep Schuurkes

  13. #148
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Atlanta - USA
    Posts
    712
    Likes (received)
    6

    Default

    A couple of thoughts about suwari waza kokyu dosa which I feel is a huge study and a great laboratory. Yes, it is an exercise, but we should strive to derive full benefit from our exercise. I see it as a laboratory because some of the variables have been reduced so we can focus on some important things. I think foremost would be learning to feel each other while applying pressure.

    One of the first things I learned was that uke should win. It is much easier to grab a guys hands and pin them to his lap or push him over. As a beginner, shite is usually easily upended as soon as he begins to move if not before. In other words he is full of holes that can be exploited by uke. Only by learning to hold his structure and move correctly from that structure can shite hope to complete the exercise.

    Not to put words in Nathan's mouth, but unless there is some equality in the exercise (that is uke is not passive) we are not deriving full benefit from it. Also this is not to say that there isn't plenty more to explore and all sorts of defined experiments that can be run and refined in the venue of kokyu dosa.
    Doug Walker
    Completely cut off both heads,
    Let a single sword stand against the cold sky!

  14. #149
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Outside of Phila.
    Posts
    1,494
    Likes (received)
    1

    Default

    Ron, could you please describe those three non-waza kokyu ho of Yoshinkan? I train Aikikai-style and we only push or hold lightly (too lightly).

    Hi Joep,

    I'm a little uncomfortable with too many details in this format, but let's try a few...

    Uke should grip firmly, and really pull, push or hold as appropriate.

    In number one (pull) shite should move from hips first, then arms. It is up to shite to set the distance correctly so that when the hands are offered, your arms are basically in kamae (I guess the unbendable arm might be a good reference) already. If the distance is correct, then the arms will move appropriately when you leave seiza and go to live toes, and shift your hips forward. Follow the line of uke's shoulder blades with your tegatana as you cut up. Standard hombu dojo yoshinkan would be (I believe) to cut up lifting uke with their elbows bent, shuffle to the side to completely unbalance them, then cut down and pin. Another variation (some would say more martial) would be to cross-step in and cut out right after raising uke up.

    In number two (pushing) the important thing is not to let the hands move back. Shite's hands make an omega sign (kind of). Think hands start with palms facing each other, then face mostly up, a little out to the side, then a circle up. Kind of hard to describe.

    Number three (holding) the hands go flat palms up, then up into the shoulder area of uke as in number one.

    In all of these, shite should time uke's breathing before offering the hands. Uke tends to be weakest at the beginning of an inhale...if you time that with your own exhale, you are strong, they are weak. A variation might be...they are at the end of an inhale, so you inhale strongly to continue their inhale while they are already 'full', before they exhale and express their power. I'm sure there are many other timings with the breathing that can work as well. Something fun to play with when someone is large, strong, and has good breath control, is to use their pulse to time the movement and find some weakness.

    Best,
    Ron (another answer is, I have no clue, get on the mat and figure it out with your instructor... )

  15. #150
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Nagoya, Japan
    Posts
    522
    Likes (received)
    31

    Default

    When I worked out with Rob John, we did suwariwaza kokyuho at full strength, really trying keep the other person from executing the technique. I found it was a very good way to get a feel for moving without strength, of trying to get connected and then utilizing kokyu/ki/jin/whathaveyou to move your arms. It gave me insight on why Iwama style (and perhaps Yoshinkan as well, Ron?) normally trains from a solid grab.

    So, there's that.

    And yet, when we do suwariwaza kokyuho, we don't use a solid grab. Which I find odd. Tachiwaza morotetori kokyuho/kokyunage is done with a very solid grab, but not suwariwaza kokyuho... And apparently it's not done with a strong grip in Yoshinkan, either. IIRC, a light grip is suggested in Ueshiba's Budo, is it not? (I no longer have the book at hand.)

    So I got to wondering, why that would be? Then I got to thinking about what Ellis Amdur wrote in his Aikido Journal blog "Aikido is Three Peaches", about how Takeda Sokaku and Ueshiba switched the conventional roles of uke-shite/teacher-student in koryu. (I.e., in koryu the teacher was uke and the student was shite, but in DTRAJJ and Aikido the teacher is shite and the student is uke.) So my kernel of an idea is, maybe the focus in suwariwaza kokyuho is not on shite. Maybe it's on uke. Maybe uke should be getting the most out of it. And maybe uke's job is not to be thrown, but rather to be connected and centered. I think of all the demonstrations where Takeda/Ueshiba/Shioda simply kneels and seiza and someone tries to push them to no avail. Perhaps that's what the purpose of kokyuho is, and perhaps that's why uke isn't supposed to use force to restrain shite...

    I dunno. It's a just an idea, but maybe something to play around with through the years...
    Josh Reyer

    Swa sceal man don, žonne he ęt guše gengan ženceš longsumne lof, na ymb his lif cearaš. - The Beowulf Poet

Page 10 of 13 FirstFirst ... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •